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What are you reading?

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4 minutes ago, Darby said:

Just finished 'The Complete History of Rivets and how to count them.' by Drivel Troll.  Just about to start 'Cardboard boxes and how they open: the contentious issue' by H.O.O Cares.

 

Don't forget to check out 'Blind rivets and how to model them' by Cherry Max (bit of a saucy minx if you ask me).

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3 minutes ago, Darby said:

Just finished 'The Complete History of Rivets and how to count them.' by Drivel Troll.  Just about to start 'Cardboard boxes and how they open: the contentious issue' by H.O.O Cares.

Just finished a book by him called 'how to build diecast airliners out of cardboard...Who's H O O Cares,...

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How Can Man Die Better : The Secrets of Isandlwana Revealed by Colonel Mike Snook.

it's literally a blow by blow account of the battle from the perspective of a soldier.

It covers the fight by the men of the 24th and how, and where they died.

my favourite passage is:

 

 

All along the rocky ridge, the cry to “fix bayonets!" Was raised.

A British soldier is trained to know that when this order is given by his officers, he is about to experience the supreme human ordeal, a hand-to-hand fight, in which the man who can unleash the most primeval aggression is the man who will prevail.

The order to fix bayonets invariably causes an adrenaline surge. Men steel themselves to the fray; they know there will be no rules, that it is kill or be killed; their vocal cords raise an involuntary and guttural growl; their faces harden to the scowling and ferocious features of demons.

There are few things on this earth as terrifying as a British infantryman with a levelled bayonet.

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33 minutes ago, TheBaron said:

Is it fiction or non-fiction Trevor? You don't say...

If you've bought a house in the last few years with a mortgage, you're part of the cast of characters.

 

I can't tell you how exciting it is. No, I literally can't tell you. Flying freeholds, possessory titles, leases coming to the end of their term. 

 

All human life is down the road having a pint.

 

Trevor  Medium ad Filum

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34 minutes ago, Max Headroom said:

If you've bought a house in the last few years with a mortgage, you're part of the cast of characters.

 

 

That should be printed on the cover of the next edition as one of those review straplines.

 

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On 2017-6-14 at 0:18 PM, T7 Models said:

 

Completed said volume yesterday. Made me realise how little I knew about submarine ops, and how much they do that nobody ever gets to hear about. At the risk of sounding political, the next time anybody rants about the expense of Trident, casually tell them that it costs 1.5% of the annual UK benefits bill.

 

Now on to White Heat: A History of Britain in the Swinging Sixties 1964-1970 by Dominic Sandbrook, the follow up to his Never Had It So Good. Enjoyed that one, so hoping this one will be as good.

 

 

Dominic Sandbrook not only writes a Damon good book, he is a very good presenter on tv especially of his own books. (He knows his subject : -) )

 

I've got these to read, in fact all of his volumes on Britain to the '80's, and his book on British culture, The Dream Factory.

 

 

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1 hour ago, HL-10 said:

How Can Man Die Better : The Secrets of Isandlwana Revealed by Colonel Mike Snook.

it's literally a blow by blow account of the battle from the perspective of a soldier.

It covers the fight by the men of the 24th and how, and where they died.

my favourite passage is:

 

 

All along the rocky ridge, the cry to “fix bayonets!" Was raised.

A British soldier is trained to know that when this order is given by his officers, he is about to experience the supreme human ordeal, a hand-to-hand fight, in which the man who can unleash the most primeval aggression is the man who will prevail.

The order to fix bayonets invariably causes an adrenaline surge. Men steel themselves to the fray; they know there will be no rules, that it is kill or be killed; their vocal cords raise an involuntary and guttural growl; their faces harden to the scowling and ferocious features of demons.

There are few things on this earth as terrifying as a British infantryman with a levelled bayonet.

 

Agreed, an excellent read.  I hope you're going to follow it up with 'Like Wolves on the Fold', Col. Snook's account of Rorkes Drift.  An equally rivetting account.  Colonel Snook knows his stuff, but having served in the Royal Regiment of Wales, so he should!  :)

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Riddle of the Sands by Erskine Childers, it is great! Apparently the founder of the 'Spy Thriller' genre.

 

Ray

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2 hours ago, HL-10 said:

 

There are few things on this earth as terrifying as a British infantryman with a levelled bayonet.

One of which would be a Zulu warrior with a levelled Assegai.

Steve.

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11 hours ago, Ray S said:

Riddle of the Sands by Erskine Childers, it is great! Apparently the founder of the 'Spy Thriller' genre.

Childers' own life is every bit of an extraordinary tale Ray if you can get hold of a decent biography.

Tony

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Just started 'Redcoat' by the late Richard Holmes. Seems an appropriate day to start it; Waterloo 202 years ago today.

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After reading one of the classics ('On The Road' which I found dated), I gave up and decided to read collections on topics that interest me.

Currently reading "The End is Nigh", which so far isn't half as good as 'Wastelands : Stories of the Apocalypse'. But I will finish reading it, as I usually do. A book has to be really bad for me to give up.

 

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I found Fate is the Hunter by Earnest K Gann,

in the Works for three pounds this morning.

No doubt others have mentioned this one?

 

If you've read and enjoyed Chickenhawk by Robert Mason,

then you can consider this almost as if written by his Grandfather*.

It starts with an introduction into flying in the USA in the thirties

in the DC2/DC3 and goes on from there into WW2.

 

Waiting for my car to be fixed, I could not put this book down!

 

*It's as good, if not better than Chickenhawk.

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Finished a while ago... no idea why i picked it up but so glad i did.

 

Lost in Shangri-La

 

Absolutely fantastic true story of a plane that crashed on a site seeing tour in New Guinea (now Indonesia) in 1945 with 24 onboard sadly only 3 survived the crash... what they encountered and what followed is a fascinating read... and this is the crazy idea of how to get them out that went...

 

Well i'll let you find out.

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Posted (edited)

"One of Our Submarines" by Edward Young, picked up a year or so back at a charity book fair, an easy book to get into & really interesting.

Steve.

Edited by stevehnz

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I saw some £1 specials on the Kindle store a few days ago and got " They gave me a Seafire " which somehow I had missed in the past, very enjoyable so far.

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On 2017-6-21 at 3:24 AM, Crane said:

After reading one of the classics ('On The Road' which I found dated), I gave up and decided to read collections on topics that interest me.

Currently reading "The End is Nigh", which so far isn't half as good as 'Wastelands : Stories of the Apocalypse'. But I will finish reading it, as I usually do. A book has to be really bad for me to give up.

 

 

I'm the same. I will try and give a book every chance but sometimes, as you say, I have come across a really bad book and have binned it.

 

Fortunately it happens rarely, but recent examples were Gone Girl, Lisey's story (by Stephen King), and Cloud Atlas.

 

And currently reading Canada by Richard Ford and Churchill's ministry of Ungentlemanly warfare.

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Posted (edited)
36 minutes ago, Whofan said:

currently reading...   ...and Churchill's ministry of Ungentlemanly warfare

 

Recommend The Secret War by Max Hastings, it gives a fairly objective review of the combatant nations intelligence/espionage organisations during WWII, its amazing what some of the organisations achieved in spite of themselves.

Edited by Wez

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British Racing and Record Breaking Aircraft.  

I don't "do" War.

 

Martin

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Just finished The Death of Money by Frederick Taylor, a fascinating study of German post WW1 hyperinflation and the Weimar government.  I know it sounds dry but it isn't. Taylor is an engaging and approachable writer whose occasional flashes of droll humour made me chuckle. Apart from explaining the economics and the frequently murderous politics of the time, he shows how this period led to the rise of Hitler and he even brings the story up to date with the Greek debt crisis.  Recommended to anyone with an interest in 20th century social history.

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Currently reading Above us the Waves, story of midget submarines and human torpedoes.

 

All the best Chris

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3 hours ago, Wez said:

 

Recommend The Secret War by Max Hastings, it gives a fairly objective review of the combatant nations intelligence/espionage organisations during WWII, its amazing what some of the organisations achieved in spite of themselves.

 

Wez,

 

Thanks, it's in the to read stash!

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I am getting through 'The Midnight Watch' by David Dyer.

 

An historical novel concerning the SS Californian and her inaction when the Titanic was lost. I found it quite fascinating bearing in mind it is BASED on real life but is fiction.

 

Ray

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