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RAF Lightnings over Africa (profiles)


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#1 Gekko_1

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 04:51 PM

Here's a couple of Lightning F.6's I've been working on as a possible submission to the "What if?" site Profiles GB. Thought some of you here might be interested? :unsure:

The back story behind them is only basic. The UK and Burkina Faso come to some sort of political/ economical agreement back in 1978 which sees British Petroleum (BP) in Burkina Faso exploring for oil. Oil is found in much larger quantities than anybody ever expected.

Posted Image

The RAF deploys to help secure Burkina Faso's boarders. A neighbouring Hunter is shot down after a brief dogfight. Due to African sentiments the RAF Lightnings are "transferred" into Burkina Faso Air Force hands and markings changed accordingly.

Posted Image

Cheers

Richard.

#2 wkennerley

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 04:58 PM

An interesting whiff, how about Birkina Faso then sell the planes, without telling the RAF, to Rhodesia!! That would then be the que for me to build a Rhodesian Lightning whiff!!

Cheers

Wayne

#3 dylan the rabbit

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 05:43 PM

Love 'em! Really different..

#4 bexwh773

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 06:05 PM

:yahoo: Rich is on form again, I like em Rich :goodjob:

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#5 rdxtnt

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 09:01 PM

Great colour schemes. They'd make very eye-catching models :speak_cool:

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#6 tedtaylor

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 09:05 PM

Burkina Faso?????????

what or where is that for goodness sake

Ted

#7 wkennerley

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 09:08 PM

Burkina Faso?????????

what or where is that for goodness sake

Ted



Burkina Faso is what used to be called Upper Volta

#8 tedtaylor

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 09:10 PM

Burkina Faso is what used to be called Upper Volta

whoever thought up that weird name I wonder
Ted

#9 GreenDragon

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 09:10 PM

Excellent schemes Richard. I've got a Matchbox kit in the stash that I'm not sure what do with! I wonder if Burkina Faso needed some Buccaneer bombers to sort out their pesky neighbours? Pity they're landlocked, we could have flogged them a carrier and some SHARs with all that oil money!

Paul Harrison

Here's a link for Ted Taylor http://en.wikipedia....ki/Burkina_Faso

HTH

Edited by GreenDragon, 26 June 2008 - 09:13 PM.


#10 John

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 09:26 PM

Here's a couple of Lightning F.6's I've been working on as a possible submission to the "What if?" site Profiles GB. Thought some of you here might be interested? :unsure:

The back story behind them is only basic. The UK and Burkina Faso come to some sort of political/ economical agreement back in 1978 which sees British Petroleum (BP) in Burkina Faso exploring for oil. Oil is found in much larger quantities than anybody ever expected.

Posted Image

The RAF deploys to help secure Burkina Faso's boarders. A neighbouring Hunter is shot down after a brief dogfight. Due to African sentiments the RAF Lightnings are "transferred" into Burkina Faso Air Force hands and markings changed accordingly.

Posted Image

Cheers

Richard.


Very nice! What's your take on the colours used for the camouflage?

John

#11 tedtaylor

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 09:28 PM

Excellent schemes Richard. I've got a Matchbox kit in the stash that I'm not sure what do with! I wonder if Burkina Faso needed some Buccaneer bombers to sort out their pesky neighbours? Pity they're landlocked, we could have flogged them a carrier and some SHARs with all that oil money!

Paul Harrison

Here's a link for Ted Taylor http://en.wikipedia....ki/Burkina_Faso

HTH


many thanks for that never heard of it before but then my last geography lesson was in 1952 when half the world map was pink. Gone downhill since then.

Ted

#12 Jon Kunac-Tabinor

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 09:51 PM

OK - first up - very cool schemes - but just to rain on everyones parade here, if we're doing a background to the whif scheme - in 1978 - I dont think the RAF had gone wraparound (they were just on the point of - granted). Also - I'm not sure the RAF has ever really gone in the 3 tone camo schemes.

Given its location - I would have thought that good old 2 tone DE/MS or perhaps even the WW2 DG/MS - "sand and spinach" would have been a better bet - then with the latter you could have have RAF F-6s with the DSG portions of the camo overpainted with mid stone? Undersides - still in silver.

I know, I know, its a Whif - but if you put a background story with it - then I guess I'm allowed a 'Whif colour' question too? :)


Sorry to be a bluestocking here

Jonners

Edited by Jon Kunac-Tabinor, 26 June 2008 - 09:52 PM.


#13 GreenDragon

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 11:12 PM

many thanks for that never heard of it before but then my last geography lesson was in 1952 when half the world map was pink. Gone downhill since then.

Ted


Glad to help Ted, agree it has gone downhill a bit. Countries seem to change their names every five minutes these days!

Paul Harrison

#14 Gekko_1

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Posted 27 June 2008 - 04:14 AM

An interesting whiff, how about Birkina Faso then sell the planes, without telling the RAF, to Rhodesia!! That would then be the que for me to build a Rhodesian Lightning whiff!!

Cheers

Wayne


OK Wayne, what about this...............

Posted Image

Cheers

Richard.

#15 dylan the rabbit

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Posted 27 June 2008 - 05:06 AM

whoever thought up that weird name I wonder
Ted


Some berk..

#16 Gekko_1

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Posted 27 June 2008 - 05:31 AM

Very nice! What's your take on the colours used for the camouflage?

John


Hi John,


'What if's' over Africa is one of my favourite modelling subjects. The reason why is that I can concentrate on my two most loved topics, those being weathering and camouflage schemes. Looking at a satellite map of Burkina Faso showed the typical African mix of dry arid land, in this case landlocked, so I chose colours that would best suit in such a harsh environment, with enough contrast to help break-up the shape of the Lightning whilst on the ground and flying at low level.

Because Africa is such a harsh environment weathering would come into play very early on in the aircrafts operational career. Therefore chipping, re-sprays and paint fading would all be taking place at various times and therefore make for a more interesting model on the display table.

Hope this answers your question.

Cheers

Richard.

#17 keefr22

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Posted 27 June 2008 - 06:28 AM

Hi John,


'What if's' over Africa is one of my favourite modelling subjects. The reason why is that I can concentrate on my two most loved topics, those being weathering and camouflage schemes. Looking at a satellite map of Burkina Faso showed the typical African mix of dry arid land, in this case landlocked, so I chose colours that would best suit in such a harsh environment, with enough contrast to help break-up the shape of the Lightning whilst on the ground and flying at low level.

Because Africa is such a harsh environment weathering would come into play very early on in the aircrafts operational career. Therefore chipping, re-sprays and paint fading would all be taking place at various times and therefore make for a more interesting model on the display table.

Hope this answers your question.

Cheers

Richard.



Well, much as I love looking at the whif's on here, I've never been tempted to build one as there's so much 'real' stuff to do. But that second profile is really making me twitchy - and also having a Matchbox kit in the stash (which will be redundant come the new Trumpy &/or Academy releases) I'm very tempted!!

But, like Jon I'm not sure about the wrapround scheme - especially if their main role is still as air defenders. So, given how bright & sunny it must be in Africa all the time ( :whistle: ), how about the same scheme with azure blue undersides??? Mmmmm......now, where do I find the time to build one??!! (oh, & some Burkino Faso Air Force decals....!!)

Keef

PS do we have a 'groan' emoticon to respond to Dylan................??!!

PPS I also like the Buccaneer idea - the wrapround scheme would be perfect on one of 'em!

#18 Gekko_1

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Posted 27 June 2008 - 07:06 AM

OK - first up - very cool schemes - but just to rain on everyones parade here, if we're doing a background to the whif scheme - in 1978 - I dont think the RAF had gone wraparound (they were just on the point of - granted). Also - I'm not sure the RAF has ever really gone in the 3 tone camo schemes.

Given its location - I would have thought that good old 2 tone DE/MS or perhaps even the WW2 DG/MS - "sand and spinach" would have been a better bet - then with the latter you could have have RAF F-6s with the DSG portions of the camo overpainted with mid stone? Undersides - still in silver.

I know, I know, its a Whif - but if you put a background story with it - then I guess I'm allowed a 'Whif colour' question too? :)


Sorry to be a bluestocking here

Jonners


OK Jon, how about this :hobbyhorse: :wicked: .......................................

Upon arrival in Burkina Faso Wing Commander Oliver Dunn was to asses the environment, flying conditions and suitable camouflage schemes for the twelve Lightnings that were to be deployed.Whilst flying in to Ouagadougou airport as a passenger aboard an RAF C-130 Hercules it became immediately apparent to Dunn that the various schemes used by the RAF over the years would not be terribly effective in Burkina Faso. Most colours appeared to blend into an olive brown shade.

Testing couldn’t begin straight away as conditions on the ground were basic to say the least. Dunn managed to acquire some spray painting gear from a garage in town, along with some local car paint supplies, and began mixing colours and forming a data base of possible candidates. The first three F.6 Lightnings would be arriving in a week’s time so he had to get a move-on. For Dunn, mixing the paints and testing them out on bits of aircraft wreckage found at the airport reminded him of his hobby back home, that being plastic aircraft modelling. Dunn loved his Airfix aircraft kits but realised it would be some months before he could get back to his wife and his ever growing collection of plastic model kits!

Dunn was soon joined by Flight Lieutenant Scott Thomas a very experienced Fighter pilot who had just completed one years exchange with the Rhodesian Air Force and understood well the importance of camouflage and concealment in an ever increasingly complex technological environment. Lessons learned by Communist forces in Vietnam and the Middle East were trickling down into southern Africa, as were pilots from various western nations looking for work as mercenaries for both the money and the thrill of actual combat flying.

So, with Thomas around to assist Dunn a scheme was soon created and as the RAF had reluctantly given Dunn no restrictions, just a ‘get the job done, we have to protect those drilling sites!’ instruction, things progressed quickly. Within a week and a half of the first three Lightnings arriving they were all re-painted in the new three colour scheme. Thomas couldn’t wait to get back into his beloved Lightning and try out the new scheme where it would be used. On the first flight Thomas ordered his pilots to fly in all aspects of combat flying to get a good idea of how effective the new scheme was going to be. It worked! In fact it worked too well! Thomas nearly flew into one of the Lightnings whilst trying some low flying. So some new rules had to be enforced regarding spacing and identifying position etc.

There had been reports of a Merc flown Hunter for some weeks after Dunn had arrived in-country. It was on the very fist Lightning combat sortie that this mysterious Hunter jet was spotted by Thomas. Again the new camouflage scheme proved its worth. Thomas was able to close with the Hunter with the Merc pilot being quite unaware of the predator trailing behind and underneath him. Thomas could see no visible markings on the Hunter. He decided to be a bit cheeky and fly along side the Hunter in an attempt to see if there were any markings on the side of the jet, and to try and get a good look at the pilot of the Hunter.

As soon as Thomas climbed out from behind the Hunter the Merc pilot spotted him! The Hunter jinked aggressively trying to ram into Thomas’s Lightning. Thomas broke away, diving towards the scorching African surface. The Hunter accelerated as best as it could and immediately turned for Niger! Was that where it had come from? Thomas radioed base asking for permission to shoot down the Hunter. Permission was quickly given. Thomas then aggressively turned his metal beast in the direction the fleeing Hunter, heavy vapour hugging his craft forming a temporary cloud giving the jet a mythological shape as the flame of a Red Top missile streaked away towards the fate less craft. Seconds later a huge fireball erupted from the Hunter. The pilot however was able to safely eject. Thomas briefly watched both the remains of the Hunter and the Mercenary pilot descend back to earth. But Thomas couldn’t hand around, he was dangerously short of fuel and would need to get to one of the newly formed forward operating bases urgently or he too would be following the Hunter pilot!

Little did Thomas know at the time, but both he and the Hunter pilot were destined to meet again over the scorching earth of Burkina Faso, only next time the Mercenary pilot would be in a much more capable fighter jet!


Also Jon what is a "bluestocking"? Sorry mate but I'm an Aussie and such a term I've never come across before. :hmmm:

Cheers

Richard.

#19 Nev

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Posted 27 June 2008 - 07:14 AM

Oliver Dunn


Hey, what's my brother doing in your story? ;)

#20 Gekko_1

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Posted 27 June 2008 - 08:02 AM

Well, much as I love looking at the whif's on here, I've never been tempted to build one as there's so much 'real' stuff to do. But that second profile is really making me twitchy - and also having a Matchbox kit in the stash (which will be redundant come the new Trumpy &/or Academy releases) I'm very tempted!!

But, like Jon I'm not sure about the wrapround scheme - especially if their main role is still as air defenders. So, given how bright & sunny it must be in Africa all the time ( :whistle: ), how about the same scheme with azure blue undersides??? Mmmmm......now, where do I find the time to build one??!! (oh, & some Burkino Faso Air Force decals....!!)

Keef

PS do we have a 'groan' emoticon to respond to Dylan................??!!

PPS I also like the Buccaneer idea - the wrapround scheme would be perfect on one of 'em!


Hi Keef,

nice to know that I've almost tempted you! :wicked: If I were you I'd build that Matchbox kit now before you get the Academy/Trumpeter kit, otherwise you'll never ever build that Matchbox kit and nobody will want to buy it off you either! :o

The reason for the wraparound scheme is that when flying at low level as soon as a jet banks to the side it is instantly spotted by the flash of light grey / blue of the underside. Also with the proliferation of surface to air missiles into the region, and prowling MiG's flown by combat experienced Russian pilots, the flying height of choice of the RAF pilots flying over Burkina Faso was 200 feet. Thus the camouflage scheme blended-in very well and the Russians hadn't, by that time, developed good ground clutter discernable radar, so the Lightnings flying that low stood a better chance of survival than at a greater height where they were vulnerable to SAM's and MiG's.

Also the role of the Lightnings in Burkina Faso was one of both air defence and ground attack. Lightnings were deemed suitable by the MOD of the time and the RAF had to make do with that decision. Phantoms and Buccaneers were needed to fulfil their NATO roles and couldn't be spared.

As for Burkina Faso decals, Zots does them:

http://www.aircraftr...zsp1/rev971.htm

Cheers

Richard. (doing his best to defend his whiffs :unsure: )