Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'i-16'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Group Builds
  • Model Show Calendar

Forums

  • Site Help & Support
    • FAQs
    • Help & Support
    • New Members
    • Announcements
  • Aircraft Modelling
    • Military Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Civil Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Aircraft
    • Ready for Inspection - Aircraft
    • Aircraft Related Subjects
  • AFV Modelling (armour, military vehicles & artillery)
    • Armour Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Armour
    • Ready for Inspection - Armour
    • Armour Related Subjects
    • large Scale AFVs (1:16 and above)
  • Maritime Modelling (Ships and subs)
    • Maritime Discussion by era
    • Work in Progress - Maritime
    • Ready for Inspection - Maritime
  • Vehicle Modelling (non-military)
    • Vehicle Discussion
    • Work In Progress - Vehicles
    • Ready For Inspection - Vehicles
  • Science Fiction & RealSpace
    • Science Fiction Discussion
    • RealSpace Discussion
    • Work In Progress - SF & RealSpace
    • Ready for Inspection - SF & RealSpace
  • Figure Modelling
    • Figure Discussion
    • Figure Work In Progress
    • Figure Ready for Inspection
  • Dioramas, Vignettes & Scenery
    • Diorama Chat
    • Work In Progress - Dioramas
    • Ready For Inspection - Dioramas
  • Reviews, News & Walkarounds
    • Reviews
    • Current News
    • Build Articles
    • Tips & Tricks
    • Walkarounds
  • Modelling
    • Group Builds
    • The Rumourmonger
    • Other Modelling Genres
    • Britmodeller Yearbooks
    • Tools & Tips
  • General Discussion
    • Chat
    • Shows
    • Photography
    • Members' Wishlists
  • Shops, manufacturers & vendors
    • Aeroclub Models
    • Air-Craft.net
    • AJ Aviation - Jan & Tony
    • A.M.U.R. Reaver
    • Atlantic Models
    • Bernd.M Modellbau
    • BlackMike Models
    • Casemate UK
    • Collett's Model Shop
    • Copper State Models
    • Creative Models Ltd
    • DACO Products
    • Freightdog Models
    • Gizzmo Heaven
    • Hannants
    • Hobby Colours & Accessories
    • Hobby Paint'n'Stuff
    • Hypersonic Models
    • Iliad Design
    • Japan:Cool
    • Kagero Publishing
    • Kingkit
    • L'Arsenal 2.0
    • Modellingtools.co.uk
    • Maketar Paint Masks
    • Marmaduke Press Decals
    • MikroMir
    • Mirage Hobby
    • MJW Models
    • The Hobby Shack
    • Models4Hobby
    • Models R Go
    • NeOmega & Vector Resin
    • Parkes682Decals
    • Pheon Models
    • Pocketbond Limited
    • Precision Ice and Snow
    • Radu Brinzan Productions
    • Red Roo Models
    • Relish Models
    • SBS Model - Hungary
    • Scale-Model-Kits.com
    • Scale Model Shop Ltd
    • Small Stuff Models
    • Sovereign Hobbies
    • Special Hobby
    • Sphere Products
    • Starling Models
    • Stormfront Models
    • StoryModels.com
    • The Hobby Den
    • The Real Model Shop
    • Thunderbird Models
    • Tiger Hobbies
    • Tirydium Models
    • Topnotch - Bases and Masks for Models
    • Ultimate Modelling Products
    • Valiant Wings Publishing
    • Videoaviation Italy
    • White Ensign Models
    • Wild House Models
    • Wonderland Models
  • Archive
    • 2007 Group Builds
    • 2008 Group Builds
    • 2009 Group Builds
    • 2010 Group Builds
    • 2011 Group Builds
    • 2012 Group Builds
    • 2013 Group Builds

Categories

  • New Features
  • Other

Found 26 results

  1. Hello everyone. While my Mosquito getting final coats of satin varnish, I couldn't resist and started this one... Polikarpov I-16 Type 28 in 1:48 from Ukrainian manufacturer ICM: For those who unfamiliar with the kit here are few shots of sprues and details which are really nice and crisp: I started with the wings and ailerons: Followed by the cockpit which is really basic: The fit is brilliant and I really enjoyed that first hour with this model:
  2. A usually reliable russian source announces ICM is to release in 2017 a 1/32nd Polikarpov I-16 kit. To be followed. Source: http://scalemodels.ru/news/10678-anons-ICM-1-48-He-111H3.html For the record a 1/48th I-16 type 24 kit is expected by ICM in December 2016 (http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234994949-148-polikarpov-i-16-type-24-by-icm-release-q4-2016/#comment-2220104). V.P.
  3. I-16 Type 24. 1:32

    I-16 Type 24 ICM 1:32 Design work on the I-16 began during the summer of 1932 at the Central Aero and Hydrodynamic Institute. At this juncture Polikarpov was in the kind of straits that could only happen in the Soviet Union. His career which had entailed a swift ascent to the top post of the OSS (the department for experimental land plane construction), had taken a sudden downward plunge upon the occasion of his arrest during the 1929 purge. Instead of a firing squad or a gulag, however, Polikarpov and his design team were sentenced to an "internal prison," there to continue their work under the close supervision and scrutiny of the state. Evidently, his prosecutors judged him too vital to the future of Soviet military prowess to inflict the usual penalties of summary execution or slow death in a labour camp. When the tiny I-16 flew for the first time in December 1933, it was far ahead of any other fighter design in the world, featuring retractable landing gear, a cantilever wing and variable pitch propeller. Although not among the best remembered aircraft of the thirties, it was nevertheless a very able and rugged machine and featured prominently in the events of the time. When the Spanish Civil War broke out, almost 500 were put into service with the Republicans. The outstanding manoeuvrability, firepower and rate of climb, surprised the enemy leading to the opposition nickname of Rata (Rat) and the friendly name Mosca (Fly). Equipped with the Soviet 20 mm cannon it was the most powerful aircraft weapon in front line service with any nation on the eve of World War II. It had a very high rate of fire and was extremely reliable. Another batch of I-16s was purchased by China to fight the Japanese, again surprising the other side with excellent performance. When it first appeared, the I-16 Ishak (Little Donkey) was powered by a radial engine which developed a modest 450 hp. Even with this it achieved a creditable 376 km/h (234 mph) and, as the world's first single-seat fighter to have low monoplane wings, an enclosed cockpit (on some versions) and a retractable undercarriage. It was immediately put into mass production alongside the Polikarpov I-15 biplane fighter. Development led eventually to one version of the I-16 reaching over 520km/h (325 mph), with an engine of about two-and-a-half times the original power. At this point the I-16 might well have faded into obscurity, if not for the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War in July 1936. This war drew support from all over the world. The Nationalists, supported mainly by German and Italian forces, were the better equipped. Britain, France, the United States, the Netherlands, Czechoslovakia and Turkey all sent an assortment of aircraft to the Republican forces, directly or indirectly. But by far the major supporter of the Republicans was the Soviet Union, which supplied 1,409 of the 1947 aircraft contributed by other countries. 475 of these aircraft were Polikarpov I-16s. They first entered combat in Spain in November 1936. Flown in many cases by Soviet pilots, they proved more than a match for German He 51 fighters and Arado Ar68, but met their equals in the Italian C.R.32 biplanes and were overpowered by Messerschmitt Bf 109s. From March 1937, all remaining I-16s were concentrated into Fighter Group 31, and this was by far the most successful of all Soviet-equipped units. Meanwhile, I-16s were fighting also in China, and in 1939 were operated against the Japanese in Mongolia. Their final fling came during the early part of the Second World War, but by then they were overshadowed by more advanced foreign types. Suffering the brunt of the German invasion, those remaining were replaced by more modern fighters in 1942-1943. The Type 24 entered service in 1939 with the M-62 radial engine, but later versions had a 1,100 hp (820 kw) M-63 radial engine. The wings were strengthened and larger capacity drop tanks could be used. Most aircraft were equipped with either the RSI-1 or RSI-3 radio and oxygen equipment. The Model This is the first 1:32 scale kit from ICM, and having seen what’s in the box, I really hope it’s not their last. Once you take the lid off the box and opened the inner lid, you will find three large sprues of grey styrene, one small clear sprue and a medium sized decal sheet. All the parts are superbly moulded, with no sign of flash or other imperfections and only a few noticeable moulding pips. There are a few swirl marks in the plastic, but nothing to worry about and will easily be covered when the kit is primed and painted. Since the aircraft was mostly wood there are very few panel lines, where fabric was used in the construction, the kit shows the underlying structure, but in a nicely restrained way. Construction begins with the wings and the two upper sections being attached to the single piece lower section, after which the port and starboard clear navigation lights are attached. Each aileron is moulded in top and bottom halves, which, once joined together are fitted in the desired poses, along with the lower underside of the nose. The cockpit is assembled next, and is a very nicely detailed area. The rear bulkhead is fitted with the seat backrest and support, while the two piece rudder pedals are assembled. The pedals are fitted to the cockpit floor, along with the rear mounted battery box. The front and rear bulkheads are then glued into the left hand fuselage section along with some sidewall detail. The floor is then slide in through the front bulkhead opening and glued to the rear bulkhead. The two piece throttle is assembled and glued into position, and then the instrument panel, which is moulded in clear plastic is fitted with the instrument decal. The rest of the cockpit is then detailed with the oxygen bottle instrument panel, joystick, a couple of handles, and seat. On the opposite side wall the undercarriage handle and a couple of instrument clusters are attached. The firewall is fitted with the two piece oil tank and two gun troughs, before being fitted to one half of the fuselage. The two piece rudder and three piece elevators are then assembled, as is the two piece upper nose section. The fuselage halves are then joined, and the rudder, horizontal tailplanes and upper nose section attached, as are the two door panels. The fuselage and wing assembly are then glued together. The engine bearers and attached to the engine mounting ring, followed by gearbox case and intake manifold, the two halves that make up the cylinders, each with exquisite fin detail, are joined together, then fitted with the piston rods and individual exhaust pipes, before the gearbox assembly is fitted to the rear. The completed engine is then attached to the fuselage. The engine is cowled with three optionally fitted panels, plus the three piece nose cowl, with optionally positioned vents. The two machine guns fitted to the upper nose are then slid into their associated troughs, followed by the gunsight and windscreen. The build is finished off with the assembly of the two main undercarriage units. Each unit is made up of a two piece wheel, single piece main leg, complete with actuator, two outer doors, with separate hinged lower section, there is a second support rod fitted with another door which is glued to the leg and rear mounting point in the wing. The tail wheel is then attached, as is the tail cone and rear light, wing gun muzzles, side mounted venturi style pitot and what looks like an aerial unit, aft of the cockpit. Decals The decal sheet is printed by ICM themselves. The decals are quite glossy, well printed, in register and nicely opaque, particularly useful for the large white numbers and slogans. There are for decal options, three in standard green of blue camouflage and one in overall aluminium. The four aircraft are:- I-16 Type 24 of the 67th Fighter Regiment, South Front, Summer 1941 I-16 Type 24 of the 72nd Mixed Regiment of the Northern Fleet Aviation, Summer 1941 I-16 Type 24 of 4th Guard Fighter Regiment of the Baltic Fleet Aviation, Winter-Spring 1942 I-16 Type 24 of the 254th Fighter Regiment, Leningrad Front, Summer 1943. Conclusion There’s something about the old I-16, no matter which type. Whether it’s the cute little plane, or the plucky little fighter going up against the odds, with only the skills of the Soviet pilots keeping the aircraft, which was quite difficult to fly and fight with, in the air. This first large scale kit from ICM is really very nice and will build up into a great looking model with plenty of provision for the super detailers amongst us to really go to town on the interior. Review sample courtesy of
  4. Hello people , This is my first WIP. I have really enjoyed reading and watching the WIP's of others and feel it is time to try to give something back. I have a variety of interests in terms of modelling, but I always seem to come back to aircraft and AFV's of the Spanish Civil War. The variety of aircraft used is quite incredible and moreover, many were simply 1930's 'Golden Age' civil aircraft impressed into often quite bizarre roles; for example passenger Vultee aircraft and Fokker FVII/3M's becoming bombers. Nevertheless this was a proving ground or test run for many new technologies. In terms of aircraft the I-16 'Mosca', (the subject of this build) and the very first Bf-109 'V' prototypes then A (or is it B1?) through to E series, saw their baptism of fire here. The history of the conflict is well documented on the internet and in good old traditional books, and there are some simply splendid (albeit sometimes a little rare and expensive) books available on the aircraft involved in the conflict. Controversy about colours and actual aircraft involved is absolutely rampant and in a way, quite liberating. Within the community of Spanish Civil War modelling enthusiasts I know (not many!) a great deal of encouragement and artistic licence is granted. There is so little that can be certain, from actual numbers/codes of aircraft involved (BF-109C for example) to types (was there really an RWD-8 and a Bloch MB-200?) to, well, just about everything down to the colour of a particular Republican pilot's socks, or the strength and lens thickness of a particular Legion Condor pilot's monocle . OK. About me. I'm currently not very good at making models. In fact I'm certain that I'm not as good as I was when I was 9 years old and high as a kite on polystyrene cement most of the week, making at least 2 models a week, with very high standards for a little boy. But it was fun wasn't it? My grandfather had been a career RN man (Russian Convoys and MTO in WWII) and encouraged me into modelling. My introduction to modelling is described on the intro post I made some months ago to BM and a little more in my 'about me' so I won't ramble on about my early abject failures. Needless to say I returned to models after a bereavement in 2003 and it really helped me, like a breath of fresh air. Then work and an illness prevented me from starting again until last year. I thoroughly enjoy it, but I keep on trashing my efforts. Perhaps time to lower my standards? I think it would be far better to use this opportunity to probably demonstrate to the world at large that I am still highly capable of an abject failure.... Thus, onto this model. Amodel. What a fascinating company. That's one adjective. Others can be used. Nearly all of their kits pose a challenge in one way or another, they are short run, yet often they are short run for so long that the very sprue runs, and we end up with nothing but flash from which to try to identify and carve our own components . Nevertheless, they kit some wonderfully obscure subjects, and I love the wonderfully obscure! Thus - I feel I help keep someone, possibly in a cold dark cellar in Murmansk, with a scriber, some faded plans, some resin and a bottle of vodka, in a job. Some of their kits go together beautifully straight from the sprue, but there are some, like this little, tubby, I-16 that can be exceedingly variable in terms of moulding quality. In this case, from production batch to production batch. Ask me how I know. I decided to post this as my first WIP because, frankly, this model can be a real pain in the derriere. I know it isn't just me; it is known for possibly needing a bucket of filler. Moreover it has some issues, probably the main one is the wings. They aren't really of the right kind for an I-16 type 5 of the SCW (as I will refer to that very 'uncivil' war from now on). Other issues I will discuss as we progress together into the build. I have not completed a model since I started again around a year ago. To be honest they have all been rubbish and have flown directly into the dustbin. Often. Around 10 now. I have tried to build this one 4 times now. Dustbin; 3 times out of 4. The 4th attempt is in the drawer of doom. This will be attempt number 5. I am posting this, perhaps foolishly, because I had a Really Big Think™. I may, just may, have figured out a way to make this without the usually required bucket of filler. I'm sure I'm not the first, but I may perhaps be the most incompetent, so it should surely provide a little entertainment. I hope so anyway. I'm not awfully sure I have this Photobucket thing worked out yet, so I will only try to post a picture of the box here. I hope it works. I hope this WIP at least helps fellow modellers to see the fun a cheap little East European kit can give, even when it is utterly frustrating and maybe, together, we can find a way to tame this little beastie ?. Best regards, thanks for reading and happy modelling Tony Edited for terrible spelling.
  5. I-16 ICM 1/72

    Hello everybody! The old ICM kit (repack by MSD). The main problem of the kit, it's the absolutely wrong canopy form. So the canopy and some of the other elements were made by hand. List of the handmade parts: - gun barrells and pito tube were turned of steel; - exhaust tubes were turned as well of copper wire and then painted by lifecolor acrylic; - restraining strap on the bonnet was turned from aluminium rod as a thin ring. Yes I know, to cut out from aliminium foil is more simple way, but so it's looks better. There is no historical prototype for camouflage scheme. Thanks for looking, any comments are welcome.
  6. Hi everyone!) Its ones of my series "one-week build" from the ukrainian manufacter. Seat belts - PE-parts for unknown manufacter. Painting - Vajjeio Metal Color Aluminium, decals - Begemot ("silver 6"). Weathering - Tamiya. Thanks for your attention. Konstantin.
  7. ICM is to release in Q4 2016 a new tool 1/48th Polikarpov I-16 Type 24 kit - ref. 48097 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48097 Box art V.P.
  8. Riich Models is to release a 1/32nd Polikarpov I-16 Type 10 kit - ref. RA32001 Source: http://www.moxingfans.com/new/news/2017/0324/3454.html V.P.
  9. Polikarpov I-16 Type 24 - 1:48 ICM

    Polikarpov I-16 Type 24 1:48 ICM The I-16 was a Soviet fighter of revolutionary design. It was the worlds first low wing cantilever monoplane fighter with retractable landing gear to achieve operational status. The designer Nikolai Nikoleavich Polikarpov designed the aircraft optimised for speed with a short stubby fuselage similar to the Gee Bee racer. It was to feature cutting edge items such as a fully retractable landing gear and an enclosed cockpit. Work began in June 1933 and full scale production began in November of the same year. The aircraft was designed around the Wright Cyclone SR-1820-F-3 nine cylinder engine. The construction was a mix of wooden monocoque and wings based around chrome-molybdenum steel alloy wing spar. Original armament was a par of 7.62mm machine guns mounted outboard of the main wheels. The Type 24 aircraft featured Four machine guns, two in the original wing positions and two synchronised in the fuselage. Landing flaps replaced the original drooping ailerons, a tail wheel was also added. This variant was powered by a Shvetsov M-63 engine developing 900hp. At the start of WWII Russian had 1635 I-16 variants. During the first 48 hours of Operation Barbarossa Luftwaffe attacks on I-16 bases reduced this to only 937 aircraft. The I-16 was surprisingly good in combat against the Bf 109E with Russian pilots using its superior horizontal manoeuvrability. However later versions of the 109 would prove to be much faster, and more heavily armed. One advantage in the Russian winter was the I-16 had an aircooled engine and were more reliable. In all over half of the produced aircraft were still in service when they were replaced in 1943. The I-16 would also serve overseas with China. Germany, Romania and Finland would operate captured examples. The Spanish Republican Air Force used I-16s supplied by Russia, and after the Civil war these would be used by Spanish State Air Force, amazingly only being retired in 1952. The Kit This new tool kit arrives on two sprues with one small clear sprue containing the front windscreen, in a robust box with a lid under the outer cover. The parts are all very well moulded with nice engraved detail. There is no evidence of flash anywhere on the parts. Construction starts surprisingly enough not in the cockpit but with the wings! The bottom wing is one piece with upper left & right parts being added. The ailerons can then be added to each side. Now construction moves to the cockpit and interior. The rear cockpit bulkhead is attached and is placed inside the left fuselage half along with the front bulkhead. The cockpit floor has the seat base and rudder pedals attached and is slid into the bulkheads. The instrument panel is built up and fitted along with the pilots control column. Other controls and the lower part of the seat are then added. The engine bulkhead is then attached and the main fuselage can be closed up. The front decking with gun troughs is then added in front of the cockpit, and the rudder is now added along with the cockpit side doors. The main fuselage is now mated to the wings. The tailplanes are also added. Construction now moves to the front of the aircraft with the engine being built up. The main bearer has the engine mounting ring attached which is followed by the gear box and intake manifold. The cylinder bank is now added along with the front push rods and exhaust pipes. The engine is then fitted. The propeller then has its boss fitted and is attached to front engine cover through the vents which control cooling air to the engine. This assembly can then be fitted to the front of the fuselage along with ths side and top engine covers (these can be left open if required). The main landing gear struts and doors can now be attached along with the tail wheel . Finally the main wheels are attached. Decals A medium sized decal sheet printed by ICM is supplied with the kit. The decals are in register and appear colour dense. These aircraft did not carry many markings and this is reflected in the kit. There are enough national markings for all 4 decal options provided; 13th Sqn Baltic Fleet Aviaion, Summer 1940. 16th Fighter Regiment, South Front, Summer 1941. 72nd Mixed Regiment Northern Fleet Aviation, Summer 1941. 4th Guard Fighter Regiment, Baltic Fleet Aviation, Winter-Spring 1942. Conclusion There is no doubt this will build up to make a good looking model. I for one am a fan of this stubby looking aircraft. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  10. Hello fellow modellers, I hope you are having a pleasant weekend. I am building a 1/72nd scale Amodel Polikarpov I-16 Type 5. Unfortunately something strange happened to the canopy. It is no longer clear, it has gone a milky white and is now opaque. I live in Queensland Australia and had stored it in a little parts tin. I feel maybe humidity or some other factor related to heat caused this change, as it hasn't happened to canopies stored in normal kit boxes or zip-lock bags. It has probably been cooked! I have tried emailing Amodel and they cannot provide a canopy, only complete kits. I then found out that Falcon list an I-16 canopy in their Russian canopy 1/72 set. Unfortunately it isn't listed as an individual item in the Squadron range, so I would have to buy the complete Falcon set. It would be better value for money to buy this set than another I-16 kit, but I can't find any pictures of the Falcon set and wondered if the canopy included is the correct early type I need? It needs to be quite 'tent' shaped and fully enclosed. Does anyone know what type is in the set? Finally, I am hoping to model a Spanish Civil War Example (I know the kit has probably the wrong type of wings. I can live with this - this time ). I did wonder if anyone knows of a picture showing a SCW Polikarpov Type 5 (6?) with the later, open, round windshield rather than canopy? So far I have only seen this on type 10's, but if any type 5's like this existed my problem is solved. I have a good non-fogged one as I left it in the kit box rather than in the 'cooking' tin! I wonder why it became so fogged in that little tin, was it really that warm in there? Thank you for reading All best regards Tony
  11. I've recently read the Osprey Aircraft of the Aces book on Republic of China Air Force aces, and want to build some of the Polikarpov I-16s they flew. However they were supplied with Type 10s, though no 1/72 kits of this form exist. I have the Amodel Type 5 kit; starting from this, would the only changes involve the windscreen and adding guns to the fuselage? Thanks in advance for your replies.
  12. Hi. Just finished my Polikarpov this morning so obviously, thought i’d share. Straight out of the box in the colours of Borsi Safonov. Finished with some olive green i had left over over from my Hunter and some UK Azure for the bottom. Lost the wee thingy on the side unfortunately but apart from the small spaz i had over losing that, has been most enjoyable. So enjoyable that I’m going to attempt it 1/32 next. Hope you enjoy the pictures. Cheers (Temporary pics due to Photobucket) Thanks for looking! Simon
  13. I was lucky enough to score one of the Hasegawa I-16 Combo sets for quite a reasonable price; it's this one: Here's what you get inside (well, you get two of each of these): From the quick squint I had at it, it looks quite a nice kit, if a bit basic, the fabric effect on the wings and tailplanes looks excessively saggy in my opinion but it may actually have looked like that for all I know - in any case I will be building these OOB with the possible exception of the transfers - which I might use as they do actually look rather nice: I'll also have to read up on the paint colours here as I believe a lot of research has been done since I last built a VVS aircraft... I'm off work until Thursday so hopefully I can make a start on these today... *rubs hands together* Cheers, Stew
  14. Hi all, I finally gathered the courage and decided I'd join the group build. Common sense prevailed and I stuck with a project that would not take up too much space. Namely, I'm going to clean my stash of all remaining Hobbycraft I-16s. I made a few of these in my youth, unfortunately they were dumped in the bin by Mother dear after I left home . Only one survives and that's because it was being refurbished. Unnecessary bits from the Eduard and Ark kits ought to simplify things and improve accuracy. Unfortunately it seems I'm already off to a rocky start and today's work will be mostly undoing the damage I've done yesterday. The first specimen is meant to be a Type 5 and has had some work done on it, well below the 25% threshold I'd say: (In the background you can see the lone survivor, but it will not enter this GB). Reinforcements from the rear: the Eduard type 29 does not need these. I still need to raid the Ark kit for any piece it can shed. Now for my own embarrassment:undersurfaces from the other kit which I mean to build as a rocket-armed Type 24. I must have been modelling DUI because I thought at first that I could move the entire exhaust area to its correct location and only later I saw the folly of my actions. So I blanked the existing exhaustes and drilled holes in the new wrong position! I have plugged the holes with stretched sprue, now I'm left with the reinforcement and rescribing of the port side. In short I made a dog's meal of the piece. I'd like to say things can only improve from here, but I know myself...
  15. Academy has just re-boxed as limited edition the Hobbycraft 1/48th Polikarpov I-16 Type 24 kit - ref. 12314 Source: http://www.academy.co.kr/6q/board_news_main.asp?pMenuId=BOARD00012&pCode=9486 V.P.
  16. Azur kit with my own modifications.
  17. Ark Models is to rebox in 2015 it's 1/48th Polikarpov I-16 (http://www.ark-models.org/catalog.php?cid=10)with resin parts and or PE parts and turned metal parts. Source: http://www.ark-models.org/news.php - ref.AK48003 - Polikarpov I-16 Russian fighter. The kit includes resin parts. The kit for an assembly of two models of the Polikarpov I-16 fighter on a scale of 1:48 includes plastic parts and resin parts (a cockpit interior, a tail, figures of an aviatrix and a technician). ref.AK48006 - Polikarpov I-16 Russian fighter. The kit includes PE parts and turned metal parts. The kit for an assembly of two models of the Polikarpov I-16 fighter on a scale of 1:48 includes plastic parts, photo-etched parts and turned metal parts (RS-82 rockets, a Pitot tube, ShKAS machine gun barrels and ShVAK cannon barrels). V.P.
  18. Polikarpov I-16 Type 24 1:48 Eduard - Profipack The I-16 was a Soviet fighter of revolutionary design. It was the worlds first low wing cantilever monoplane fighter with retractable landing gear to achieve operational status. The designer Nikolai Nikoleavich Polikarpov designed the aircraft optimised for speed with a short stubby fuselage similar to the Gee Bee racer. It was to feature cutting edge items such as a fully retractable landing gear and an enclosed cockpit. Work began in June 1933 and full scale production began in November of the same year. The aircraft was designed around the Wright Cyclone SR-1820-F-3 nine cylinder engine. The construction was a mix of wooden monocoque and wings based around chrome-molybdenum steel alloy wing spar. Original armament was a par of 7.62mm machine guns mounted outboard of the main wheels. The Type 24 aircraft featured Four machine guns, two in the original wing positions and two synchronised in the fuselage. Landing flaps replaced the original drooping ailerons, a tail wheel was also added. This variant was powered by a Shvetsov M-63 engine developing 900hp. At the start of WWII Russian had 1635 I-16 variants. During the first 48 hours of Operation Barbarossa Luftwaffe attacks on I-16 bases reduced this to only 937 aircraft. The I-16 was surprisingly good in combat against the Bf 109E with Russian pilots using its superior horizontal manoeuvrability. However later versions of the 109 would prove to be much faster, and more heavily armed. One advantage in the Russian winter was the I-16 had an aircooled engine and were more reliable. In all over half of the produced aircraft were still in service when they were replaced in 1943. I-16 would also serve overseas with China. Germany, Romania and Finland would operate captured examples. The Spanish Republican Air Force used I-16s supplied by Russia, and after the Civil war these would be used by Spanish State Air Force, amazingly only being retired in 1952. The Kit The kit arrives on four sprues with one small clear sprue containing the front windscreen. The parts are all very well moulded with nice engraved detail. There is no evidence of flash anywhere on the parts. Construction starts with the cockpit and the interior of the fuselage. A mixture of plastic and photo-etch parts make up the cockpit details. Some of the engine exhausts are added at this time along with internal features. The fuselage is closed up and the cockpit is added from underneath. The cockpit is fairly Spartan much like the real thing. The instrument panel comes as either photo-etch parts, or as a decal; though you could paint the plastic panel if you prefer. A set of seatbelts is supplied on the photo-etch fret. Once the cockpit and instrument panel are in the wings are constructed. These are of a conventional one part lower wing, with left and right uppers. Once completed they are added to the fuselage. There are a couple of photo-etch parts to be added to the main wheel wells at this point. Next job is to install the tailplanes, rudder and tail wheel. Once this is done construction moves to the front of the aircraft. The engine face is added along with the cowl. Additional exhausts are added, along with the machine gun blisters on top of the front fuselage. Again in this area the modeller has a choice of plastic or photo-etch parts. The next step is to complete the landing gear, this is fairly complex with quite a few parts.. Luckily the instructions show a couple of different views so you can get the positioning of all of these parts correct. Some of the decal options in this kit had the gear doors removed from the aircraft so the modeller needs to check before adding the doors. Finally the gun sight, windscreen and prop added to finish off your model. A reflector gunsight along with a photo-etch ring sight are supplied. There are no instructions as to which to use, so the modeller will need to consult their references. Photo-Etch A small photo-etch fret is supplied with this profipack edition. This contains cockpit parts, instrument panels, seatbelts, pilot access door, and engine face. These are of typical Eduard quality with the instrument panel being pre-printed. Decals A medium sized decal sheet printed by Eduard is supplied with the Profipack. The decals are in register and appear colour dense. These aircraft did not carry many markings and this is reflected in the kit. There are enough national markings for all 4 decal options provided; Boris F.Safonov, 72 SAP Northern Fleet, 1942 (With a choice of patriotic slogans). Genadij Tsokolajev, 4 GIAP, Baltic Fleet, Lake Ladoga 1942. Lt Krichevskly, 254 IAP, Leningrad Front 1942 Lev L.Shestakov, 69 IAP, Odessa 1941. Conclusion There is no doubt this will build up to make a good looking model. I for one am a fan of this stubby looking aircraft. With the Profipack edition you get a few more extras in the box such as the photo-etch parts, some masks; and many more decal options. I-16 Profipack If the modeller wishes to use more of the decal options available in the profipack kit then there is a boxing of overtrees available from Eduard with all the plastic but no other frills. I-16 Basic overtrees (8149X) Review samples courtesy of
  19. Polikarpov I-16 - 1:48 ARK models

    Polikarpov I-16 1:48 ARK models The I-16 was a Soviet fighter of revolutionary design. It was the worlds first low wing cantilever monoplane fighter with retractable landing gear to achieve operational status. The designer Nikolai Nikoleavich Polikarpov designed the aircraft optimised for speed with a short stubby fuselage similar to the Gee Bee racer. It was to feature cutting edge items such as a fully retractable landing gear and an enclosed cockpit. Work began in June 1933 and full scale production began in November of the same year. The aircraft was designed around the Wright Cyclone SR-1820-F-3 nine cylinder engine. The construction was a mix of wooden monocoque and wings based around chrome-molybdenum steel alloy wing spar. Original armament was a par of 7.62mm machine guns mounted outboard of the main wheels. At the start of WWII Russian had 1635 I-16 variants. During the first 48 hours of Operation Barbarossa Luftwaffe attacks on I-16 bases reduced this to only 937 aircraft. The I-16 was surprisingly good in combat against the Bf 109E with Russian pilots using its superior horizontal manoeuvrability. However later versions of the 109 would prove to be much faster, and more heavily armed. One advantage in the Russian winter was the I-16 had an air-cooled engine and were more reliable. In all over half of the produced aircraft were still in service when they were replaced in 1943. The I-16 would also serve overseas with China. Germany, Romania and Finland would operate captured examples. The Spanish Republican Air Force used I-16s supplied by Russia, and after the Civil war these would be used by Spanish State Air Force, amazingly only being retired in 1952. The Kit Ark seem to have taken over from Frog in Russia, as well as models under the Ark name (some of which are old Frog kits), they also represent Eastern Express and MSD. it also looks like they are now producing their own kits. From looking at Ark's website they currently have 8 different boxing's of the I-16 with different types, and markings. Markings range from Russian aircraft, Nationalist Chinese markings, through to those used in the Spanish Civil War. The ones they have sent us are 48001 a Type 10 flown by Russian Ace Valey Chkalov, and a type 18 flown by Russian Ace Vasiliy Golubev. The sprues seem to be identical for both kits, though there will be parts not used. The kits arrive in very sturdy boxes with lids that slot closed. Instructions are A4 sized (which are a bot too big for the boxes, and the sprues are not bagged. The sprues are well moulded with a mixture of raised and engraved details. To be honest the real aircraft had few details and what there is seems to be well represented. In particular the fabric details do not seem overdone at all. There is no flash present, sprue gates are normal and ejection pin marks all seem to be on the reverse side of parts. Overall in the box the parts look good. There are two main sprues, two smaller sprues; and one very small clear sprue. Decals are minimal (the real aircraft did not carry much in the way of markings) and are printed by Begemot. Construction starts with the addition of the exhaust stubs to the inside of the fuselage halves. Once these are in the instrument panel can be placed inside and the fuselage haves joined. The top cowling of the engine area is then attached. The instructions have the modeller installing the gunsight at this point, though I suspect most will leave this until near the end. Next more exhaust stubs are attached to the underside engine cowling, and then this is attached. The tailplanes, rudder, and tailcone are then added. The next step is to assemble the main wings. The lower wing is a conventional one piece, to which the two top outer parts are attached. Machine gun barrels are added to the wings. The cockpit floor is then attached to the centre section of the lower wing. To this is added the control column, and the pilots seat.No rudder pedals are supplied. Once the wing section is complete this can be attached to the fuselage. Next the engine is assembled. A fair representation of a radial engine front is provided to sit behind the front cowl (not a lot will be seen in any case), as the moulds cover more than one kit he modeller will need to take care to select the right engine cowl. The propellor and hub are attached via a pin from behind. The last stage is the construct the landing gear. This is fairly basic with the harder part being the positioning of the door parts, the tail skid is also added. Lastly engine is attached, along with the canopy is added. Canopy From some research it appears the Type 10 was fitted with a canopy to replace the windscreen. Also the Type 19 was a re-engined Type 10 so I think these should come with a canopy as to the supplied windscreen. However a small windscreen is all we get. This is well formed and clear, however the frame lines are very indistinct. Decals Decals are provided for one aircraft per kit, they are printed by Begemot. I have used Begemot decals before with no problems. They do though appear to be of continous carrier film. 48001 - Valey Chkalov - This aircraft was overall Silver with red scalloped details. The small decal sheet just supplies the red start for all 6 locations, through the ones for the upper wing are silver outlines to go on top of the red. A set of printed masks is supplied to mask the red which is a great idea. These will need to be cut out but it is much better than trying to sort this making out for yourself. 48034 - Vasiliy Golubev - This aircraft was standard Green over light blue grey. Stars are provided for 6 positions along with code numbers and a badge for the right side. Conclusion This is the first kit I have seen from ARK and I am impressed. While the I-16 has been done in this scale before this kit is a good one. The kit seems to be an accurate representation of the I-16. It is not too complex so should appeal to the newer modeller, or the more experienced wanting an easier build. The aces boxing with the masks to produce the red scalloped markings is a nice touch. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of ARK models are currently seeking a UK distributor. If anyone wishes to look into this feel free to contact them, or get in touch with Britmodeller and we can make an introduction.
  20. New Kora Models (http://www.lfmodels.com/) is a 1/72nd VEF Irbitis I-16 resin kit. - ref. 72201 - VEF Irbitis I-16 Latvian Source: http://www.lfmodels.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=1885 Box art - ref. 72202 - VEF Irbitis I-16 German/Soviet Source: http://www.lfmodels.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=1886 Box art V.P.
  21. ICM is to release a new tool 1/48th Polikarpov I-16 type 24 kit in 2015 - ref.48097 Source - ICM 2015 catalogue : http://www.icm.com.ua/katalog/ Box art V.P.
  22. Polikarpov I-16 Type 24 1:48 Eduard - Weekend Edition The I-16 was a Soviet fighter of revolutionary design. It was the worlds first low wing cantilever monoplane fighter with retractable landing gear to achieve operational status. The designer Nikolai Nikoleavich Polikarpov designed the aircraft optimised for speed with a short stubby fuselage similar to the Gee Bee racer. It was to feature cutting edge items such as a fully retractable landing gear and an enclosed cockpit. Work began in June 1933 and full scale production began in November of the same year. The aircraft was designed around the Wright Cyclone SR-1820-F-3 nine cylinder engine. The construction was a mix of wooden monocoque and wings based around chrome-molybdenum steel alloy wing spar. Original armament was a par of 7.62mm machine guns mounted outboard of the main wheels. The Type 24 aircraft featured Four machine guns, two in the original wing positions and two synchronised in the fuselage. Landing flaps replaced the original drooping ailerons, a tail wheel was also added. This variant was powered by a Shvetsov M-63 engine developing 900hp. At the start of WWII Russian had 1635 I-16 variants. During the first 48 hours of Operation Barbarossa Luftwaffe attacks on I-16 bases reduced this to only 937 aircraft. The I-16 was surprisingly good in combat against the Bf 109E with Russian pilots using its superior horizontal manoeuvrability. However later versions of the 109 would prove to be much faster, and more heavily armed. One advantage in the Russian winter was the I-16 had an aircooled engine and were more reliable. In all over half of the produced aircraft were still in service when they were replaced in 1943. I-16 would also serve overseas with China. Germany, Romania and Finland would operate captured examples. The Spanish Republican Air Force used I-16s supplied by Russia, and after the Civil war these would be used by Spanish State Air Force, amazingly only being retired in 1952. The Kit The kit arrives on four sprues with one small clear sprue containing the front windscreen. The parts are all very well moulded with nice engraved detail. There is no evidence of flash anywhere on the parts. Construction starts with the cockpit and the interior of the fuselage. Some of the engine exhausts are added at this time along with internal features. The fuselage is closed up and the cockpit is added from underneath. The cockpit is fairly Spartan much like the real thing. No seatbelts are supplied, and the instrument panel comes as a decal, though you could paint the plastic panel if you prefer. I suspect the seatbelts and an instrument panel came as PE parts in the normal boxing of this kit. Once the cockpit and instrument panel are in the wings are constructed and added to the fuselage. Next job is to install the tailplanes, rudder and tail wheel. Once this is done construction moves to the front of the aircraft. The engine face is added along with the cowl. Additional exhausts are added, along with the machine gun blisters on top of the front fuselage. The next step is to complete the landing gear, this is fairly complex with quite a few parts, many of which are probably replaced with PE in other boxings. Luckily the instructions show a couple of different views so you can get the positioning of all of these parts correct. Finally the gun sight, windscreen and prop added to finish off your model. Decals This being the weekend edition there is only one set of decals provided. These are for I-16 Type 24 Pilot Boris F Safonov, 72nd SAP Northern Fleet, 1941. Conclusion There is no doubt this will build up to make a good looking model. I for one am a fan of the bare bones approach from Eduard, and also of this stubby looking aircraft. With the weekend editions you get the same excellent Eduard plastic without all the resin and/or photo etched parts I dont like. Overall highly recommended for those who like their modelling life a bit more on the simple side. Review sample courtesy of
  23. Source: http://scalemodels.ru/news/6298-Flagman-Models--samolety-v-1-32---jak-7di-i-16.html Flagman-Models (http://www.flagman-models.com/home.php) from Rostov in the Russian Federation is working on a 1/32nd Polikarpov I-16 kit. V.P.
  24. Hi all, This is my first real attempt at modelling for a while, half my life ago in fact. I posted an inbox review of this old kit on my youtube channel, when this thread and the 'Ishak' are finished, I shall post it on youtube as well. This was bought for me cheaply on Ebay a year and half ago by my wife, a great little find even though I have heard this particular kit slated for its inaccuracies but to me if it looks like a duck, sounds like a duck and tastess like a duck, it's a duck. It is made of hard(ish) plastic and has raised detail, also sadly there is no cockpit I will try to scratch build one and see how it goes.
  25. Started something totally new for me, a prop plane! First one a small kit, Eduard's I-16 Weekend edition in Spanish Republican marking of the Spanish civil war 1936-1939 as it is supposed to be build in a single weekend, construction was easy and straight forward, small and simple cockpit that will be nearly totally hidden in the fuslage, sorry no photos! ready for painting: hope you like it, I do a lot!, it is really small
×