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Mike

Eduard
Mosquito FB.VI Engines (632090 for Tamiya)

Mosquito FB.VI Engines (632090 for Tamiya)

1:32 Eduard Big Sin

 

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Tamiya's big Mossie is an awesome kit, and these new resin engines should take that awesomeness up a notch, as Eduard's use of 3D printing technology is by now legendary, as is their casting skill which IMHO is second to none.  This set arrives in a large flat box due to scale and contents, and has a weighty feel that gives a clue to what's inside.  Underneath the large instruction booklet and a layer of bubble wrap are nine bags of resin parts, and one containing two frets of Photo-Etch (PE), with a grand total of 180 resin parts!!!!  Some of them are tiny, but there are a substantial number of large parts, and the work that has gone into the design and casting must have been phenomenal.

 

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Before you start you will need some lengths of wire of 0.3mm, 0.4mm, 0.5mm, 0.8mm and 1mm diameters to be able to do this set justice, so pick up either some lead fly-tying wire from an angling shop, or florist's wire and follow the instructions carefully.  There are 21 steps in all, beginning with the cylinder heads and blocks with their electrical connections to the spark plugs, followed by the supercharger and ancillary equipment that sits on one end of the engines.   The engine's crankcase is then built up with its own ancillary equipment, and the piston banks are added into keyed recesses, as are the supercharger to the rear and the reduction gear housing at the front.  Between the two banks of 6 pistons form a V-shape at the top of the engine, and the supercharger feed-tubes run along the space between them feeding the engine with lots of compressed air, along with another bank of spark-plugs (2 per cylinder in total), which are fed by PE wires.

 

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With main engine construction completed, attention turns toward mountings and connections to the rest of the airframe.  This begins with the engine bearings being constructed along with some additional equipment that is attached now for ease.  The cowlings need a little preparation to remove the casting flash across the exhaust ports on the engine sides, which are simple to cut free and are marked in red on the instructions.  These are added to the sides of the engine, a bulkhead is built up from a number of parts, additional wiring, hoses and equipment are added all around, including a curved reservoir around the reduction housing, and the propeller shaft is installed at the business end of the engine with a couple of PE parts and another resin part finishing off that area.  The lower cowling is then constructed with the chin intake and a PE mesh preventing FOD ingress.  The corresponding intake is attached to the underside of the engine, and various additional coolant hoses, actuator rods, wires and the automatic fire extinguisher are glued in place while the engine is inverted.

 

The exhausts are supplied as two types, with the two rear stubs conjoined on the inboard bank of pistons, and an optional surround that slips over the stubs before they are attached to the block.  More wire is added, as is the disc in front of the reduction gear, additional struts forming part of the engine bearers, more hoses etc.  Then you get to do it all again with the other engine, with some of the parts mirrored, but many identical to the opposite side, as the basic engines were the same.

 

 

Conclusion

Wow!  It's not often that I'm blown away by an aftermarket set, but the attention to detail, the sheer clarity and amount of said detail as well as the quantity of parts is breathtaking.  Sure it's an expensive set, and it will keep you busy with the glue and paint for a LOOONG time, but the results have the potential for perfection, if only there was a perfect modeller!

 

Very highly recommended.

 

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Review sample courtesy of

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Amazing!

A kit in its own right.

Rick.

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2 hours ago, Rick Brown said:

A kit in its own right.

 

A phrase that crossed my mind while I was writing the review, actually :)

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Hello Dears,

That spark some 1/32 envy:o

But No ! I must resist, I must resist !

Very nice kit indeed and thank for the review.

Sincerely.

Corsaircorp

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I like the way they have made it easier to cut fragile and small bits off the runners with the thinned attachment towers rather than having to carefully cut the whole part of the molding block

.

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That is pure Mosquito p**n!   :gobsmacked:

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11 hours ago, Pagey said:

I like the way they have made it easier to cut fragile and small bits off the runners with the thinned attachment towers rather than having to carefully cut the whole part of the molding block

.

 

It works too.  Same goes for the wheels & such.  Very little in the way of clean up of parts, which is always nice :)

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lets hope that other manufacturers follow suit as I hate cutting resin bits off of large blocks.

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Wow - I wish I had not clicked on this link ...  1/32nd Mossie is on the wish list (no idea where I would display it) now I would have go at least Big Sin as well , that looks amazing

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