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Looks cool, but.... ;) I'd use some darker oil for rust, or add it ontop of the one you used. I usually use combination of burned umber and burned siena, sometimes van dyke brown for very dark one. I do like the aerila job and would appreciate some close ups on the subject, that will probably help to pinpoint the places for touch ups ;) 

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On 12/12/2017 at 6:14 PM, Kris B said:

A W E S O M E.

I am very impressed. Especially the aerials. 

Thanks Kris, looking foward to seeing paint on your's

On 12/12/2017 at 6:16 PM, Alfisti said:

Great work on those pesky cage aerials Nick,very impressive.

Dave.

Cheers Dave

21 hours ago, Clogged said:

Great work.  Thanks for the advice about the aerials.  

 

 

Thanks Clogged, hope it helps, I found them hard work but worth it in the end

19 hours ago, Murdo said:

I am SOOOOOO jealous!!!

 

What a cracking build! The paint job is superb and I love those aerials!  :wub:

 

:mike:

 

I might have to get one of these kits just to try it...

Cheers Murdo, it is a nice kit

9 hours ago, longshanks said:

Stunning!

 

Kev

Thanks Kev

8 hours ago, beefy66 said:

Stunning details on show in this beautiful build. :wow:

 

beefy 

Thanks Beefy

6 hours ago, Michael M said:

Looks cool, but.... ;) I'd use some darker oil for rust, or add it ontop of the one you used. I usually use combination of burned umber and burned siena, sometimes van dyke brown for very dark one. I do like the aerila job and would appreciate some close ups on the subject, that will probably help to pinpoint the places for touch ups ;) 

Cheers Michael - the rust is a couple of colours from an AK set, I'll try a darker one in oil over the top. A bit worried about over doing it as she's modelled in 1907 so only a year or so old!

I'll post some close up of the aerials when they're finished. 

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Happy New Year all!

 

Bit of progress over Christmas;

Added some lighter 'greenery to the hull sides;

38725966394_8db8fb0486_c.jpg

24567947097_e6c9e9c7f8_c.jpg

 

And the aerial cables from the transmitter to the cages;

39403660632_e0da10069c_z.jpg 

The ship's been put away to let the oil paint dry so on with the base. Never tried anything like this before so it'll be fun but I reserve the right to chuck it away and put Dreadnought on a plinth if it looks naff ;)

Supposed to look like this;

24608292007_86d3527604_b.jpg

Base is made with the outline of dry dock pastes to the bottom;

24567950527_8d4ab977ab_c.jpg

39433937021_97cb76fde3_c.jpg

24567947967_8b4df405df_z.jpg 

 

And some templates made for the dry dock side to get uniform sections;

27656883079_a96fb09020_z.jpg

27656878969_371d2024de_c.jpg

 

Made a jig and on with the dray dock walls;

39433939391_7a4d6dd2a6_z.jpg

 

Lower walls fitted;

39403659722_92114bfe93_z.jpg

 

And plastic coving for the curved sections;

39433938191_864afcf393_z.jpg

 

Cheers

 

Nick

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Can't wait for finish. The base looks interesting - dry dock expose the whole hull. 

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Hi Nick,

Cracking model and the drydock base looks promising!

You may know this already, but there would be at least two more rows of blocks either side of the keel blocks under the hull, to support the midship flat bottomed section, and keep her ballanced on an even keel.

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7 minutes ago, Dave Swindell said:

Hi Nick,

Cracking model and the drydock base looks promising!

You may know this already, but there would be at least two more rows of blocks either side of the keel blocks under the hull, to support the midship flat bottomed section, and keep her ballanced on an even keel.

Thanks Dave, I didn't know that, great help. Have you got any pics or idea of spacing?

2 hours ago, Kris B said:

Can't wait for finish. The base looks interesting - dry dock expose the whole hull. 

Cheers Kris. When the sides'll be fully built with the dockyard crane decks it'll be quite a tight fit but we'll see!

 

Cheers

 

Nick

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Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, Nick Charnock said:

Thanks Dave, I didn't know that, great help. Have you got any pics or idea of spacing?

 

Google "dry dock blocks" for loads of pics, meantime here's the layout used for the US battlewaggon Iowa

smqbt45fhhvy.jpg

 

and a closeup of blocks under a ship

Disney-Magic-Dry-Dock-Cadiz-KUB-Paint-Ke

 

Blocks are typically concrete (to stop them floating) with a wooden top (to prevent damage to the hull)

Size wise typically 5 ft high, 4-6 ft wide and 18-24" thick.

Arrangement is a row down the keel, usually more closely spaced at bow and stern, and the outer rows aligned with longitudinal frames in the hull. Typically the block arrangement is altered at each docking so that the hull that was sat on the blocks at the last docking is exposed for treatment during this docking.

 

If you've got the Anatomy of the Ship book on Dreadnaught p86/87 gives a plan of the double bottom showing the longitudinals, there's 5 each side on the bottom, approx equi spaced at midships. 1 (inner), 2 and 3 are pretty much straight, 4 & 5 follow the outer curve of the hull, with 4 being shorter than 5.

For a simple block pattern I'd measure the flat bottom at midships, divide by 10, and place lines of blocks 2/10 & 4/10 divide by 14, and place lines of blocks 4/14 & 6/14 out from midships either side where there is flat bottomed hull.

If you want max accuracy at great expense then you'll want a copy of the docking plan from the National Maritime Museum

Hope that helps

 

Edit 4/1/18 am - looking at the drawing again this morning in daylight I see there is a feint dashed line showing the flat bottomed area, longitundinals 4 & 5 are outside this area (ie they're where the hull starts to curve upwards) and therefore wouldn't be supported by blocks. Revised calculation above will place blocks under 2nd & 3rd longitudinals out from the  keel. If you want a 3rd row either side this would be under the 1st longitudinal out at 2/14 of the midships flat bottomed measurement.

Edited by Dave Swindell
Misread drawings last night

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The ship is looking great, and the base is just going to bottom it right out! Awesome.

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On 03/01/2018 at 9:54 PM, Dave Swindell said:

 

Google "dry dock blocks" for loads of pics, meantime here's the layout used for the US battlewaggon Iowa

smqbt45fhhvy.jpg

 

and a closeup of blocks under a ship

Disney-Magic-Dry-Dock-Cadiz-KUB-Paint-Ke

 

Blocks are typically concrete (to stop them floating) with a wooden top (to prevent damage to the hull)

Size wise typically 5 ft high, 4-6 ft wide and 18-24" thick.

Arrangement is a row down the keel, usually more closely spaced at bow and stern, and the outer rows aligned with longitudinal frames in the hull. Typically the block arrangement is altered at each docking so that the hull that was sat on the blocks at the last docking is exposed for treatment during this docking.

 

If you've got the Anatomy of the Ship book on Dreadnaught p86/87 gives a plan of the double bottom showing the longitudinals, there's 5 each side on the bottom, approx equi spaced at midships. 1 (inner), 2 and 3 are pretty much straight, 4 & 5 follow the outer curve of the hull, with 4 being shorter than 5.

For a simple block pattern I'd measure the flat bottom at midships, divide by 10, and place lines of blocks 2/10 & 4/10 divide by 14, and place lines of blocks 4/14 & 6/14 out from midships either side where there is flat bottomed hull.

If you want max accuracy at great expense then you'll want a copy of the docking plan from the National Maritime Museum

Hope that helps

 

Edit 4/1/18 am - looking at the drawing again this morning in daylight I see there is a feint dashed line showing the flat bottomed area, longitundinals 4 & 5 are outside this area (ie they're where the hull starts to curve upwards) and therefore wouldn't be supported by blocks. Revised calculation above will place blocks under 2nd & 3rd longitudinals out from the  keel. If you want a 3rd row either side this would be under the 1st longitudinal out at 2/14 of the midships flat bottomed measurement.

Thanks for the great info Dave, I had no idea.

I thought it was one line and the sides would be propped with timber for stability - probably would have fallen over!

More blocks needed :D

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19 hours ago, Thom216 said:

The ship is looking great, and the base is just going to bottom it right out! Awesome.

Thanks Thom, we'll see how the base turns out................

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Superb, theres something to catch the eye every where you look, wonderfull details, 

This doesn't help resist the draw to build a ship kit

Glynn 

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Great concept, looking forward to its realization.

Listen to @Dave Swindell he's got it right. How far you want to go when a lot of it will be hidden is up to you. At least it will show others how to do it.....

 

A pet hate of mine is vessels shown resting on blocks of wood the size of houses with a grain pattern like the M25. :analintruder:

 

Kev

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33 minutes ago, longshanks said:

Great concept, looking forward to its realization.

Listen to @Dave Swindell he's got it right. How far you want to go when a lot of it will be hidden is up to you. At least it will show others how to do it.....

 

A pet hate of mine is vessels shown resting on blocks of wood the size of houses with a grain pattern like the M25. :analintruder:

 

Kev

Thanks for seconding my post Kev.:)

Giant blocks is a pet hate of mine too, I'd rather see a full hull perched on a couple of brass finials - at least you know they're just there to support the model.

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On ‎11‎/‎01‎/‎2018 at 5:13 AM, Hewy said:

Superb, theres something to catch the eye every where you look, wonderfull details, 

This doesn't help resist the draw to build a ship kit

Glynn 

Cheers Glynn, they are good fun!

On ‎11‎/‎01‎/‎2018 at 8:08 AM, longshanks said:

Great concept, looking forward to its realization.

Listen to @Dave Swindell he's got it right. How far you want to go when a lot of it will be hidden is up to you. At least it will show others how to do it.....

 

A pet hate of mine is vessels shown resting on blocks of wood the size of houses with a grain pattern like the M25. :analintruder:

 

Kev

Thanks Kev - totally agree, great info from Dave, Evergreen arrived today for the blocks!

 

Slowly progressing with the dock.

I got a bit lazy and decided to see how straight bits looked at the bow end;

 

24778633367_70c947b725_z.jpg

 

But wasn't happy so it had to come out. Brought a new toy to cut the curves;

39617068182_ca791d32a3_z.jpg

 

And made new sections;

24778632477_40eda77481_z.jpg

 

 

Which don't look too bad but I need more practise with the saw;

39647426441_7618d075ed_c.jpg

24778631817_b452ff2c1b_z.jpg

 

Cheers

 

Nick

 

 

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On ‎11‎/‎01‎/‎2018 at 8:08 AM, longshanks said:

Great concept, looking forward to its realization.

Listen to @Dave Swindell he's got it right. How far you want to go when a lot of it will be hidden is up to you. At least it will show others how to do it.....

 

A pet hate of mine is vessels shown resting on blocks of wood the size of houses with a grain pattern like the M25. :analintruder:

 

Kev

 

I've been told (somewhere that wasn't Britmodeller) that model ships posed on rows of wooden sticks is "far more realistic" than mounting them on brass pedestals as I sometimes do :blahblahblah:

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Either works for me as long as it's done properly !

 

I would say though for my money brass pedestals are for the pristine museum piece

 

Kev

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Nice progress so far Nick, new tools take a bit of practice to get the best out of them.

3 hours ago, Jamie @ Sovereign Hobbies said:

 

I've been told (somewhere that wasn't Britmodeller) that model ships posed on rows of wooden sticks is "far more realistic" than mounting them on brass pedestals as I sometimes do :blahblahblah:

I don't think it is, but if someone wants to do that with  their model thats up to them.

 

1 hour ago, longshanks said:

Either works for me as long as it's done properly !

 

I would say though for my money brass pedestals are for the pristine museum piece

 

Kev

I'd tend to agree,  a pristine small scale model is almost a model of the shipbuilders model and looks more "right" than a weathered one, especially if theres figures on it. If you're going to all the trouble of doing this it should also be displayed in some form of realistic setting. This is where Nick is to be commended for attempting a full drydock base

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1 hour ago, Dave Swindell said:

Nice progress so far Nick, new tools take a bit of practice to get the best out of them.

I don't think it is, but if someone wants to do that with  their model thats up to them.

 

I'd tend to agree,  a pristine small scale model is almost a model of the shipbuilders model and looks more "right" than a weathered one, especially if theres figures on it. If you're going to all the trouble of doing this it should also be displayed in some form of realistic setting. This is where Nick is to be commended for attempting a full drydock base

Hi Dave - that's kind of the way I look at it, if it's weathered and got figures on it then it looks nice in a realistic setting. As it's a full hull I thought a dry dock would be an interesting project (and test!)

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Progress on the dry dock.

Lots of little support blocks for the crane rails;

25849063778_a8e14893c3_b.jpg

Fitted;

38957073395_a33a5b2ca2_c.jpg

Side walls made up with the jig;

38957072975_ed53538d19_c.jpg

And fitted;

38957072295_a3f9a16279_b.jpg

38957071445_33d15f4dae_b.jpg 

First top run fitted;

24986018717_88a2b5ecc0_c.jpg

And the second with some reinforcing behind and the cavities in the walls preshaded and a few more curved sections at the bow;

28077994609_e4a0771e40_c.jpg

Comparison to the real thing;

38958550385_cab20605d1_b.jpg

 

Cheers

 

Nick

 

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Yes a very good representation so far nick

Glynn 

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