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Continuing on with the missing wiring...it was time to make the main relay loom....this was achieved with various wires from my stock....then bunched together and wrapped with 'cloth' insulating tape.

 

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Next came two of the missing connectors.....these were turned in the Dremel...using 'cuticle' sticks as the basis....and shaped with files and sanding sticks.

Once I had the shape I wanted they were coloured with a black marker pen whilst still in the Dremel.

 

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They were then drilled at each end for the wires and added to the loom.

 

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With the loom done...next came the very fiddly job of connecting all the wires to the loom.

At the same time I added a couple of the previously made cables to their connecting points.

 

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A note to other builders......Pocher only give two (2) cables for this whole section!....both of which are incorrect in their position and locating points.

 

Ron

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Taking a break from adding all those missing cables/wires and connectors....I did some work on the Charcoal Canister.

This had been previously weathered and the fixings changed for the Scale Hardware bolts.

It was then bolted to the main engine block ready for the relevant cable/pipes to be added.

 

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This is now becoming very difficult to handle without damaging all the added parts and detailing....and bloody heavy!

 

Ron

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Nifty solutions for the extra wiring and connections. I never knew that bikes had charcoal canisters; you learn something new every day! I can certainly sympathize with the handling aspect of the model as more and more detail is added. It seems to be a balancing act on how to hold it and continue to add details without breaking off what you have already attached. The fact that these Pochers are so big and heavy doesn't make it any easier. 

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Here's a thought that may or may not apply to your Ducati lump; make a 'work stand' out of scrap.

I cobbled some scrap basswood, plastic rod and tacks to safely hold the Rolls lump for fine work and storage. Note all the doo-dads are in place and hanging off everywhere. I stuck the rods and tacks in ports and the thing sat on it's side securely. Crude but effective:

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1 hour ago, larchiefeng said:

Nifty solutions for the extra wiring and connections. I never knew that bikes had charcoal canisters; you learn something new every day! I can certainly sympathize with the handling aspect of the model as more and more detail is added. It seems to be a balancing act on how to hold it and continue to add details without breaking off what you have already attached. The fact that these Pochers are so big and heavy doesn't make it any easier. 

 

True...very true.

Pochers are not user friendly when it comes to working on/handling them as the build progresses....although the cars are easier to manage in comparison to the Ducati.

Glad you like the wiring and connectors....makes it worth the doing.

 

Ron

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Thanks for that Mr C....it is something I have been struggling to come up with a solution too.

 

As I explained a while back....I have left the sump pan off...so that I have the flat bottom of the main block to rest it on whilst working on it.

This flat area is 50mm x 60mm...with only the bolt holes for the sump pan around the edge.

There are absolutely no places on the upper area where I can attach any supports or posts.

This problem is going to get much worse in the near future when the sump pan has to be fitted...as it is pyramidal in shape...and the contact area is reduced to 12 mm x 17 mm !!!

Another worry is that the exhaust follows the sump pan in assembly steps...which means the whole engine will be 'sitting' on the mufflers...and I don't believe they can take all that weight with only three bolts being the weight bearers.

A very difficult problem to ponder and overcome.

 

Ron

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Great work on this mate.

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34 minutes ago, kpnuts said:

Great work on this mate.

 

Many thanks Ken...much appreciated :)

 

Ron

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Posted (edited)

Having put the main engine block aside until the next sub assemblies are ready....I started work on the Throttle Bodies.

 

First order of the day was to make the missing 'Butterflies' and their Actuating Rods.

The Butterflies were made from brass shim....with the the rods being 3 mm brass tube.

The rods were first cross cut in the mill for the screws...then holes were drilled to take M1.2 mm screws.

I polished the heads of the screws to remove the 'blacking'....and fixed them with a drop of CA.

 

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Next up was the fiddly job of fixing the butterflies and rods into the throat of the body.....DS tape for the butterflies.....and CA for the rods.

 

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The end plates kit screws were replaced with Scale Hardware bolts....and some light weathering applied.

 

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I am keeping the weathering light for this whole assembly....as the throttles are mostly contained within the 'Airbox'....so....once this section is complete....I will apply a layer of 'dust' using ground up pastels.

 

Ron

Edited by silver911
text edit

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Awesome work.

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If these were zinc, you'd have made real parts. Did you measure throttle tip-in too?? :clap2:

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It's really hard to believe that this engine and parts aren't the real thing! Can we do a Vulcan mind meld so, I can learn to do paint and weathering with oils? Unbelievable, I know I sound like a broken record but, I've never seen anything so life like. I'll just stop now.

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1 hour ago, kpnuts said:

Awesome work.

 

Many thanks for kind words mate....much appreciated.

 

Glad your enjoying the build :)

 

Ron

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26 minutes ago, Codger said:

If these were zinc, you'd have made real parts. Did you measure throttle tip-in too?? :clap2:

 

Hi Mr C....truth be told...it's 2 degrees out!....

Oh...and I took a leaf out of your book....it took three attempts to make those rods...doh!

Glad you like the progress :)

 

Regards

 

Ron

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22 minutes ago, larchiefeng said:

It's really hard to believe that this engine and parts aren't the real thing! Can we do a Vulcan mind meld so, I can learn to do paint and weathering with oils? Unbelievable, I know I sound like a broken record but, I've never seen anything so life like. I'll just stop now.

 

Really pleased you find the weathering believable mate....it makes it worth the effort ;)

 

Easy for me to say but....the techniques I use are not difficult to learn....always happy to answer any questions you may have.

 

Ron

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I can only agree to what Chas and Wayne already said. If you would be buuilding and photographing a 1:1, nobody would have said: "Come on, your kidding us, this is a model of the bike."

 

Wonderful stuff.

 

Where can we find info on the use of oils for weathering. Must try it myself one day.

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Amazing work, simply stunning attention to detail.

 

Not trying to be a pain in the proverbial, just adding a bit of information that you may have overlooked,  but the throttle shafts should (I think) be flat across the back where the butterfly sits, to bring the butterfly itself up to the centre line of the shaft. Without that, it won't be able to turn... (Certainly every carburettor or fuel injection throttle body that I've ever seen has been flat on the back, except those that had a slot in them to put the butterfly through before adding the screws.)

 

As you say however, it'll be in the airbox and hence probably never seen again.

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2 hours ago, Pouln said:

I can only agree to what Chas and Wayne already said. If you would be buuilding and photographing a 1:1, nobody would have said: "Come on, your kidding us, this is a model of the bike."

 

Wonderful stuff.

 

Where can we find info on the use of oils for weathering. Must try it myself one day.

 

Lol...yes it is indeed the model Poul...and I am very pleased that you like the weathering and effects I am using.

 

As for finding info on the use of oils for weathering....to the best of my knowledge this is a technique that is unique to me....and one I developed several years ago during my time in the figure arena.

If you really want more info...drop me a PM...and I will try to help you.

 

Regards

 

Ron

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1 hour ago, Rob G said:

Amazing work, simply stunning attention to detail.

 

Not trying to be a pain in the proverbial, just adding a bit of information that you may have overlooked,  but the throttle shafts should (I think) be flat across the back where the butterfly sits, to bring the butterfly itself up to the centre line of the shaft. Without that, it won't be able to turn... (Certainly every carburettor or fuel injection throttle body that I've ever seen has been flat on the back, except those that had a slot in them to put the butterfly through before adding the screws.)

 

As you say however, it'll be in the airbox and hence probably never seen again.

 

Morning Rob and glad you like the added detail.

 

Not a pain....because you are 100% correct about the actuating rods having a flat back.

As I said to Mr C....the ones you see were my third attempt...and my last piece of 3 mm brass tube!...which I had a bitch of a job holding level in the mill/vice...so...having done the flats and holes...I chickened out at milling the flat on the back.

What I should have done was use rod and not tube...lesson learned :(

 

Cheers

 

Ron

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Following on from the last update....work continues on the throttles.

I have begun to add some of the missing details...such as connectors...plugs...and cables...with a few hose clamps where applicable.

What cables you see in the pictures...are about a third of the wiring loom of the real bike...purely associated with the throttles/motors/valves etc.

There are still more plugs to be fabricated...along with the rest of the loom!

As with all the previous stages...I have used the scale hardware replacements when needed...and corrected other fixings to mirror reference pictures of the real bike.

I have kept the weathering fairly light and dusty...as this assembly is almost totally enclosed in the 'Air Box' on the bike.

As a point of interest to other potential builders....as an OOB build...there is only one piece of tube/cable represented in this assembly per the kit instructions!

 

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With potentially three times as much wiring to be added....it is becoming a headache just planning the routing of all the wires in the loom for this one assembly!

At this moment in time...I have left plenty of extra length on the added wires...to allow me to pick the easiest route for each to enter into the main loom....and then to be terminated at the best point on the bike for ease of final assembly.

 

Ron

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I know that I sound like a broken record here but, this has to be the most realistic looking paint on the forum! Even with it sitting on the cutting mat it looks like the real thing! Heck of a job Ron!

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13 hours ago, larchiefeng said:

I know that I sound like a broken record here but, this has to be the most realistic looking paint on the forum! Even with it sitting on the cutting mat it looks like the real thing! Heck of a job Ron!

 

Glad that you like what I am doing with the paint and weathering Wayne....comment is very much appreciated :)

 

Ron

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9 hours ago, Mpfiend said:

 Nice work Ron.

 

regards Keith 

 

Cheers Keith...nice one :)

 

ATB

 

Ron

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Last stage on the throttle assembly before fitting to the main block!

Have made and added some more connectors and cables....and fitted the kit pipes along with the additional wiring.

A very fiddly job to get the kit parts in amongst the added wiring...but brings it all together IMHO.

 

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There are still around 6 more cables to add to the assembly....then it will be ready to join to the main block.

 

Ron

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