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CrazyCrank

Pocher Bugatti T50 Coupé de Ville: a resurrection

462 posts in this topic

12 minutes ago, Roy vd M. said:

Looks like a nice lathe set, congratulations. I think the PD230 is an excellent choice. 

 

Meanwhile you've been working very diligently, in my view. 

 

32480310533_3549625503_c.jpg

 

Now you're just polarizing :D 

 

You're right, @Roy vd M., actually my posts are very exhaustive :)

 

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With polarizing I meant, having people favor your own part by comparing it to Pocher's part, and having people depreciate Pocher's part by comparing it to your part. 

 

It's an unnecessarily difficult way of saying "what a great job and what a difference it makes". 

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1 hour ago, Roy vd M. said:

With polarizing I meant, having people favor your own part by comparing it to Pocher's part, and having people depreciate Pocher's part by comparing it to your part. 

 

It's an unnecessarily difficult way of saying "what a great job and what a difference it makes". 

Thanks @Roy vd M. for this explanation...My english is so bad that I didn't understood what you meant ! shame on me !!

And I answered you, playa=ing with words, melting english and french senses with "exhaust"

Many thanks however for your compliment :)

 

 

Edited by CrazyCrank

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Very grateful thanks to @PROPELLER for his outstanding contribution to my rear exhaust pipe

As everyone here knows, my solution for this strongly bended tube was rather wobbly, and I havn't yet the needed tools to scratch a correctly bended tube.(It will be made since a few weeks, with my future lathe :))

 

PROPELLER did it for me, and I have no word to thank him as he deserves it.

 

Dry fit to show you..The mounting bracket on the fuel tank will be modifed (scratch built probably)

 

33371613931_c30b7b21f9_c.jpg

 

 

33116883440_2fcc0c30d1_b.jpg

Edited by CrazyCrank
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Hi chaps

 

Finally, I got yesterday my old lathe Proxxon PD230, 

600 km to get it near Paris :o

 

It need a good cleaning and greasing, and for that, I have to unmount it entirely.

There's some pressure points while turning the knobs by hands, due  - I think - to the accumulation of dust, old grease and metal particles in the mechanisms.

However, while using the self-feeding, there's no pressure point neither strange noise.

The 3-jaw chuck turns evenly.

A quick test turning a brass rod to reduce its diameter, and make its end clean and flat has been succdessfull

 

Contrary to what I thought, looking at the pictures of the sale advertisement, it doesn't come with as many tools I wrote a few posts ago

 

So I have these extras: 

 

- A 4 independent jaws chuck

- A gear 10 mm drilling chuck MK1

- 8 collet ER 20 set 

- A non-conventional home-made centre turning attachment

- A fixed steady for long pieces

- A set of pignons for threading

- A set of replacement belts

- Several drill bits

- Shims and flanges

- a dozen of cutting and threading tools HSS Steel, but not all 8x8 mm

- It lacks the usual and more used cutting tools, and centre drilling bits

- There is a lot of non-conventional tools or devices  whose usefulness  Iis unknown (by me at least )

 

I'll take some pictures to show you, and if anyone here would have an idea of the purpose for which they were made, I'll pay him a beer :)

 

So, I've ordered yesterday evening: 

 

- A five-piece set Proxxon 24530 of usual cutting tools 8x8x80 Cobalt HSS Steel

- A three-piece thread cuting set Proxxon 24540 

- And a six set of centre drilling bits

 

I need too, and will buy later

-  a radius cutting attachment 24062

- A die holder for round dies  proxxon 24082

 

To be continued

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I had to take apart my lathe too. Old grease tends to form a plaque so I cleaned the threads and the guides of the support, cross support and top support, making sure that all old grease was gone.

I bought a big jar of grease and greased everything that needed grease.

Don't know how Proxxon documents it, but the Emco manual of my Compact 8 was quite clear in what needed to be greased and what needs to be oiled.

I also cleaned all the belt wheels as there was a lot of black goo on them and consequently on the belts (which should not be there).

Lastly i removed all gears that drive the feed and cleaned them.

Afterward I greased the teeth lightly. Reminder: if you install them again, make sure that you put a piece of paper between the teeth, otherwise you might push the gears too much against each other causing unwanted wear.

 

If you take apart the supports, at installation time you need get rid of the play on the supports and the handles. The documentation should tell you how you can do that.

 

Do you have a quick exchange tool holder? That makes life so much easier. You can change from one tool bit to the other without having to think about tool height.

If you don't, you might want to look into acquiring one.

 

 

 

 

 

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Thanks a lot, Pouln, for your explanations

The quick tool exchange holder is planned too, I just forgot to mention it :)

 

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Ad promised, a few pictures of a set of extra non-conventional tools, whose usefulness isn't clear...

 

First: this one ....

 

33430722771_1a15bfd5b0_z.jpg

 

Would it be a home-made centre turning attachment ?

 

Second, this one...

 

32716057614_262154c016_z.jpg

 

33559352425_d400007f3b_z.jpg

 

Would it be a home-made "four-jaw " chuck ?

 

Third, this one:

 

33402791312_af18b72668_z.jpg

 

I've no idea !

 

Fourth, this last one

 

33402791122_cc2eab05c1_z.jpg

 

No idea !

 

If anyone here coud help me, it would be much appreciated :)

 

 

 

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I think the second might be, as you say, a home-made four jaw (four bolt) independent 'chuck'. 

 

The third thing is, I think, another chuck. It could be a home-made holder for a cutting saw. Not a bad idea! If you want to cut a 1m. long piece of brass or aluminium into workable parts of 10cm. each, you'll need something to cut them with. 

 

I guess the previous owner found a cutting saw blade with four holes where the bolts are (or he drilled them himself). 

 

Edit: another possibility of #3 is that of a manually driven thread cutter, to be mounted on the tailstock. That only applies if it fits the corresponding thread cutting disks.  I mean these:

 

$_3.JPG?set_id=2 

Edited by Roy vd M.
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I can do some guessing but frankly, I have no idea.

All parts have a "neck". Does this fit the tailstock?

If the holes on the upper left part of number 1 line up with the mounting holes on the 3 or 4 jaw chuck (or any other clamping device that is available for the Proxxon), it might be that the previous owner wanted it mounted free running on an adapter for the tailstock.

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I wouldn't spend a lot of time trying to figure out what those items are. They look to be specially made for certain procedures and the reasons may not be understood by other machinists. I can see no good use for them , the " 4 jaw (BOLTS) chuck" could not be that, if you put something in that and fed a tool bit into it it would tear out pretty much immediately.

Looks to be made with care , by someone who thought they were making useful tooling with the best of intentions  ,but may have been mistaken. The best way would be to ask the person who made them if possible.

Work is ongoing here in a stellar fashion.

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I do agree with krow113... They look as "resumption" tools. Reprise in french, to finishing some special pieces...

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