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1/48 & 1/72 - DHC-1 Chipmunk by AZ model - box art+schemes+master - 1/72 release March 2017

40 posts in this topic

2 hours ago, Paul J said:

Fantastic!!!  But I don't get the 'T.30' designation for the UK and RCAF one!!!  The Uk based Civvy ones I'm sure were T.22.    Anyway I don't really care 'cos I am gonna get me some !!!

 Yes dont recognise the "T30" ?British military Chipmunks were T10's and British made exports were T20's with civil variants in the 20 series so a bit confused by the AZ boxings. Am sure they will be good kits though and welcome replacements for the Airfix ones. Look forward to this release as plenty of nice colour schemes.

Cheers, Paul

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Looks like one of my exes in the mix there, WZ868/G-BCIW

Which will save me some decal work.

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Really chuffed about this as I assumed the kit was dead in the water. So many schemes, so little time.  That S & M trainer decal sheet is going to be in pretty short supply soon, I would imagine.  Wonder if I'll be able to find a pic of a Liverpool UAS aircraft from the 50s that my dad flew. 

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1 hour ago, Meatbox8 said:

So many schemes, so little time. 

 

Amen, brother.

 

So looking forward to this.

 

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V much looking forward to this, and building at least one of the aircraft I flew in. Xtradecal crack open your colouring pens please!

 

Justin

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I wonder when the 1/48th version will be available?

 

John

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Loving it! But no raised rivets  uh?  There loads on the real aeroplane. Hope they do the correct undercart legs for the RCAF ones and the slightly narrower chord rudders for early models. However there seem to be the anti spin strakes as separate parts for those that had them. Nice touch. But I still would like to know where they got the 'T30' designation from! I have the book 'DHC-1 Chipmunk, The poor man's Spitfire' by various authors with full history of the type but no mention of  a T30 that I can see?????

 

Oh, I hope that Xtradecal do some schemes with silver or LAG and dayglo strips like they did with the JP sheet.

 

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43 minutes ago, Paul J said:

Loving it! But no raised rivets  uh?  There loads on the real aeroplane. Hope they do the correct undercart legs for the RCAF ones and the slightly narrower chord rudders for early models. However there seem to be the anti spin strakes as separate parts for those that had them. Nice touch. But I still would like to know where they got the 'T30' designation from! I have the book 'DHC-1 Chipmunk, The poor man's Spitfire' by various authors with full history of the type but no mention of  a T30 that I can see?????

 

Oh, I hope that Xtradecal do some schemes with silver or LAG and dayglo strips like they did with the JP sheet.

 

Common Paul you have got to be kidding about the rivets....yes we know they are there but really I think that they are not really required. Also to replicate them as raised rivets that in my estimation would have to be no higher than about 0.08mm or 3 thou maybe as little as 2 thou in 1/72 scale is asking a huge amount.

Also the patterns have been hand made so therefore even more 'almost' impossible, added to the fact what happens when the parts are assembled and the joints need sanding etc. how do you replace the rivets that have disappeared?

 

57 minutes ago, jaw said:

I wonder when the 1/48th version will be available?

 

John

John, let us hope it follows on soon after

 

 

Ali

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34 minutes ago, Ali62 said:

Common Paul you have got to be kidding about the rivets....yes we know they are there but really I think that they are not really required. Also to replicate them as raised rivets that in my estimation would have to be no higher than about 0.08mm or 3 thou maybe as little as 2 thou in 1/72 scale is asking a huge amount.

Also the patterns have been hand made so therefore even more 'almost' impossible, added to the fact what happens when the parts are assembled and the joints need sanding etc. how do you replace the rivets that have disappeared?

 

 

 

Ali

Yeah , I was having a 'jape' Of course I realise it would be impractable to replicate those rivets.;) Regardless, I will still buy a few anyway as I love the little aeroplane.  

By the way, I have just been studying my book and it seems the main designation for RCAF Chipmunks was DHC-1B-2-S3 and S5 for late production aircraft for the RCAF that had various little mods. But no sign of the T30 being mentioned anywhere.

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Frog managed the rivets on their Shackleton 40 years ago :wicked:

 

Chris.

 

 

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As did Airfix on their Chipmunk in 1970. However, raised rivets are no longer the fashion even where they are correct and highly recognisable characteristics of the aircraft concerned. The Ju87 is a classic example where the new 1/48 Airfix kit may be what the majority of today's modellers want to see when they open a box (and therefore commercially a smart decision by Airfix), but the older 1/48 Airfix kit is far more realistic in its surface treatment. 

 

Never mind, they are easy enough to add. Rows of rub-down transfer dots is one method, and those can be bought from http://www.archertransfers.com . In 1/48 and above they can be added with a fine hypodermic and well judged dots of PVA or similar adhesive. If you get it wrong you can remove them without any real difficulty and try again. In 1/72 I probably wouldn't bother, but then I'm a lazy modeller.

Edited by Work In Progress

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I am with all of the comments above, and I do agree, however unless done really well (and the kits mentioned above are way overdone), I would rather not have rivets.

Some of the new high quality high tech manufactured kits have amazing surface details raised or scribed, I am all for that, especially in larger  scales but for small 1/72 or 1/48 scale kits I would far rather have a neat accurate (hopefully) model than trying to replicate every minute detail.

If AZ is going to make good and accurate Chipmunks (patterned) by hand for low run injected plastic kits then I will be happy, and so will most modellers.

With all due respect as I have, and I still make, hand made patterns myself I can see asymmetrical shapes and rivets and panels that are already there on the shown patterns, can you imagine what it would look like if a few thousand 'lumps' / rivets were added, the model would be ripped apart by all of us say that it does not look correct.

 

Well done to AZ models for bringing us some new models that if are done well, should sell very well.

 

Ali

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On 2/17/2017 at 0:21 PM, Paul J said:

But I still would like to know where they got the 'T30' designation from! I have the book 'DHC-1 Chipmunk, The poor man's Spitfire' by various authors with full history of the type but no mention of  a T30 that I can see?????

 

According to AJ Jackson in Putnam's "DH Since 1909", the RCAF production was designated Mk 30; although "T 30" may be a misuse.

 

On 2/17/2017 at 1:13 PM, Ali62 said:

However there seem to be the anti spin strakes as separate parts for those that had them. Nice touch.

 

My Dad was instructing on Hull UAS in the early '50s when the Chipmunk spinning issue arose. He met a chap from CFS who was going around the country spinning every Chipmunk in the RAF to establish the differences between individual airframes, as there had been cases of proficient students spinning in. After a morning's flying all the aircraft on the UAS, it was clear that some aircraft could be put into a spiral dive which mimicked the true spin, and obviously, the recovery would be quicker. If the student later entered a real spin, he might not apply the correct recovery action (or at least for long enough). The added anti-spin strakes fixed the flow separation during spinning so that, amongst other things, there was no confusion between the spin and the spiral dive.

 

As an aside, many years ago, my brother Chris and I once did a series of spins on the RAE Aero Club Chipmunk, culminating in a 22-turn spin from 10 000 ft to establish any variation in characteristic as the spin developed. After 8 turns, there was no detectable further development, we were spinning at 40 kt on the asi and all was very quiet and peaceful, losing about 300' per turn. The reason for all this was to gather some data for the Cranfield A-1 aircraft, on which Chris was doing some test/development flying.

 

Kevin

 

Edited by KevinK
Typo
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