Welcome to Britmodeller.com

Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to contribute to this site by submitting your own content or replying to existing content. You'll be able to customize your profile, receive reputation points as a reward for submitting content, while also communicating with other members via your own private inbox, plus much more! This message will be removed once you have signed in.

This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

  • Announcements

    • Mike

      PhotoBucket are no longer permitting 3rd party hosting   01/07/17

      As most of you are now painfully aware, Photobucket (PB) are stopping/have stopped allowing their members to link their accumulated years of photos into forums and the like, which they call 3rd party linking.  You can give them a non-refundable $399 a year to allow links, but I doubt that many will be rushing to take them up on that offer.  If you've previously paid them for the Pro account, it looks like you've got until your renewal to find another place to host your files, but you too will be subject to this ban unless you fork over a lot of cash.   PB seem to be making a concerted move to another type of customer, having been the butt of much displeasure over the years of a constantly worsening user interface, sloth and advertising pop-ups, with the result that they clearly don't give a hoot about the free members anymore.  If you don't have web space included in your internet package, you need to start looking for another photo host, but choose carefully, as some may follow suit and ditch their "free" members at some point.  The lesson there is keep local backups on your hard drive of everything you upload, so you can walk away if the same thing happens.   There's a thread on the subject here, so please use that to curse them, look for solutions or generall grouse about their mental capacity.   Not a nice situation for the forum users that hosted all their photos there, and there will now be a host of useless threads that relied heavily on photos from PB, but as there's not much we can do other than petition for a more equitable solution, I suggest we make the best of what we have and move on.  One thing is for certain.  It won't win them any friends, but they may not care at this point.    Mike.
Crossiant Oliver

The Weirdest Instructions I've ever seen

68 posts in this topic
1 hour ago, Crossiant Oliver said:

Speaking of terrible kits, the worst kit I've ever got was the Revell P-40B tiger shark. It's from 1964, and the mold shows it needs a replacement. There's a lot a flash, the kit barely fits, and there are raised surfaces. The only good thing are the decals, which can be made into 3 different planes (lucky for me, Revell accidentally gave me 2 decal sheets! Good thing I got the airfix 1/48 version, it's amazing!

 

Gee I am old enough to remember when the Monogram 1/48 P40B was the absolute bee's knees. I built one the moment it hit our shores. The amount of detail was by the standards of the day stunning. O tempora o mores and I remember back in the 1950s how the plastic bag and header on Airfix kits was my primary source of knowledge about the aircraft I was building.    

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the early 70s,I had a Japanese kit, I think it was a Kate,I don't remember the manufacturer . The instructions were in English but must have been translated by a college student.The page with the colour scheme was titled: THE WAY OF PAINTING.

 

 

First, clear your mind before you pick up the brush.:pray:

 

Garry c

5 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Work In Progress said:

 

Only that the single engined ones are no longer available new, and that the current iteration of the Mosquito doesn't seem cheap at £25.

 

But for those who are prepared to root around the second hand boxes at shows they are excellent value, and I've bought many over the years to pass on to newcomers, especially the 109F, Hurricane and Stuka, which I like a lot and can still be bought second-hand in the £5 to £6 range if you keep your eyes open, You do normally have to think about after-market decals for old Airfix kits, though of course lots of us have spare options we can snip out and give away. There are also Monogram 1/48 kits that I like a lot, especially the P-47D Razorback, though I note that those have now stopped being cheap (I blame the forthcoming MM group build!)

 

And Otaki / ARII Hellcats and Corsairs are excellent low-cost practice pieces too.

There are still people who say that no kit has captured the Hellcat's "smile" quite as well as the Otaki/Arii kit.Their P-47D Razorback is quite nice too. There's also a J2M3 Raiden, A6M5 Zero, Bf 109G-6, and Fw190 that, while clearly superseded by newer kits are still fun to build. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Crossiant Oliver said:

I think the decals looked bad because I didn't put a good gloss coat. 

 

 

they were Academy decals and in every Academy kit I've built the decals looked fine on the sheet but were stiff, unresponsive and brittle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, VMA131Marine said:

There are still people who say that no kit has captured the Hellcat's "smile" quite as well as the Otaki/Arii kit.Their P-47D Razorback is quite nice too. There's also a J2M3 Raiden, A6M5 Zero, Bf 109G-6, and Fw190 that, while clearly superseded by newer kits are still fun to build. 

 

The Monogram P-47 is a more accurate low-cost option though. The Otaki one, which I enjoyed when I built it, has nice surface detail but is noticeably too fat around the rear fuselage. The P-51D also has some significant shape issues. I can't really judge the Japanese or German subjects.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, MilneBay said:

 

Gee I am old enough to remember when the Monogram 1/48 P40B was the absolute bee's knees. I built one the moment it hit our shores. The amount of detail was by the standards of the day stunning. O tempora o mores and I remember back in the 1950s how the plastic bag and header on Airfix kits was my primary source of knowledge about the aircraft I was building.    

 

When it was new it was excllent, but it has not only suffered from changes in standards, it seems also to have suffered a great deal from deterioration in the manufacturing. I f you can get an early release its still well worth building in my opinion, but the later releases are very difficult, typically badly warped and ill fitting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Garry c said:

In the early 70s,I had a Japanese kit, I think it was a Kate,I don't remember the manufacturer . The instructions were in English but must have been translated by a college student.The page with the colour scheme was titled: THE WAY OF PAINTING.

 

 

First, clear your mind before you pick up the brush.:pray:

 

Garry c

I was doing maintenance on a Yak 52 some years ago and the manuals had been translated by something like google translate

on an off day by an unwell spider monkey.

Every servicing instruction started with the line "Find a plane" didnt state that it had to be a Yak, could have been a Cessna you just had to

find one.

The best one was the description for bailing out of the aircraft "Departing through side of plane with parachute"

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My return to plastic modeling in the early 90s was made better for the Airfix Mk.Vb and the Otaki Mk.VIII Spitfire kits. Both of which needed modification to represent RAAF aircraft. The enjoyment drawn from them was like building my first Aurora Sopwith Camel and D.III Albatross before teenage. Around 1963 I strayed into automobile modelling in 1/32 scale. Very rewarding and encouraged creativity vis á vis colour, detail and later, form. 

 

Prior to that anything released from 1956 that cost less than two bob were my plastic. All fell to bedspread ack-ack. 

 

Instructions. The newer kits I have for my retirement are lusciously moulded, with assemblies which require direction. Wingnut Wings and Tamiya 1/32 scale kitsets being a case in point. Then aftermarket. 😎 If you eschew instruction, resin kits. 

 

I do like to slap together an old kit such as Smer reissues of someone else's product. Fiat G.55. Talbot Lago, old Glencoe kits etc owe me nothing financially and deserve to be built after being stored and carted around all those years. 

 

Grant

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 13/01/2017 at 7:26 PM, Work In Progress said:

 

 but were stiff, unresponsive and brittle.

Sounds very like many of the people I've had to work with over the years.

 

Actually, reading that, perhaps I was the problem......

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 14/01/2017 at 6:51 PM, Crossiant Oliver said:

 

sorry, but ... WHY?

 

Really of interest only to people living in LA or possibly planning to visit!

 

Most of us will have favourite LMS's.  Some of us also lament their passing too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2017-01-14 at 7:28 PM, Crossiant Oliver said:

What do other people think of the Revell-ogram kits?

Some of them are still the best of their respective subjects, and while others may have more detailed/accurate alternatives available, are still very good and certainly much cheaper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

at the present time I happen to be working on a pair of 1989 re-issues of the MONOGRAM P-40C.

one for the RAF and another for the AVG.

I have built (or am building again) several of these classic 1/48th WWII planes over the years.

2 P-61's ,2 B-26 Marauders ,B-25J ,F4U-4N,Avenger,SBD,2 Hellcats,a Mustang,Spitfire IIA,2 bubbletop Thunderbolts,3 razorback Thunderbolts

2 P-38's ,3 Hurricanes 2 Typhoons and 5 P-39 Airaobras.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back to the Airfix instructions discussion, I remember those picture-less written instructions and I must say they were the first source of aeronautical data I came across. I can thank these instructions for learning what an aileron, pitot , elevator and other bits and pieces were, I still recall being puzzled for a while by the words "anti dazzle panel", yes instructions are much better today but I do retain a fondness for the old ways

5 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/01/2017 at 1:43 AM, Crossiant Oliver said:

First of all, thanks for the pictures. If you want to look at them, look at the first reply. 

 

 

But Airfix at least has to redo a 40+ year old kit and instruction sets. What beginner modeler wants to continue the hobby when they see instructions like this! I've built older kits, and some of them in my opinion had better instructions (the monogram wildcat, etc.

 

 

also is the Revell 1/48 dauntless a good beginner kit? I gave a friend who wants to start the hobby it for x-mas

 

I don't really get the problem tbh - I grew up with this style of instructions. I always just ticked off each part on the sheet as I went if there were lots to do in that panel.

 

If nothing else it taught me to test-fit first before glueing anything!

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/01/2017 at 5:59 AM, Crossiant Oliver said:

Honestly, Airfix REALLY needs to change these instructions. Even I'm an intermediate modeler, and these instructions still give me a sense of confusion! Someone call Airfix and tell them about this!

 

Honestly, I don't understand this kind of sense of entitlement. Is it something cultural or is it a generational difference? Reading your other posts, you seem a nice enough young man, but as the majority of the answers indicate, the instructions don't seem to be a problem for most of us. I do hope you can appreciate the tongue-in-cheek humour in this thread, I certainly do! ;)

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, ivand said:

 

Honestly, I don't understand this kind of sense of entitlement. Is it something cultural or is it a generational difference? Reading your other posts, you seem a nice enough young man, but as the majority of the answers indicate, the instructions don't seem to be a problem for most of us. I do hope you can appreciate the tongue-in-cheek humour in this thread, I certainly do! ;)

 

I agree. With the benefit of a bit of age behind me now, I can recognise that in life in general, we don't always get information given to us in the exact format that works best for us individually. Even in schools lessons are delivered in a particular way which aren't ideal for many of the individuals in a class.

 

Simplistically, one can either take information however we can get it and learn to work with it, or fail.

 

Learning to comprehend model kit instructions presented in different ways is a very gentle way to learn that sort of can-do mindset.

5 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now