Welcome to Britmodeller.com

Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to contribute to this site by submitting your own content or replying to existing content. You'll be able to customize your profile, receive reputation points as a reward for submitting content, while also communicating with other members via your own private inbox, plus much more! This message will be removed once you have signed in.

This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

  • Announcements

    • Mike

      PhotoBucket are no longer permitting 3rd party hosting   01/07/17

      As most of you are now painfully aware, Photobucket (PB) are stopping/have stopped allowing their members to link their accumulated years of photos into forums and the like, which they call 3rd party linking.  You can give them a non-refundable $399 a year to allow links, but I doubt that many will be rushing to take them up on that offer.  If you've previously paid them for the Pro account, it looks like you've got until your renewal to find another place to host your files, but you too will be subject to this ban unless you fork over a lot of cash.   PB seem to be making a concerted move to another type of customer, having been the butt of much displeasure over the years of a constantly worsening user interface, sloth and advertising pop-ups, with the result that they clearly don't give a hoot about the free members anymore.  If you don't have web space included in your internet package, you need to start looking for another photo host, but choose carefully, as some may follow suit and ditch their "free" members at some point.  The lesson there is keep local backups on your hard drive of everything you upload, so you can walk away if the same thing happens.   There's a thread on the subject here, so please use that to curse them, look for solutions or generall grouse about their mental capacity.   Not a nice situation for the forum users that hosted all their photos there, and there will now be a host of useless threads that relied heavily on photos from PB, but as there's not much we can do other than petition for a more equitable solution, I suggest we make the best of what we have and move on.  One thing is for certain.  It won't win them any friends, but they may not care at this point.    Mike.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
GazB

Wheel Replication

I'm considering trying to replicate wheels for an older HEMTT kit I have (the Tanker, which doesn't seem to exist anywhere anymore). I currently have a set of resin ones I'm using on another M977, but these are actually too small in diameter to be entirely correct. Since the DEF wheels I was looking at were both expensive and snapped up almost instantly, I've looked into the possibility of creating moulds of the tyres and hubs from the Italeri M1120, which I also have.

 

I've never done casting before so I'm a little unsure as to the process. I don't really have the ability to buy all of those pressure components and stuff, but I've been looking at this product: http://www.greenstuffworld.com/en/inicio/545-silicone-putty-300gr.html

 

Been wondering what would be easy stuff to pour into it, and what the best way to cast these wheels would be. I've considered assembly of the tyres and hubs, then making three moulds for each of the types. Its how to position the wheels in the mould that I'm wondering about. A single piece mould would provide the best result but, trying to get the wheel out again (I considered adding a small stick to create a channel) is something I'm not sure about. A two piece mould could work but, I don't know how I could pour a liquid into both and get a good result ultimately.

 

Any advice on this would be much appreciated :)

 

Gaz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Doesn't look like a mould to pour this into is of any concern, as its a rather thick putty, kneaded by hand. How I would go about this:

 

Mount the master on a base (which will form your pour block / funnel), modeling a pour gate.

 

Knead up the putty and fully enclose the master and pour doohickey with copious amounts of putty. Set the whole shebang on a flat surface with the pour gate oriented upward, squishing the bottom to form a solid base for later.

 

Once it's hardened, use a fine blade to cut an scour along the pour gate and as far around the perimeter of the wheel as is necessery to work the wheel free from the mould. Pull out the master. Using silicone has the advantage that you can work from single piece moulds, as they stretch and bend easily and snap back into their original shape.

 

Pour to your heart's content.

 

If you don't like "blobby" hand kneaded moulds, you can use what many use for casting liquid silicones: Lego. I'd start as described above, then squeeze the mould into a Lego frame instead of just setting it on a flat surface.

Edited by Hotel Papa
typos / semantics
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Hotel Papa said:

Doesn't look like a mould to pour this into is of any concern, as its a rather thick putty, kneaded by hand. How I would go about this:

 

Mount the master on a base (which will form your pour block / funnel), modeling a pour gate.

 

Knead up the putty and fully enclose the master and pour doohickey with copious amounts of putty. Set the whole shebang on a flat surface with the pour gate oriented upward, squishing the bottom to form a solid base for later.

 

Once it's hardened, use a fine blade to cut an scour along the pour gate and as far around the perimeter of the wheel as is necessery to work the wheel free from the mould. Pull out the master. Using silicone has the advantage that you can work from single piece moulds, as they stretch and bend easily and snap back into their original shape.

 

Pour to your heart's content.

 

If you don't like "blobby" hand kneaded moulds, you can use what many use for casting liquid silicones: Lego. I'd start as described above, then squeeze the mould into a Lego frame instead of just setting it on a flat surface.

 

Thanks for the advice ^_^

 

Gaz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, one more thing. I've been looking into the various resins around and they all seem to be large bottles or tins and rather nasty stuff. In fact the only epoxy resin I found that looks like what imagined (with the two syringes), is the AK Interactive water stuff. Everything other one was an adhesive. So I'm wondering, can something like liquid plaster or hydrocal be used, just for ease?

 

Gaz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gaz,

 

You could use "Durham's Rock Hard Water Putty". It's a powder that you add very small amounts of water to, then mix. Pour into your mold (has to be liquid tight) and let dry. Will have about same consistently as hardened plaster when done, so not as tough as resin. You may also have to glue it on with canopy glue or the like. Play around with the water/mix ratio  and see what happens. Good news is, it won't stick to plastic, so no mold release needed.

 

The Durham's is carried by the big box lumber stores in the US, can't say where you might find it in UK.

 

Good luck,

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/04/2017 at 9:54 PM, GazB said:

Oh, one more thing. I've been looking into the various resins around and they all seem to be large bottles or tins and rather nasty stuff. In fact the only epoxy resin I found that looks like what imagined (with the two syringes), is the AK Interactive water stuff. Everything other one was an adhesive. So I'm wondering, can something like liquid plaster or hydrocal be used, just for ease?

 

Gaz

for very small quantities you can use Araldite or similar two-part epoxy glue

An alternative is David's Fastglas fibreglass resin, minimum quantity tin is about 125ml

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/4/2017 at 9:32 PM, Black Knight said:

for very small quantities you can use Araldite or similar two-part epoxy glue

An alternative is David's Fastglas fibreglass resin, minimum quantity tin is about 125ml

 

Cool, thanks :)

 

Gaz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0