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Bobs_Buckles

Werner Voss

9 posts in this topic

91 years ago to the day Werner Voss lost his life in what must be one of the most famous dogfights in aerial combat history.

At 5.45 GMT look to the eastern skies and pay your respects to a man of superb skill and bravery who single-handedly, took on the best pilots of B flight 56 Squadron, Chidlaw Roberts and Hamersley of 60 squadron, with C flight 56 looking on. Voss put bullets into most of them, but the odds were against him. He fell to the guns of Arthur Rhys Davids, B flight 56 squadron.

Werner, I salute you :poppy:

werner1.gif

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91 years ago to the day Werner Voss lost his life in what must be one of the most famous dogfights in aerial combat history.

At 5.45 GMT look to the eastern skies and pay your respects to a man of superb skill and bravery who single-handedly, took on the best pilots of B flight 56 Squadron, Chidlaw Roberts and Hamersley of 60 squadron, with C flight 56 looking on. Voss put bullets into most of them, but the odds were against him. He fell to the guns of Arthur Rhys Davids, B flight 56 squadron.

Werner, I salute you :poppy:

werner1.gif

thanks for posting this Bobert, it prompted me to re-read the relevant passages from Alex Revell's "Brief Glory, The Life of Arthur Rhys Davids" and I can only echo young Arthur's sentiments, as reported by McCudden: "oh, if only I could have brought him down alive!" Voss was one of The Greats.

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on the series Dogfight on the history channel it gives a very good account of this. The animation of this battle is truly awesome and life like

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yr0S0pTVMlU...feature=related

here is the episode

later

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Excellent video. Was the DR.I really that manueverable?

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Excellent video. Was the DR.I really that manueverable?

The replica Dr I's that I have seen are incredibly manouvreable, in fact I would guess that they are inherently unstable and require to be 'flown' hands on 100%. The only criticism I would make of the video is that some of the aircraft speeds look unfeasibly high.

peebeep

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Excellent video. Was the DR.I really that manueverable?
The only criticism I would make of the video is that some of the aircraft speeds look unfeasibly high.

peebeep

This is why in the hands of pilots like Voss or Von Richthofen the plane was very deadly. It could perform very amazing and quick maneuvers and it was of sturdy design

as for the speed on the video l think its about right as they try to duplicate every aspect of the scene as possible which includes pilots prospective and how it would look if you were looking down on the scene as it unfolds. They strive for realism and l think they do very well. Some of the WW2 and jet combat scenes are outstanding

later

Edited by hacker

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Hi Guys

Funny how Voss has almost been overlooked in historical terms until fairly recently and Richthofen always in the forefront. The more you read the more it would seem that the two were completely different characters yet both had a great skill in achieving what had to be done during that period. From what I can gather, and please correct me if i am wrong!, Voss was the more capable pilot, and the Dr1 probably suited his flying style far better than it did Richthofens.

Although the "Red Baron" is always associated with the Triplane, the majority of his kills were in Albatross fighters, the DIII and the DV, and I have always had the impression that he was a great hunter rather than a great flyer. I know the two have to go hand in hand somewhere along the line and he must have had plenty of ability to claim his 80 kills, but somehow I have always felt that Verner Voss 's contribution has been a bit neglected in historical terms

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aint it funny how Von Richtofen actually saw the potential in Werner Voss and chose him to be part of his staffel. And Ernst Udet was of a similar ilk they were all top fighter aces. just think Richtofen was waiting for a fokker DVII before he got shot down. Just finished reading A book about Von Richtofen quite Interesting. my other brother lee reckons that Werner Voss was in the Navy Because he flew a Fokker F.1 and not a Dr1.

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