Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Jim Kiker

Y-wing- 1/48 scale scratchbuild diary

Recommended Posts

Gimme Shelter    1,803

hey this is great work - the boys at ILM will be proud to see their work continues to live on ..

 

I did not know this, but having read my 2nd hand .99p Dorling Kindersley Star Wars Cross Sections book last night (maybe a tad sad for a 50 year old's bed time reading but I'm not ashamed), the Y wing was manufactured with panel covers to enclose all these lovely bits of detail - however due to the amount of work the Rebel Alliance had to continually undertake, they chose to permanently remove the outer panel covers for ease of repair ... and, no 2 Y wings were the same... apparently.

 

Does this make me a nerd or just plain old and sad ? !

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Chief Smeg    256

Which makes them like the MRA2 Nimrods then. 

 

Nice little factoid there. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jim Kiker    204

Hi all,

 

For those of you who have chosen to reply, I thank you for all the kind words and I'm glad you are enjoying this thread!

 

For Gimme,  I have a couple of buddies who did not care to be referred to as Model Geeks.  They are both big fans of American football, so I asked a few questions.  Do you know the players?  "Yes."  Do you keep up with all the statistics?  "Yes."  Do you belong to a formal tailgating group?  "Of course!"  I see, I said; you guys are football geeks!  They started to get a little steamed, then cooled down; they had to admit that they are indeed football and modeling geeks.  Personally, I am happy to admit I'm a model geek; everyone is a geek about something.  So mate, no need to feel old and sad.  Embrace your inner geek and seek happiness where it lies.

 

As for the Y-wing, it is certainly true that no two movie model Y-wings were exactly the same, although for the most part they are actually pretty close for anyone who is not a Star Wars fan geek.  Remember too that no one who worked on those models or the movie itself knew that it would go Nova when released.  At that point, it became time to cash in with merchandise, media, models, and eventually, nostalgia.  That led to the novels, the cross sections books, and tons of other things.  They had to create new answers to the "why do the ships look like that?" questions.  And that, in my opinion, gives some modelers fits and others freedom.  There were something like five studio filming Y-wing models plus a few purpose-built pyrotechnic ships designed to be blown up.  A generation of modelers continue to figure out what pieces from what kits were used on each of those models and then recreate a particular Y-wing in studio scale.  I have to admire the time and effort and money that takes, but I have always wanted a smaller, less expensive version.  That said, I have to admit I've poured a lot of time and effort into my Y-wing, so maybe it's not so different after all.  To each his own!

 

Cheers all, Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mike    10,668

Lovely work Jim - a real inspiration.  I've been wanting a 1:48 Y-Wing since the Finemolds 1:48 X-Wing came out, and it doesn't look like I'll be getting my wish any time soon unless I rob your house later this year :ninja:  Keep up the fight! :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jim Kiker    204
Posted (edited)

Hi all,

 

Sorry I’ve nearly dropped off the face of the planet for some weeks!  In the last episode, Our Hero was ready to assemble the vectral pieces, complete the cockpit and nose section, and begin final finishing…  Actually, by mid-May I was getting further and further behind schedule; I was planning on taking the finished model to WonderFest, one of the really neat modeling conventions anywhere.  This year the ‘Fest was held on the first weekend of June.  With two weeks left, it was still possible but I needed to get the front LED’s in place and add the fiber optics with the cockpit tub mounted.  That was not without its own issues.  With about four days left, I hit a snag in getting the upper nose into place; while I was thoroughly bummed I knew I just needed to leave her unfinished rather than completely screwing her up in a rush.

 

So let’s play a little catch-up on the Y-wing.  I previously showed a picture of the crew while still in work.  Once they were mostly complete I used some tan paint to prime them, then brush painted the base colors of orange (a bit faded in this case)and off-white for the backseater’s chest protector; the pilot has opted not to wear that bit of kit since it was not comfortable for her to wear.  Medium Sea Grey was used for the harness and parachute straps, dark gray for the chest packs, and so on.  I masked off the figures’ heads and spray painted the helmets a very pale gray.  I painted the faces with a base coat of flesh and a darker shade around the eyes, lips, etc.; I chose not to try to paint the eyes based on a figure painting guide I found and I like how that turned out.  Here is an intermediate picture of the crew dogs posing for a shot before their final detail painting. 

 

Y-%20cockpit%20wip%202%20s_zpsjszl2hiu.j

 

If you look back at the figures in work, you will see a fine white line across their faces; my plan was to mix up some clear epoxy, add some clear yellow to it, and just drop it into the top half of the faces, relying on the .010” plastic rod I had glued on to “catch” the epoxy and make a semi-clear visor.  It nearly worked pretty well.  Meanwhile, the seats got a coat of Medium Sea Grey, olive green padding, a gloss clear coat, some darker washes, and a clear flat coat before going into the cockpit.  As an aside, a couple of weeks after these pictures were made my buddy Wally informed me that Star Wars helmets cannot be a single color without some markings on them.  So I dutifully dug around in my decal stash and came up with some tiny round decals.  Here the crew is nearly done.

 

Y-%20cockpit%20wip%203%20s_zpsry5h5gvh.j

 

Next up was to build the instrument panels.  They were made with .015” clear for the main panels, with .020” solid rear pieces (actually the back side of the instrument panel) and .040” strip glued around the edges to make a shallow box.  I glued an additional .010” sheet onto the clear sheet that had been pre-drilled to make holes to represent the gauges.  The gauges were taped off and the whole box painted off black.  I had a set of old instrument decals which are black faces with the instrument markings left clear.  These I applied individually; this was a struggle with old decals that did not want to stay put.

 

Y-%20inst%20panels%20wip%201%20s_zpspfsh

 

By the way, if you scroll back up one in the pictures, you will see the finished panels as well as the crew.

 

Once the instrument panels were ready, they were glued into place and holes were drilled into the side edges.  With that done I simply threaded one fiber optic strand into each end of the assemblies.  The plan was for the light to splash around inside the boxes and gently illuminate the dials from behind.  That almost worked but the light is very dim and will largely go un-noticed unless you look in from the rear angles.  Ah well… two strands might have done much better!  I then added two fiber optic strands on each side console of the pilot and the WSO, adding a heavy coat of clear red and clear yellow to the ends.  These turned out as desired, visible from each side but not bright.  In my experience cockpit lighting is mostly set to be dim to lessen the impact on the crew’s night vision.  In any event, to be honest it was a struggle to get everything into place; if the fiber optics remain unbroken through this time next year I will be very thankful!  The last cockpit items were the front coaming set over the pilot’s instrument panel, and the control sticks.  The sticks were made similar to modern fighters, a central short stick above a fixed pedestal (and by far the easiest way to fit a control stick into a cramped cockpit).  Being in a hurry at that point, I did not take a picture of the nose with the fiber optics in place before the top piece was glued on; still, you can see some of the strands in the picture below.

 

Y-%20upper%20nose%20wip%202s_zpscxaaueps

 

Alternating between the front and the rear end, I figured out a way to build the rear maneuvering vectrals inside the rings.  These are only a general match for the usual Y-wing units, but I did design them as if they will work as thrust diverters mimicking the use of rudders and elevators on a real vehicle.  The vertical pieces make up the rudder and a fixed forward support unit while the horizontal pieces represent the elevators.  Each vertical and horizontal piece has two thicknesses of .015” sheet making the skins, with .030” spacers in between; the horizontal pieces were assembled and then cut in half.  Here are the pieces ready for assembly. The assembly on the right is just pieced together for a fit check; not bad!

 

Y-%20control%20surfaces%20wip%20s_zpsy9d

 

The vertical one piece assemblies were installed first with two pieces of .030” brass tube mounted from the outside in and pushed part of the way in.  The horizontal pieces were held in place on one side, and a single piece of .030” brass was used to go fully across the span of the elevators (through the rudder assembly).  This gives the two assemblies a bit more rigidity.  The upper and lower vertical pieces were then pushed home, all glued in with epoxy.  If you look at how thin the outer rings are (having been vacuformed, remember), I needed to build as much strength into these units as I could manage; even so they will always be somewhat fragile.  On the other hand, they do look pretty much in scale which pleases me a great deal.  Here are the finished assemblies, minus the inner rings which will be added soon.  Upper left shows the rudder on the back side; middle right shows the "front face" with the elevator pieces facing forward and the front of the rudder assembly.

 

Y-%20finished%20vectrals%20s_zpsg25cclcz

 

Well, that pretty much catches us up.  I will post more as soon as I can.  See you all next time!

Cheers, Jim

Edited by Jim Kiker
Edit text.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gimme Shelter    1,803

wow - an amazing top up of modelling expertise there - can't wait to see the Y Wing completed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×