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Beardie

How many of you have Wingnut Wings kits in your stash? and Why if not

  

194 members have voted

  1. 1. How many Wingnut Wings kits in your stash?

    • The complete range
      3
    • A considerable number
      62
    • One just to see what they're like/try them out
      32
    • None not interested in WWI subjects
      19
    • None they are too expensive
      22
    • None rigging puts me off bi-planes
      4
    • None they are too big
      29
    • None but becoming very tempted
      18
    • Would love them all but not financially possible
      5


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Sandbagger    263
Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, redcap said:

Great mancave!

 

I am interested to know however how the angle of the built and displayed models doesn't (seemingly) put quite a lot of adverse structural strain and potential stress on the fragile kit undercarriage units? You must have pinned or secured them well and I would be interested to learn how you did it?

 

Congratulations on a great layout and for sharing the pics!

 

Regards.

Gary

 

Hi Gary,

Yes the wheels are pinned to the base.

I drill a 0.8 mm hole into each tyre and into these CA glue a cut length of standard paper clip wire. Then locate each wheel on the model undercarriage and position the model onto the base. Align to pins so they are vertical to the base and mark their positions.  Remove the model and drill 1.0 mm holes through the base covering into the acrylic base. Then apply CA glue to each tyre pin and carefully position the model and gently push into the base holes.  If there is sufficient 'meat' on the tail skid, I would do the same there (3 pin attachments).  I usually apply thin CA glue to the joints between wheels and undercarriage to add extra strength.

As Wingnut Wings models are true to scale, the undercarriages do flex under the weight of the model (even a single seater).  I avoid this by rigging the model with 0.12 mm monofilament (fishing line), which adds strength to the structure.  If any line is slack, it can be tightened by applying heat from a soldering iron, close to and along the line.  This shrinks the line and tightens it in the process.

 

Edited by Sandbagger

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Sandbagger    263
14 hours ago, Howlindawg said:

That's a nice cave to hibernate in for the winter.

Like the Damon Hill print too!

Hmmm - I drove around Silverstone in a Formula Ford single seater.  It was capable of 130 MPH, but I'm 6' 4" and even the largest they had wasn't big enough.  I couldn't change gear or clutch/brake properly, so ended up staying in gear and steering as best I could. Came in 13th out of 14 !!!

Not exactly Damon Hill but still a good experience.

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redcap    341

Sandbagger - Thank you for the kind and informative feedback.

Cheers!

Gary

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Howlindawg    479
7 hours ago, Sandbagger said:

Hmmm - I drove around Silverstone in a Formula Ford single seater.  It was capable of 130 MPH, but I'm 6' 4" and even the largest they had wasn't big enough.  I couldn't change gear or clutch/brake properly, so ended up staying in gear and steering as best I could. Came in 13th out of 14 !!!

Not exactly Damon Hill but still a good experience.

 

I've never driven around Silverstone but have managed a trackday in Brands Hatch (on two wheels, not four).

The last time I was in Silverstone was 1999 when Schumacher crashed out straight in front of us at Stowe and Damon took 5th in the Jordan.

 

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Sandbagger    263

Well well - I was at Silverstone in 1999 at the same race.  We were at the start of the pit straight so saw him crash out on the large screens.  I remember the crowd roaring with delight - however it went a bit quieter once we knew he was injured.

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Sandbagger    263
On 06/01/2017 at 0:19 PM, Sandbagger said:

 

Hi Gary,

Yes the wheels are pinned to the base.

I drill a 0.8 mm hole into each tyre and into these CA glue a cut length of standard paper clip wire. Then locate each wheel on the model undercarriage and position the model onto the base. Align to pins so they are vertical to the base and mark their positions.  Remove the model and drill 1.0 mm holes through the base covering into the acrylic base. Then apply CA glue to each tyre pin and carefully position the model and gently push into the base holes.  If there is sufficient 'meat' on the tail skid, I would do the same there (3 pin attachments).  I usually apply thin CA glue to the joints between wheels and undercarriage to add extra strength.

As Wingnut Wings models are true to scale, the undercarriages do flex under the weight of the model (even a single seater).  I avoid this by rigging the model with 0.12 mm monofilament (fishing line), which adds strength to the structure.  If any line is slack, it can be tightened by applying heat from a soldering iron, close to and along the line.  This shrinks the line and tightens it in the process.

 

 Hi Gary,

As an afterthought you can buy white metal undercarriages in different scales from Scale Aircraft Conversions (SAC).

I have some on order but have not tried them yet.

These would certainly add structural strength.

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redcap    341

Sandbagger.

 

Thanks for the links (Great Tripe article!) and an explanation of the technique. That was very kind of you.

 

Re the SAC units. I would exercise caution as the set I bought for the Roden 1/32 Alb DIII was cast in a very soft pewter type metal and it was actually flexing and bending as I held it. IMHO not even as strong as the plastic parts. I rejected my set and the shop kindly gave me a full refund

 

I would check yours very carefully as other modellers I have spoke to on this matter have also had like issues with SAC units; I think with WW1 stuff it is the fidelity of scale and the really soft metal used which renders the metal units of questionable value over the plastic kit parts. Doubtless others may disagree.

 

Regards.

Gary

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I really do not like the SAC undercarriage sets, at least for the wwi aircraft. As Gary says above, they're soft. I find them worse than Roden or WNW plastic. Plastic is, at least, plastic, so if it bends you stand a chance of it recovering. SAC u/c legs don't. Neither do they provide any more detail than the kit parts.  About the only fix I've seen that works is structural rigging with  monofilament. Problem there is that if you've used one of the lycra type threads for the rest of the rigging it will look too different. So far, whenever I've used EZline or Aeroclub thread I've used it for the legs as well, and although flexible it does add a tiny bit of stability if tensioned highly. So far, although I have the odd alarming wobble due to inadvertant knocks, I've never had a leg break (I've about 15 WNW and Roden 1/32nd models built).

 

Paul.

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Beardie    4,499

I have to agree with Paul and Gary. The white metal stuff doesn't solve the problem and is liable to sag with time as well and I have found that the monofil definitely 'tightens up' the undercarriage making it considerably more rigid. Having a few kits done with both options it is night and day between monofil (I used 'smolke' invisible mending thread) and EZLine.

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Sandbagger    263
Posted (edited)

Hmmm - I'll take note and check when they arrived.  I must admit I'd read of some misgivings regards the soft white metal but thought I'd see for myself.

As I said I've not had any problems thus far using monofilament.

I also have two tools from Albion Alloys (The Cutter and the Strutter), which is basically a flexible jaw arrangement to be used in a vice.  Seemingly you slide a length of their solid rod through a length of their tube, then crush it in a vice using the Strutter jaws.

It's supposed to form an aerofoil shape around the rod to make a metal strut, with the exposed rod ends for attachment to the model.  I bought this as I'd read the struts on the larger Wingnut kits (Gotha, Felixstowe, AEG etc) struggle to support the weight of the completed model.

Again, I've to try these tools out.

 

http://modelskills.co.uk/tools/45-the-strutter.html

Edited by Sandbagger

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Col.    5,016

While I'm not particularly 'in to' First World War subjects I'm highly tempted by the WNW Snipe. If they ever move onto Interwar RAF stuff I'm in trouble though!

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MikeR    1,038

They look good, but if they were 1/48 rather than 1/32 I'd probably have at least one of the German C types in my stash. 1/32 is just too big!

 

Mike.:)

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iSteve    70

Every now and again, I get the urge to tackle a WWI subject, and so I added two Eduard 1/48 kits to the stash - the Camel and Dr.I. Like many on this thread, 1/32 is not my scale, but I was intrigued by all the praise these kits received, so I took the plunge and bought the Pfalz D. IIIa since it was apparently a good starter kit. Due to some shipping confusion, I ended up with two. I then came to the realization how much more expensive they can be once Weta and retailers sell out, so I bought the Albatros D.Va (OAW) and the Sopwith Triplane (by stroke of luck, HLJ had it listed after WNW had sold out). I've got the Camel on order from Hannants, and the Fokker E. IV is next in my sights. I doubt I will buy the whole series, but once I actually tackle one of these kits, my needs may change. I definitely intend to buy the Early Felixstowe either late this year or early next year as I see it as the HMS Victory kit of aircraft models - huge, plenty of rigging and requiring a decent amount of skill to do it justice.

I think for me, the draw to these beautiful kits was the thoughtful effort, attention to detail and brilliant engineering. Without having built one, you just want to have a few around just out of appreciation for such great kits.

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Beardie    4,499

Hah! you have been grabbed by the Wingnuts :D Even in their boxes they are little gems and, let's face it, there will never be kits produced of these aircraft that will outshine these kits. Once they are in the stash you don't need to build them now or even soon but you will know that you have them for when the time is right.

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iSteve    70
4 hours ago, Beardie said:

Hah! you have been grabbed by the Wingnuts :D Even in their boxes they are little gems and, let's face it, there will never be kits produced of these aircraft that will outshine these kits. Once they are in the stash you don't need to build them now or even soon but you will know that you have them for when the time is right.

Yup.

The only thing that annoys me is the shipping. Living in Canada, Weta ships to me from their warehouse in the US. However, I've received kits faster from the EU warehouse than the US (which led to the double shipping), the shipping rates WNW charges from the US is a bit outrageous, and on top of it all, I have to pay customs. WNW kits are the only models I've ever paid customs on. Ever. It can be cheaper for me to buy from HLJ: the price may be higher, but the shipping charges are much lower, though I still have paid customs.

 

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iSteve    70

I realise rigging isn't fun. I'm certainly not a fan. But in the last couple of years, I've come to engage with this hobby most when I've learned something new, when I can improve my skills and grow as a modeller - when I'm challenged. So, as intimidating as some of these kits are, I look on them as the epitome of aircraft building in the same way as wooden sailing ships are to ship builders, especially those who typically do modern vessels. My Wingnut Wings kits will sit in the stash for a while until I have grown as a modeller to take on a new challenge. I highly encourage others to do the same and challenge themselves.

With this in mind, I'm very thankful these are available in 1/32. My two Eduard kits in 1/48 are more intimidating because of their size. 1/72? Not a chance. That's why I broke from my preferred scale to 1/32 - just for these kits only. Besides, they're just beautiful kits.

I completely agree with what a few in this thread have said about these planes. It was the beginning of warplanes and to see some of the contraptions some pilots strapped themselves to and then added the fun of bullets, you really have to admire their bravery. This is why I'm being selective in my WNW kit choices: I want some representative kits of the era, not to just simply buy the whole line. The Pfalz and Albatros planes are the Spitfires of their time - they look cool. The Camel is one of the pinnacles of aircraft in this period. I just bought a Fokker E.I because it looks so flimsy. I have the Sopwith Triplane because, well, it has three wings. I want to buy either the AMC DH.2 or an FE 2b because they look even more pathetic than the Fokker. I want a Gotha because it's a bomber, and I want the Felixstowe/Hansa W.29 duelist kit because the former is huge and looks to me more like a luxury liner, and the latter because it's goofy looking and has pontoons. I might get a Roland C.II because it's a bit of an odd duck with its windows, but beyond these choices, I'm less enthused (not that I would say no if one was given to me). A short list also makes for purchasing relief, both to the wallet and "the hunt."

Edited by iSteve

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Beardie    4,499

Don't forget that the Roland C.II also has curtains on it's windows :mental:Wonder why the observer/gunner needed those...nosy neighbours?

One way or another all these aircraft are very significat. The RE8 served tirelessly over the lines taking photos and observing for the artillery as did the Rumpler and DFW on the other side. The Junkers J.1 was an extraodinary diversion from the standard aviation building process of the time with it's corrugated metal and armoured construction, Albatros B.II was a long serving observer and was without defensive weaponry. The Sopwith Pup was a good answer to the German aircraft at the front when it arrived. Basically, when you actually consider all the aircraft in the range so far, each one is, in it's own way, a ground breaking development in aircraft design.

 

The only one I puzzle over is just why so many variants of the Fokker monoplane are included when there is very little difference between them.

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iSteve    70
8 hours ago, Beardie said:

The only one I puzzle over is just why so many variants of the Fokker monoplane are included when there is very little difference between them.

The E.IV prototype had three guns, which turned out to be one too many, so the production model had two. These are both represented in the E.IV kit. As for I, II and III, there are subtle differences, but mostly I think it's because they were the "Fokker Scourge," leading the air war. That, and there are some nice, different marking schemes.

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Beardie    4,499

I agree they represent an important part in the air war and that the E.IV was noticeably different but I think I will only be building one or possibly two of them for my collection(E.I and E.IV), at least until I have built everything else, as I don't find them terribly inspiring visually.

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PDH    35

Now our house move is complete I've had the time to get all my modelling stuff out of storage and unpacked. Haven't seen most of it for 18 months!

 

My WNW pile!

 

IMG_5068_zpssd9pbzwe.jpg

 

I was fortunate to start buying WNW kits from when they were first released and also to have a daughter who lived in the US. I could order a kit from New Zealand and get it delivered to the US on a regular basis and then on our frequent trips to visit our daughter pick them up and bring them back to the UK, no Parcelforce charge or VAT! Haven't bought a WNW kit for nearly two years but would like an A.E.G. GIV once finances allow and may be a Felixstowe but size is a concern.

 

Do have 3 Camels on pre-order!

 

P

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