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Found 247 results

  1. ZIS-151

    Hi everyone ZIS-151HobbybossScale 1/35It is made for the customer. Cheers Martin
  2. USS Pegasus PHM-1. 1:200

    USS Pegasus PHM-1 HobbyBoss 1:200 The Pegasus-class hydrofoils were a series of fast attack patrol boats employed by the U.S. Navy. They were in service from 1977 through 1993. These hydrofoils carried the designation "PHM" for "Patrol, Hydrofoil, Missile." The Pegasus class vessels were originally intended for NATO operations in the North Sea and Baltic Sea. Subsequently, participation by other NATO navies, including Germany and Italy, ceased and the U.S. Navy proceeded to procure six PHMs, which were highly successful in conducting coastal operations, such as anti-drug patrols and coastal patrol, in the Caribbean basin. The boats were armed with up to eight harpoon missiles, and an Oto Melara 76mm gun Whilst all the class were very similar, the Pegasus was actually built several years before the rest had was completed with a different fire control system, along with several other minor differences. All six vessels were constructed by Boeing, in Seattle at the Renton plant and were stationed at NAS Key West. The ships were retired because they were not judged cost effective for their mission in a Navy with primarily offensive missions rather than coastal patrol. USS Aries PHM-5 Hydrofoil Memorial, Inc. obtained Aries for rehabilitation as a memorial located on the Grand River in Brunswick, Missouri. All other PHMs in the class have been scrapped, except for Gemini, which was converted into a yacht and later scrapped. The Model Another kit that wasn’t expected, and certainly not in 1:200 scale. Having built the White Ensign Models 1:350 kit I had a feeling that this wasn’t going to be a large model, even in this scale, and I was right, with the overall length of just over 203mm and a width of just over 71mm. The dramatic boxart shows the boat at sea firing off a Harpoon missile. Inside there are six sprues, a single piece hull, single piece deck and two separate superstructure parts in grey styrene a sheet of etched brass and a small decal sheet. Despite its size, the mouldings are all really well produced. There is no sign of flash or other imperfections, although there are quite a few moulding pips, particularly on the small parts. As such, some care will need to be taken when parting from the runners and parts. Many of the structural parts for the Harpoon launchers and radar dome support are made entirely of PE, so you will need to be conversant with working with this medium and have a folding tool to hand. Construction begins with the assembly of the front foil, with the upright being glued to the foil itself. The assembly is then slipped into the slot in the bow, a shaft is then slid through the hull in the upright section and locked in place in the trunnions moulded within the hull. The single piece deck is then glued into place. Rear foils are made up from a single piece foil, and two, two piece uprights. The assembly is then clicked into place to the rear of the hull and you have the option of having them in the lowered or raised position by fitting the extended or retracted actuators. The bow foil doors are then glued into place with the foil either retracted or lowered. The two rudders are then attached, along with the two, two piece water jets. The bridge is then glued to the front of the superstructure, and is fitted with a set of seven wiper motors as well as PE wipers for each of the bridge screens. The superstructure is then fitted with PE intake screens, handrails, along with plastic parts such as life rings, life belts, bullhorn, and several other items that I cannot identify. On the top deck of the superstructure there are several stowage boxes, electrical boxes, and ventilators attached. There is also a liferaft, bridge access door and on the rear bulkhead a vertical ladder, access door and exhaust tube. Back to the top deck, five mushroom vents, a short whip aerial, another bullhorn, more storage boxes and two four piece, six barrelled decoy launchers are glued into their respective positions. The superstructure assembly is the glued to the main deck, and the eleven piece mainmast is assembled and glued into position. The four piece radar dome is attached to a three legged PE support structure, which will need some careful bending, before also being glued into position on the superstructure, along with a tall whip aerial, inclined ladder and klaxon. The foredeck is then fitted out with hatches, jackstaff, bitts, cleats, anchor and storage boxes. The turret mounting the 76mm gun is made up from six parts before being attached to the foredeck mounting plate. Two, three piece cable reels are then assembled and glued into position just in front of the bridge, one per side of the deck. The quarterdeck is similarly fitted out, with bitts, cleats, hatches, a cable reel, mushroom vents and ensign staff. The two PE Harpoon launcher frames are folded to shape and glued into position. The modeller has the choice of fitting any number of launch tubes to the frames, from one to four. On the port side of the quarterdeck there is a nine piece unit, which looks like a smoke generator of some sort. The last part fitted to the quarterdeck is the three piece funnel. Adding the PE ships railings all around the main deck and upper deck completes the build. Decals The small decal sheet provides the ships number for the bow, national markings for the aircraft and a pair of Jacks and Ensigns, in two different styles, and several small markings for the deck. They are well printed, in register and look to have pretty good opacity. Conclusion It’s great to this kit being released, as it’s quite a fun thing to have in the collection. Ok, it was one of those cul-de-sac designs, and not as important as some recent releases, but it is still interesting, nonetheless. It would have been nice to have alternative parts and decals for the rest of the class, but I guess we can’t have everything. From what I’ve been able to check in the relevant books the kits does appear to be pretty accurate too. Review sample courtesy of
  3. USS Guam CB-2. 1:350

    USS Guam CB-2 HobbyBoss 1:350 USS Guam was the second and last member of the Alaska class of heavy cruisers to be completed, although two more had been laid down, and supported the Fast Carrier Strike Force during the battle of Okinawa and raids on the Japanese Home Islands, before ending the war with raids into the East China Sea. She was awarded two battle stars for World War II service. The Guam was laid down on 2 February 1942, launched on 12 November 1943 and commissioned on 17 September 1944. Her shakedown cruise took her to Trinidad, and she left Philadelphia for the Pacific on 17 January 1945. She reached Pearl Harbor on 8 February, and joined the fleet at Ulithi at 3 March. She joined TF58, the fast carrier task force, with the role of providing anti-aircraft cover for the carriers. The fleet sortied on 4 March for an attack on the Japanese Home Islands. The fleet attacked targets on Kyushu on 18 March, and came under kamikaze attack. The Guam was unable to prevent the Japanese from hitting the carriers Enterprise and Intrepid from her task group. The carrier Franklin was more badly damaged, and the Guam formed part of a special task unit that was formed to escort her away from the danger zone and towards safety at Guam (operating alongside her sister ship Alaska). This duty lasted until 22 March and she then rejoined Task Group 58.4. The ship took part in a shore bombardment of Minami Daito on 27-28 March 1945, and then supported their carriers during operations off Okinawa until mid-May. In June she returned to Okinawa as part of TG 38.4 (command of the fleet having passed to Admiral Halsey, it had switched from being the Fifth Fleet to being the Third Fleet). Once again she supported the carriers during operations over Okinawa and the Jome Islands. She also carried out a second shore bombardment, this time hitting Okino Daito. She was then made flagship of Task Force 95 (Guam, Alaska, four light cruisers and nine destroyers). This fleet carried out a series of raids into the East China Sea and the Yellow Sea between 16 July and 7 August. The decline in Japanese power was demonstrated by almost total lack of resistance to these raids. With the end of the fighting the Guam joined her sister ship Alaska in a show of strength in the Yellow Sea, and the liberation of South Korea in September. In mid-November she left the Far East at the start of a 'Magic Carpet' mission, shipping US army troops back home. She reached Bayonne, New Jersey, on 17 December 1945, where she remained for the rest of her navy career. She was decommissioned on 17 February 1947, struck off in 1960 and sold for scrap in 1961. The Model Yet another maritime subject I never thought I’d see in my lifetime, although with the release of the Alaska last year it was only a matter of time for Trumpeter to release the Guam. But we are living in a golden age of modelling, and no subject can be written off. The ship is more of a battle cruiser with her 12” guns surpassing those of the Scharnhorst and Gneisenau which were designated battle cruisers. The kit comes in quite a large box, appropriate, since the hull is just over 700mm long. The artwork depicts the ship moored peacefully in a bay, possibly near one of the Japanese islands. Inside the box there are fourteen sprues, the single piece hull, two deck sections and four separate parts all in grey styrene, two small sprues of clear styrene, four quite large sheets of etched brass and a small decal sheet. The moulding is superb, particularly the hull, (I’d love to see the moulds this parts come out of), which has the smallest of detail on the lower bow, A number of sprues have been given extra protection with foam wrapping, as well as the standard poly bags in which the sprues are contained. There is no sign of flash, warping or other imperfections, with perhaps the exception of one bilge keel which looks slightly strained on its sprue gates. There are quite a few moulding pips though which will increase the time to clean up the parts. Despite its size, it doesn’t look a particularly difficult build, but you will need some experience with using PE as there are some parts that are made entirely of brass. Construction begins with drilling out of certain holes in the two deck sections, before attaching them to the hull. Turning the hull upside down the two bilge keels are attached, followed by the four propeller shafts, A frames, propellers and three piece rudder. With the hull right side up the decks are fitted out with the numerous bitts and cleats, ventilators, windlasses, four piece cable reels and three piece winches. The pair of three piece intake towers are then fitted amidships, whilst a three piece deckhouse is fitted aft, just forward of the stern 40mm gun tubs. There is a similar deck house fitted just aft of the anchor cables, for which there is a length of chain provided, followed by the two, three piece bow anchors, the main breakwater and a pair of 20mm gun tubs abaft the bridge. There are two, two piece catapult towers fitted amidships, while further aft there are more 20mm and 40mm gun tubs attached. Eight carley floats, stacked three high are then glued into position, followed by four AA director towers and their respective directors, while on the fo’c’sle another AA director tub is attached to a small deckhouse, which, in turn is glued between the hawse pipes, and the Jack staff glued in place. Eight sub-assemblies are then built up using a combination of plastic and PE, with the exception of the bow mounted 40mm tub, the rest are ventilators. There are twelve two piece 20mm Oerlikons fitted from bow to abaft the bridge, and there are three float baskets fitted just forward of the breakwater. Aft of the catapult towers, twenty more 20mm Oerlikons and twelve more float baskets are fitted. The bridge structure, which includes B barbette on the lowest level, which is fitted with two more decks and the base of the foremast, with separate ships bell, as well as four triple stacks of carley floats, and two PE boxes fitted one per side of deck 02. Deck 02 is also fitted with a pair of 40mm gun tubs and for ventilators, while deck 03 is fitted with deck 04, which in turn is fitted with the armoured bridge and a deckhouse, followed by deck 05. Two searchlight platforms, with searchlights are fitted, one per side of the lower foremast, while the myriad of observation and director sights are fitted around the decks and in additional cylindrical towers. All around the superstructure there are PE vertical ladders and some of the smaller railings to be added. On 02 deck the railing include the netting that goes around the two 400 mm tubs on that deck. More sub-assemblies are made up, again using PE and plastic, these being the main radar array, main battery controllers and secondary battery controller stations. The foremast is then assembled with several platforms separated by additional blocks and topped off with a large yardarm, more observation equipment, forward main battery rangefinder and radar array and the main radar platform main search radar array. This section of the tower is then fitted to the base fitted to the bridge earlier, along with a secondary battery controller. The funnel is made up from two halves, with additional parts fitted internally, (pipework and angled smoke plates), as well as externally, including searchlight platforms, klaxon horns, walkway, and railings for the different platforms. It is finished off with the attachment of a large PE mast fore and aft, the foreward one with a navigation radar array, and the aft with a large yardarm. The aft superstructure is made up of two decks and fitted out with more ventilator intakes, PE gas bottles, vertical ladders, deckhouses and two tall controller towers. It is also fitted with the small AA directors, and four 20mm Oerlikons. The funnel assembly is the glued to the foreward end of the superstructure, while a main battery rangefinder and radar assembly is fitted to the taller of the two towers, while the shorter one mounts a secondary battery director. The bridge assembly and aft superstructure assembly are then glued to their respective positions on the deck and the four PE inclined ladders are folded and glued into place. Near the aft end of the aft superstructure there are two deckhouses, each fitted with two 40mm gun tubs, each fitted with more PE gas bottles, vent intakes and support columns. Just forward of these is a separate deckhouse which will mount the ships cranes. Each quad 40mm Bofors mount is made from five parts, and there are fourteen of them to be assembled. Each one is then glued into one their gun tub. The two catapults the ship carried are made almost entirely of PE. Each catapult consists of eleven parts. When assembled they are fitted to their towers amidships. The two cranes are also mostly PE and consist of fourteen parts. These are fitted to their respective positions just aft of the catapults. The crane mounts and separate 40mm gun tubs are fitted with netting, rather than railings. The secondary armament consists of six twin 5” turrets. Each turret is made from ten parts, and once assembled fitted into their positions. The main turrets of three 12” guns are each made from eighteen plastic and twe3lve PE parts. Again, once assembled they are fitted into their respective mounts. Lastly the two Seahawk aircraft are assembled from seven clear parts and, once painted, glued to the catapults. The finishing touch is to add the ships main deck railings, and the build is complete. Just mount the model on the stand and add the name plate, which is also provided. Decals The small decal sheet provides the ships number for the bow, national markings for the aircraft and a pair of Jacks and Ensigns, in two different styles. They are well printed and look to have pretty good opacity. Conclusion I’ve always liked this class of ship and never thought I would see one released in my favourite scale, let alone both of them, with another, (although not actually built), on its way. But Hobbyboss have done it again and released something we never thought we’d see. From the limited resources I actually have, or more to the point, could find in my library, the kit looks to be pretty accurate, as with the Alaska though, I’m not sure about the bow, which does have a very odd step in the stem that I can’t see in any diagrams or pictures. If it is wrong then it is easily rectified with some filler. Other than that it really does look like another great kit. Review sample courtesy of
  4. Sd.Kfz. 222 Light Armoured Vehicle HobbyBoss 1:35 History Adoption of the SdKfz 221 series of armoured cars in 1935 by the German Army eventually led to a broadened line of similar cars all based on the same power pack, design form, and running gear of the original in the SdKfz 222 and SdKfz 223. The SdKfz 222 was an up-gunned form mounting a combination 20mm cannon with 7.92mm machine gun in its turret. The 222 also increased the crew by one to three so a dedicated gunner could manage the armament. All of the vehicles in the family were of the same 4-ton, light-class design though the 22-models proved slightly heavier in practice thanks to the additional armament and its applicable ammunition stores required. The 222-model retained the original's open turret as well as its folding mesh protector which was designed to keep enemy grenades from entering the fighting cabin in action. Production of the SdKfz 222 variant spanned from 1937 into 1943 to which some 990 of the type were eventually delivered. Early forms lacked radio sets up until early 1942 and the original MG13 machine guns were upgraded to the MG34 machine gun in 1938. Finally, during 1942, the original KwK30 cannon was upgraded to the KwK 38 series and a different chassis was used which led to the Ausf.B. The SdKfz 221, 222, and 223 cars succeeded over earlier German Army armoured cars because they were built atop a dedicated armoured car chassis designed with the rigors of military service in mind. This also improved cross-country travel which was an important quality of a modern mechanized force. All three variants held inherent 4x4 wheel drive and four-wheel steering capability and used the same Horch V8 gasoline engine which simplified in-the-field repair work and general logistics. The engines were installed in a rear compartment on all marks, leaving the central and frontal hull sections for the crew and armament. A spare road wheel was carried externally, on the right hull side in case of emergency. The addition of heavier armament added slightly more weight to the SdKfz 222 design which already was forced to manage the armoured superstructure. Sloped armour was seen on all faces of the hull superstructure which offered protection from small arms fire up to 7.92mm in calibre. The 222-model could engage other light-armoured vehicles through Armour-Piercing (AP) projectiles and enemy infantry concentrations through use of a High-Explosive (HE) 20mm shell. 180 x 20mm projectiles were carried aboard along with 1,050 x 7.92mm rounds of machine gun ammunition. However, it still remained a reconnaissance-minded and scouting vehicle first and not intended a direct-combat vehicle - its armament intended for local defence. Their compact dimensions did make them hard targets to train in on at range but protection for the crew was, on the whole, lacking against larger calibre weaponry. The Model This is yet another of the old Tristar moulds being put back into good use, and a good looking kit it is. The box art is the same as the Tristar packaging with the colour artists impression of a pair of vehicles on the road, surrounded by a yellow boarder. As with the other kits, all the parts are beautifully moulded, with the sprues in a sandy yellow styrene. There are seven sprues in the yellow styrene, one of clear styrene. There are also four rubber tyres, one sheet of etched brass, eight small springs and a smallish decal sheets. There is no sign of flash or other imperfections, but there are quite a few moulding pips that will need to be cleaned up. Looking at the parts count and layout, it doesn’t appear to be a complicated build, but the interior and suspension detailing means it would probably not be easy for a novice modeller. Construction begins with the chassis, the two rails being joined together by seven cross-members and the three piece rear differential. The four upper wishbones are then attached, one per corner, followed by the three piece front differential, drive shaft and attachment shaft. Two towing hooks are fitted to the front of the chassis, followed by the front bumper, two shock absorbers per axle, complete with actual metal springs and the lower wishbones. Each wheel is made up from five parts, plus the rubber tyre, these, and the nine piece steering rack are then fitted to the chassis and the whole assembly put to one side. The lower hull is fitted with the fighting compartment floor, followed by the build up of the interior details. These include the drivers pedals, steering column, battery box, five control sticks to the front, while to the rear there are two storage boxes and a seat frame. The engine compartment bulkhead si then fitted, as is the two piece drivers seat and six piece ammunition box and rack. The turret basket frame is then assembled and fitted with the commanders seat, rotation hand wheel and gearbox, plus turret control pedals. The 20mm cannon is made up from four parts. This is then attached to the nine piece gun mount along witht eh two piece MG-34 machine gun. Pipe work is then attached to eh mount, before the assembly is attached to the turret basket assembly, with the addition of the traversing gear and trunnion mounts. The interior is further detailed with the addition of various items such as binocular cases, pistol holster, stowage boxes, interior frames as well as the two, three piece side doors, external towing hooks to the rear, large storage box on the left hand side and spare wheel on the right hand side. The rear wheel arches are attached and fitted with more gear, such as the large jack, tool boxes, light clusters, tow cable, as well as the exhaust. The upper hull section is fitted with the vision ports which can be posed open if required. The engine hatches are glued into place, as are the headlights, lower glacis plate, pioneer tools and rear mounted extension box. The interior of the upper hull has more detail fitted in the shape of gas mask cases, steering wheel and instrument panel, which has decal instruments, vision port hinges, bolt croppers, and gun cleaning rod case. The upper and lower hulls are joined together and the four piece front wheel arches attached. These are fitted with hooded lights, corner extent poles, and wing mirrors. The gun mounts/turret basket is the pushed into place so that it can traverse before the six piece turret, plus three piece radio set and mounting, is assembled and pressed into place. The two turret hatches are fitted with their respective PE anti grenade screens before being glued to the turret in either the open of closed positions. The two piece aerial base is attached as is the PE decking to the rear of the turret. The completed hull assembly is then glued to the chassis assembly, completing the build. Decals The small decal sheet contains markings for three vehicles, they are nicely printed, in register and opaque. The three options are:- 1./Kradschuetzen-Btl., Gross Deutschland Panzer Grenadier Division, Orel, Russia, 1942 in overall Panzer Grey 20 Panzer Division, USSR, 1943, in overall Panzer Grey with Dark Yellow splotches Bulgarian Army, M222, First Army Armoured Battalion, Hungary, February, 1945, in overall Panzer Grey. Conclusion I was pleasantly surprised with this kit having a full interior, excellent news for those who like to have all the hatches open or for use in a diorama. It’s only small, but they have packed a lot into it, and it looks like it will build into a very nice little model. Review courtesy of
  5. IAR 80

    The IAR 80 was a small-series Romanian-built WW2 fighter plane. Built with very limited resources and under many unfortunate circumstances, the plane behaved pretty well during its operational life, on all fronts. This little forgotten fighter is really close to my heart so I was very happy to see that Hobbyboss decided to offer a plastic kit dedicated to IAR 80. Now let's see what's in the box: Dry-fitting of the main pieces is very good and also the kit seems to be pretty accurate in dimensions. It really looks like an IAR80:) But this is where the good news is over, because the kit has some errors probably caused by sloppy documentation work (no wonder for Hobbyboss). Hopefully, with some love & tenderness, most of these can be properly addressed. I also acquired the separate PE instrument panel released by Yahu Models for IAR 80. It can be seen in the above picture with the canopy and windscreen. Although it looks like difficult to assemble (it is not the traditional just-stick one-piece IP from Yahu, this set consists of many small pieces that must be assembled together), I strongly recommend it for those interested in IAR 80, because it is a HUGE improvement over the kit's parts. The kit itself comes with a small PE fret containing the seat belts...but unfortunately these seatbelts are not correct for the early time-frame of the IAR 80 series. This type of seatbelts were indeed fitted to IAR 80/81 but only starting with summer 1943. They were also usually retro-fitted to earlier models of the plane, but of course starting with 1943. A 1940-1941-1942-early 1943 machine would not be fitted with such seatbelts. As said, the IAR 80 was produced in very limited numbers, only some 450 machines were built and it was used operationally only by the Romanian Air Force, mostly on the Eastern front and home defense missions. As an example, when fighting the Americans during the Ploesti oil fiend missions, it was usually mistaken with the Fw190:) Anyway, there is very limited knowledge about this plane and a very good reference work on the subject is the book "Romanian Hunter" authored by Radu Brinzan. Very solid work, it contains lots of details needed for an IAR 80 model. I greatly recommend it to anyone interested. One of the main problems of the Hobbyboss kit is that the original decals are almost unusable and the painting instructions are largely incorrect. There are decals for 2 airframes in the box: aircraft no.42 and aircraft no.137. But no.137 was a 6-gun wing model, while in the box we have the 4-gun wing model. Of course, some modifications could be made, but the idea is that OOB the markings for no.137 are incorrect for this model. The remaining variant, no.42 airframe, was indeed a 4-guns wing, but the King Michael's crosses are not the right ones for this model. But again Radu Brinzan came to help with this lovely decal sheet dedicated to early series on IAR 80, which is offering some very nice and correct markings and painting instructions for the earliest IAR 80 airframes. Another problem is related to the guns. As represented in the kit, they are not very correct and anyway under-represented. The early IAR 80 series were armed with 4 FN machine guns. These were some Belgian variations of the classic Browning 303. I looked to find some decent aftermarket for these and I found appropriate only this Quickboost set designed for the new Airfix P40B kit, which contains 4 browning 303 barrels. While not perfect, they are the closest match I could find for the FN's installed in the early IAR 80. Anyway, I intend to represent an early IAR 80 airframe, one of the machines built in the first series. The airplane was built in small batches, first series spanning from No.1 to No.20. I will probably go for a pre-war marking (1940 to early 1941 time frame), so the most probable candidates are no.2, no.9 or no.17 from Radu's decal sheet. That's all for the moment . Thanks for looking and cheers,
  6. HobbyBoss 1/48 F-14D

    Hi all. For my second WIP thread I am doing the HobbyBoss F-14D 1/48. This is a kit I’ve wanted to build since watching Genissis models walkthrough on YouTube and his final reveal on this forum. I known i could ha r waited for the carriers ahoy or Grumman GB’s.... but I was very keen to crack on with this kit! This will be another OOB build and I am sticking pretty much with the walkthrough on YouTube until I get to the painting stage. Here’s where I am so far..... Cockpit built along with the radar and front landing gear bay. All assembled and sealed up never to be seen again! I have also covered up the Gatling gun system. This is going to need some filling and sanding sadly. Then I moved into the wings. As per Bob’s step by step I removed the front underside of the flap don i could have flaps and slats up and closed and sit flush. And I have also assembled and painted the engine inside. As they are going to be sealed in I am not doing any of the exterior work on them. And that is pretty much where I am at the moment. Just waiting for the paint to dry on the inside of the intakes then I can start to mask and attach to the lower rear fuselage. thanks for looking.
  7. HMS Agamemnon 1:350 Hobbyboss History HMS Agamemnon was the pride of the British Royal Navy and the last of her pre-dreadnought battleships produced. Because she was of a "bridge" design between the ironclad vessels of old and dreadnought ships to come, her design and her fate were already established before she was ever launched. Coming along just after the turn of the century, she survived long enough to see action in World War 1 (1914-1918) but very little beyond that. HMS Agamemnon was of a dying breed of ship, though a capable design she was, perhaps appearing two decades too late. Her profile was dominated by a center superstructure, twin masts and twin funnels. Her battery of four 12" main guns were housed in two armoured turrets - one fore and one aft, two guns to a turret. This was augmented by 10 x 9.2" guns positioned in turrets around the superstructure. Her other armament consisted of 24 x 12-pounder cannons and an additional 2 x 3-pounder types centered around a quick-fire action. To compliment this armament, 5 x torpedo tubes of 460mm were provided with 23 torpedoes to spare. Crew complement totalled over 800 personnel and power was derived from her vertical triple expansion 4-cylinder engines powered by no less than 15 x boilers. This turned twin screws at 16,750 horsepower and offered speeds close to 19 knots. Once launched, the vessel undertook some basic operations before being called up to active service in the First World War as part of the Channel Fleet in February of 1915, serving alongside HMS Lord Nelson - her sister ship. Her main guns were brought to bear on inland Ottoman targets in the same month and provided cover fire for amphibious operations soon after including the infamous Gallipoli landings in April. During this time, HMS Agamemnon survived several direct howitzer ships but none were critical to underlying systems and her crew losses were manageable. The Agamemnon survived the war and had Ottoman representatives present on her decks to sign the Armistice. Beyond that, the class had reached its pinnacle and HMS Agamemnon was relegated to the role of a target ship in the middle 1920's. Surviving that affair, she was broken down and sold for scrapping in 1927. The Model We’ve yet to see many British ships in this scale from WWI, but it’s great that we are at last seeing some pre-dreadnoughts being released, and long my it continue as there are some great subjects that I’m sure we’d all like to see on our work benches at some point in the future. This kit of HMS Agamemnon comes in a relatively small box, as these weren’t the largest of ships compared with later battleships. It’s just a shame that they got the spelling of the ships name wrong though, both on the box and the instruction sheet. Fortunately though, they got it right on the nameplate in the kit. Inside there are nine sprues, one separate part and the deck all produced in light grey styrene, four sheets of etched brass, a length of chain and a small decal sheet. Since they got the hull right on the HMS Lord Nelson kit, it’s only natural that they got it right with her sister ship, at least, according to R A Burt and his excellent books on British battleships and also the constructors model which used to be on display at the Science museum. The rest of the parts are very nicely moulded with plenty of detail, although there will be some who will want to add even more. There are no signs of flash or other imperfections, but there are quite a few moulding pips, which means a little extra cleaning up of parts. Construction begins with the two piece hull being joined together and strengthened with the three bulkheads and two end beams. The single piece deck is then attached, making a pretty solid and strong hull. On the underside, the tow propeller shafts, A frames and propellers are fitted, as is the single rudder. With the hull upright, the three piece, fully PE, Admirals walkway is fitted to the stern, followed by the PE rails fore of A turret barbette and aft of X turret barbette. The myriad of windlasses, cleats, bollard and ventilators are then glued into their respective positions, as are the Jack and Ensign staffs and their supports. Amidships there are seven deck houses to be fitted along with four cable reels and three winches. The superstructure is made up from a single piece item to which twelve supports are glued to the underside before being glued into position over the previously fitted deck houses. Remember to add the pair of foreward mounted 12 pounders that fire from ports at the forward end of the superstructure, as you won’t get them in once the deck is glued down. The superstructure longitudinal bulkheads are then attached, as are PE four inclined ladders, four side mounted windlasses, two boat booms and the anchor chains. To the upper deck, four, three piece winches, sixteen 12 pounder guns and five deck houses are fitted. This deck is then covered by a two piece 03 deck, with the aft section supported by six vertical columns. The main bridge deck is then attached foreward and small mezzanine decks aft with two inclined ladders leading to the 12 pounder deck. Each of the two funnels are made up from two halves, a base and funnel cap. To these, PE funnel cap grilles are added, along with PE hand and foot rails, and two auxiliary vents. The three piece armoured bridge, two deck houses and the two piece ships wheel are attached to the bridge deck. The two funnel assemblies are then glued into place along with two vertical columns aft. The boat deck is fitted out with eighteen PE boat cradles and a rescue float. There are fifteen boats in total, most of which come with separate hulls and decks, and some also have separate rudders. The three steam pinnaces and eight rowing boats are glued to their respective cradles, and then two other rowing boats are crutched within a larger boat. The main mast is made up from lower mast section, a two tier observation top with PE support brackets, upper mast section and yardarm. The lower section is then fitted with three PE blocks, and the three piece goose neck for the boat crane boom, which is also fitted with PR blocks and a PE hook. This is then fitted aft of the boat deck and supported by two angled support arms, finished off with two PE vertical ladders. The foremast is of similar construction, just with a slightly small boat handling boom, three yardarms and a searchlight in the lower of the two tier observation top, it is then glued just aft of the armoured bridge deck house. The PE bridge house surrounding the ships wheel is then folded to shape and glued into place, with another deck above it supported by two PE braces. Two binnacles are attached to this deck and inclined ladder. Six 12 pounder guns and eight searchlights are fitted around the boat deck and the PE bridge wings attached wither side of the bridge deck. The bridge deck and aft boat deck railings are then attached, as are the two long ladders to the foremast observation platforms, and two pairs of davits to the aft end of the superstructure. Four more two part ships boats are assembled and fitted to the two pairs for davits either side of the quarterdeck. The anchors, fourteen anti-torpedo net booms are then attached to the hull, along with the two PE rear mounted accommodation ladders and the PE folded netting that is fitted to each side to the ship. Each of the two main gun turrets and six secondary turrets are made in the same way with the barrels fitted with separate trunnions and trunnion mounts glued to the base with the turret slid over the barrels and glued into positions. Some of the turrets are fitted with 12 pounders and some with 3” gun on their roofs and all have PE vertical access ladders attached. Once assembled, they are fitted into their respective barbettes. Finally the main PE railing is attached to the main deck, completing the build. Well, I say completed, but if you want to do a proper job you will probably spend more time with the complex rigging than you had done for the whole build. Good luck with that. Decals The single decal sheet contains just a pair of White Ensigns and Admirals flags. They seem pretty well printed, with good opacity and in register. Conclusion With the releases of her sister ship, it was only natural that they release the Agamemnon, or “Egg and Bacon” as it was known in the service. It certainly is a lovely looking kit and not too taxing to build and paint. The rigging will, however, be a challenge, to say the least if you want to go the whole hog, but will look good with a representative amount should you blanche at the idea. Review sample courtesy of
  8. to my modeling circuit there are, in addition to ships and technology, I send some models from my modeling workshop.
  9. Hello all, Here is my recently completed 1/48 Hobbyboss Su-30MKK Flanker, marked as an MK2 of the Venezuelan Air Force. The build thread is here Extras used included Wolfpack Designs K-36 ejection seats, Caracal decals, Master pitot tube, Eduard Brassin OFAB-250 bombs and Quickboost intake covers (modified F-14 examples). Overall the Hobbyboss kit is decent, with some lovely details, but a few niggling points, but nothing major. With my Vietnamese and Indonesian examples (both Academy kits): Thanks for looking. Dave
  10. Hello maritime builders. I’ve been slowly getting back into this hobby this year and this is my very first attempt at maritime modelling so I know there’ll be plenty of mistakes, but I wanted to do it to learn new skills and techniques. As described in the ‘Work in progress’ thread, this Hobbyboss kit is really excellent for its size and cost and is a very quick build. The kit has been built OOTB with the only exception being the VLF aerials. These were added because they’re a prominent feature on the full size craft, although finding a suitable scale size medium proved a bit troublesome. In the end my darling partner came to the rescue and donated some of her very fine hair which happened to be near enough scale in thickness. The hair was fixed in place with medium CA glue and the insulators were simply blobs of thick CA. The hair was painted in German Grey and the insulators in Red Brown. I’m fairly happy with the end result and I had intended to place the sub on a ‘North Sea’ diorama, but chickened out as making dioramas is a whole new skill that I need to learn at a later date. Anyway, modelling at this scale with Mr. Magoo eyes and sausage fingers has tested my patience somewhat (especially the PE and aerial wires), but it’s certainly kept me entertained! BTW, as ever, constructive criticism is more than welcome and I must say a big thank you to Tobby on this forum as it was his U-boat presentation that inspired me to have a go.
  11. Merry christmas one and all! I was hoping to get this finished with its diorama base, but the post held up the snow.........or by the snow :-) But i have been working on this beastie (its huge compared to a spit or a 109!!) between studies for the last few months, its a great kit with a few fit issues around the wings area. I tried a few new techniques out on the kit as I wanted to explore a few more avenues to make my models look more realistic. I started by priming the kit and doing a black pre-shade and then doing the full camouflage out the topside of Russian green (Mr Hobby 135) and black (Tamiya XF-1) with the underside painted with light blue (Tamiya XF-23). Then I de-canned some hairspray and coated the craft with my spray gun to get a better coverage on the kit, over the top of this I sprayed white (Tamiya XF-2 with a drop of brown and blue so the white wasn't a brilliant white) and then weathered it by using a stiff brush and warm water to lift the paint (very scary moments). Then its was gloss coated and decals set followed by a matt coat and post shading, the post shading was my first attempt at it and I am very happy with the result. There maybe a few inaccuracies, so please be aware I model on a 'it looks good, so its good for me' basis. Forgive the photo's on a white background as I had nothing else to use, but I ended up using the Sturmovik's base that will be grassed and snowed....when it turns up, I will update photos when it does :-) All comments and criticism is welcome, as criticism is how we improve. Many thanks for looking. Thanks for looking
  12. Having been inspired by Tobby the Hun’s 1/350 U-Boat diorama I decided to have a go myself as I’ve always had a keen interest in Wolfpack subs. As the title suggests I’ve bought the Hobbyboss type IX (it cost less than a tenner!) and when it arrived on my building board I immediately realised that I should have bought a larger scale because a 1/350 sub is very small (less than 9” long!) for my ageing, arthritic, sausage fingers, but never mind, I like a challenge. Either that or I’m mad! The parts are extremely well detailed considering it’s diminutive size and I wonder why some of the larger AFV’s seem so crude by comparison. Cost I suppose? Anyway, I didn’t take any pictures of the sprues and PE as there really aren’t many parts to show so I’ve waited until the two main structures have been assembled and primed. The PE parts for the various hand rails were a real challenge to shape and adhere in place, but so far I think I’ve managed to do a half decent job. Next task is the basic colour scheme and marrying the conning tower to the sub. Small details like the guns, antennae and aerial wires will be assembled afterwards. To assist in handling during painting I’ve tack glued some scrap sprue to the two main parts as the PE is very fragile and vulnerable to being clobbered. BTW, this is my first sea going craft since I built the little Airfix Mayflower when I was a youngster back in the 60’s so it’s long overdue! To be continued.....
  13. Warhorse’s Fury

    Hello all .... As I said in my Scooter RFI I built this Hobbyboss FJ-4b Fury along side it. Its not a bad kit but i do think at least in some ways its a clone of the Grand phoenix Fury. I built the Grand phoenix fury as my 3rd model when I came back in 2014. I will add a few photos of it at the tail end of this RFI. I’m a bit of a nut with Sabres, Furies, and Super Sabres. I will let the plane do most of the talking. I chose to represent a Fury flown by VA-55 in 1958 off the USS Bennington. I had a spare decal set for the codes. But i hand painted the Checkerboards & made a mask for the Trident. Thanks to @Tailspin Turtle for his assistance in finding photo’s. So here is my VA-55 Fury. I chose to arm this with Two Aim-9b’s, two drop tanks, & two rocket pods. The Grand Phoenix Fury is from VMA-212 and has two Aim-9b’s, Two gas bags, & a data-link pod and a Bullpup missle. Ok the Grand Phoenix Fury is in the back, with the red markings. Yes i know the codes are reversed i didn't catch it right away when i built it. Well I hope they meet with your approval. As usual Comments, Questions, or Jokes ? Someday i hope to do a whif of both the FJ-5 fury proposal that was to compete with the A-7 and the Super Fury that was to compete with the F-8 Crusader. But this will be for another time. Dennis
  14. MAN LKW 5t MIL GL Truck Hobbyboss 1:35 In the 1960s the Bundeswher was looking to replace its fleet of vehicles which stemmed from the birth of the modern German Army. They wanted a fleet of 2, 3 & 4 axle vehicles in the 4 to 10 tonne payload range which had to be amphibious. As it was a large task it was suggested that bidding companies form a common development company for a unified project. This was set up under the leadership of MAN and included Klockner-Humboldt-Deutz, Bussins, Krup, and Henschel. The specification agreed was for a cross country capable, amphibious, all wheel drive, run flat tyres, steel cab, NBC protection, and a multifuel engine. In 1975 the German Army & MAN signed the contract to produce 4x4, 6x6 and 8x8 vehicles. The 4x4 or KAT I & KAT I A1 vehicle is the type 452 (and 462 with fitted winch). They are powered by a V8 Deutz diesel engine and are mainly flatbed or covered type trucks. The distinctive cab with the cut away corners stems from the need for the vehciles to be rail transported on standard flat cars. Earlier trucks had fixed cabs but later ones tilting ones which made engine maintainance much easier. All vehicles feature a mount for a MG3 machine gun (basically an MG42!). The Kit The kit arrives on 12 sprues plus the drivers cab and the tyres, a nice inclusion is masks for the windows. For a standard 4x4 truck the box is packed with parts. Construction starts with the gear box and differentials for the transmission. These are made up and the suspension components (air bags & springs) are added. The tuck chassis is then made up from a surprising number of components and the gear box, differentials and drive shafts are then added. These are highly detailed and made up from a number of components. Once the chassis is finished the wheels can be built up, the tyres added and then they are attached to the chassis. Work then moves to the cab. The dash board is built up with some of the drivers foot controls added underneath it. The base plate of the cab has the gear controls and a few other parts added then the dash is fitted. Once this is in the drivers seat and steering wheel are added along with the bench seat for the passengers. This is then the lower part of the cab complete. Moving onto the upper part the windows added along with a couple of internal parts and the main rear bulkhead. The upper cab can then be attached to the floor. The spare wheel and carrier are completed and attached to the cab, followed by the main doors being completed and added. The rightside equipment locker is also built up and added. On the outside of the cab the front bumper is added along with the roof hatch, mirrors, wipers and parts for the engine hatch. The completed cab can then be added ot the chassis. After this is done the exhaust system is built up and added. Along with some additional parts under the cab. Next up the truck bed needs to built up. The side stanchions are added to the flat bed and the drop down side panels can then be added. The fixed head board is added along with the steps to access up the cab. If the seating for the rear bed is to be used this then must be made up, and added. Weapons racks can then be made up and attached to the head board if using the seating. Moving on to the underside of the truck bed supports are added along with the mud flaps and racking for ancillary equipment. This includes fuel cans, wheel chocks and equipment lockers. Hoops and the frame for the tilt covering for the flat bed can then be added if needed. If the modeller wants the rear to be covered then they will need to make their own covering. To be honest any plastic moulded one will not probably look great so in a way its good they left this off. Once the load bed is complete it can be added to the chassis and the truck is then complete. Decals Theses are minimal as the vehicles did not carry many markings. Decals are supplied for a UN attached truck in overall white and a KFOR deployed vehicle. Conclusion It is great to see a modern support vehicle being made available, this gives many diorama possibilities as well as a great stand alone model. The kit is nicely complex and should build up to be a great looking kit. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  15. Hi all T-28 from Hobbyboss, 1/35. OOB The model is made for the customer. Cheers Martin
  16. Hobby Boss 2018-2019. Sources: https://www.facebook.com/TrumpeterModel/photos/a.220979711393963.1073741904.103526326472636/900262410132353/?type=3&theater https://www.facebook.com/TrumpeterModel/photos/a.220979711393963.1073741904.103526326472636/900284243463503/?type=3&theater Cover Targets also called bins with tracks... V.P.
  17. ...and done !! Built this because I hadn't done a 'What If' for a while and really wanted to reinvigorate my atrophied 'mottling skills' such as they are. In the end I'm quite happy with it, built really easily with no big issues, nice detail straight from the box including a perfect wee etch fret. If you're in to Luft '46 and 1:48 (or even if you aren't), go out and get one of these Hobbyboss Ta152's, they're cheap, easily available and look really nice when they're done. Not sure what's next for 'What If'ing', maybe the new 1:72 Revell Gripen or another Rafale... Stay tuned, thanks for taking the time to look and or comment, please feel free to say anything at all. AFN Ian.
  18. Just a pic for scale. Well, this one is now finished, and I will be moving onto my next German project, which should be posted in WIP shortly. I had a few issues with the weathering with this one, and ended up going a little heavier on the mud than I planned, however, I do like the effect of the oils, and the fuel stains. My main worry was that this model would look too similar to my H35 Panzerwagen, recently finished, however, I think that it looks sufficiently different now.
  19. Forgotten Komet: Finished

    A ludicrous forgotten build: Started this to test Mr Color Luftwaffe paints back in May 2016. I lost the Morane mast aerial and then with my move, illness, life etc., it got put into a box and completely forgotten till yesterday. Looking closely, it needs said mast scratched/robbed, then some detail painting, final matt coat and she'll be ready for the shelf. What could possibly go wrong? Anil
  20. So, this was a quick paint job by my standards, considering I painted the base coat this time last week, but it's certainly one I'm proud of. I feel like the weakest aspect of the weathering are the wheels, however the paint did not want to stick to them, making me loathe to try too much.
  21. Rafale

    Hi everyone. Here's my attempt to dignify my long awaiting french beauty.
  22. Sea Gladiator

    Looking through the stash for my Revell reboot of the Matchbox Gladiator for the Matchbox GB I came across this. Its packed a little different with each sprue in a separate plastic bag and foam wrapped around the fragil integrally moulded parts. It is exquisitely moulded with restrained but crisp detail. Simple instructions to follow. Two versions and i and I will build the Malta defender but I think the paint job is a bit more detailed with a shadow scheme on the lower wing and black and white underneath the lower wings
  23. USS Alaska CB-1. 1:350

    USS Alaska CB-1 Hobbyboss 1:350 USS Alaska (CB-1) was the lead ship of the Alaska class of large cruisers which served with the United States Navy during the end of World War II. She was the first of two ships of her class to be completed, followed only by Guam; four other ships were ordered but were not completed before the end of the war. Alaska was the third vessel of the US Navy to be named after what was then the territory of Alaska. She was laid down on 17 December 1941, ten days after the outbreak of war, was launched in August 1943 by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation, in Camden, New Jersey, and was commissioned in June 1944. She was armed with a main battery of nine 12 in (300 mm) guns in three triple turrets. She was 808 feet 6 inches (246.43 m) long overall and had a beam of 91 ft 1 in (27.76 m) and a draft of 31 ft 10 in (9.70 m). She displaced 29,779 long tons (30,257 t) as designed and up to 34,253 long tons (34,803 t) at full combat load. The ship was powered by four-shaft General Electric geared steam turbines and eight oil-fired Babcock & Wilcox boilers rated at 150,000 shaft horsepower (110,000 kW), generating a top speed of 33 knots (61 km/h; 38 mph). The ship had a cruising range of 12,000 nautical miles (22,000 km; 14,000 mi) at a speed of 15 kn (28 km/h; 17 mph). She carried four OS2U Kingfisher or SC Seahawk seaplanes, with a pair of steam catapults mounted amidships. Her shakedown cruise took her to Chesapeake Bay and Trinidad and was followed by a period of yard work. She set off for the Pacific in mid-November 1944, and reached the Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor on 13 January 1945. She crossed the Pacific to Ulithi with TG 12.2, and at the start of February 1945 she joined TG 58.5, which included the carriers USS Saratoga CV-3 and USS Enterprise CV-6), as part of the carrier screen. She took part in the final stages of the fighting on Iwo Jima, the invasion of Okinawa, and supported the fast carriers during their raids on the Japanese Home Islands and in the East China Sea. She was awarded three battle stars for her World War II service. On 10 February the Alaska sailed as part of TG 58.5. This was the first major carrier strike on the Japanese Home Islands, and was intended to provide cover for the invasion of Iwo Jima. Poor weather prevented the Japanese from attacking the US fleet. The ship was then moved to TG 58.4 to support the invasion of Iwo Jima. Her task force wasn't attacked during the nineteen days the Alaska was based off Iwo Jima. On 14 March the fleet left Ulithi to conduct another raid on the Japanese home islands, this time with the aim of destroying Japanese aircraft before the invasion of Okinawa. The Alaska was still with TG 58.4, which contained the carriers Yorktown (CV-10), Intrepid (CV-11), Independence (CVL-22) and Langley (CVL-27), and once again was part of their anti-aircraft screen. The carriers hit airfields at Usa, Oita and Saeki on 18 March. The Alaska finally got to fire her guns in anger on this day when Japanese aircraft attacked the fleet. Her first target was a Yokosuka P1Y 'Frances', which was targeting the carrier Intrepid, but that was destroyed by a direct hit from the Alaska. This marked the start of a day of kamikaze attacks, but most were shot down by the carrier's fighter aircraft or heavy AA gunfire. The Alaska claimed a second victory over a 'Judy'. On 19 March the carriers sent their aircraft against Japanese warships in the Inland Sea. Once again the US fleet came under air attack. The carriers Franklin (CV-13) and Wasp (CV-18) were both hit. The Alaska and her sister ship USS Guam (CB-2) were allocated to a new salvage unit, TU 58.2.9, which was formed to protect the Franklin. The unit contained the two Alaska class ships, the light cruiser Santa Fe (CL-60) and three destroyer divisions. The damaged carrier made for Guam, covered by TU 58.2.9. The other carriers from TG 58.2 provided more distant cover. On the afternoon of 19 March the small fleet was approached by two aircraft. One was identified as a friendly, but the other was a 'Judy', which was able to attack and escape unscathed. The Franklin was also undamaged, but the Alaska suffered her only combat casualty of the war when several men suffered flash burns. The Alaska escorted the Franklin until 22 March, when she was freed to rejoin TG 58.4. Late that day a Japanese submarine was detected close to the group, and it was rammed and sunk on the following morning. The Alaska returned to her position in the anti-aircraft screen while the carriers bombarded Okinawa. In late March the Alaska was ordered to bombard the island of Minami Daito Shima, 160 miles east of Okinawa, while on her way to refuel. She fired 45 12in shells and 352 rounds of 5in anti-aircraft shells at the island on the night of 27-28 March, without any response from the island. TG 58.4 refuelled and then returned to Okinawa to protect the invasion forces. The Alaska supported the invasion of 1 April, and also provided anti-aircraft cover. The Japanese navy attempted to send a suicide sortie of heavy ships to Okinawa, but they were repulsed by carrier aircraft on 7 April. Amongst their victims was the giant battleship Yamato. During April the Alaska covered the fast carriers as they operated against targets on Okinawa and on Kyushu. She claimed one assist and one victory on 11 April and three victories and three assists on 16 April, although on the same day the carrier Intrepid was hit. The Alaska returned to Ulithi to replenish on 14 May, after two months at sea. The 5th Fleet now became the 3rd Fleet, and the Alaska thus became part of TG 38.4. The group now included the carrier Ticonderoga (CV-14) and the battleship Iowa (BB-61). The fleet sailed in late May, and once again the Alaska formed part of the anti-aircraft screen. She also carried out another shore bombardment, this time hitting Okino Daito Shima, close to Minami Daito Shima, on 9 June, when her targets were Japanese radar bases. The Alaska spent the period between 13 June and 13 July resting at San Pedro Bay, Leyte. She was then allocated to the new Task Force 95, the first US surface fleet to enter the East China Sea since the attack on Pearl Harbor. The task force, which also included the Guam, encountered very little resistance during three sweeps into the East China Sea, operating from a base at Buckner Bay on Okinawa. After the Japanese surrender the Alaska formed part of the 7th Fleet's occupation forces. She visited the Yellow Sea and the Gulf of Chihli, before reaching Inchon in Korea on 8 September 1945 to support US troops that were occupying the southern part of Korea. She then moved to Tsingtao a former German possession on the Chinese coast taken by the Japanese early in the First World War. The US Marines occupied the port in October. The Alaska finally left the Far East in November as the start of a 'Magic Carpet' trip back to the United States. She reached Boston on 18 December 1945, where she prepared to be inactivated. She was placed in commission in the reserve on 13 August 1946 and out of commission on 17 February 1947. She was struck off on 1 June 1960 and sold for scrapping later in the year. The Model With so many maritime subjects being released over the last 5 years or so it’s great to see that there are still plenty of new and previously un-kitted subjects around. If you had asked me 10 years ago if I would see many of these subjects in any scale, let alone 1:350 then I would have probably said no. But we are living in a golden age of modelling, and no subject can be written off. Thus, we have the USS Alaska, designated as a heavy cruiser, she is more of a battle cruiser with her 12” guns surpassing those of the Scharnhorst and Gneisenau which were designated battle cruisers. The kit comes in quite a large box, appropriate, since the hull is just over 700mm long. The artwork depicts the ship at sea, with her light AA guns blazing away. Inside the box there are fourteen sprues, the single piece hull, two deck sections and four separate parts all in grey styrene, two small sprues of clear styrene, four quite large sheets of etched brass and a small decal sheet. The moulding is superb, particularly the hull, (I’d love to see the moulds this parts come out of), which has the smallest of detail on the lower bow, A number of sprues have been given extra protection with foam wrapping, as well as the standard poly bags in which the sprues are contained. There is no sign of flash, warping or other imperfections, with perhaps the exception of one bilge keel which looks slightly strained on its sprue gates. There are quite a few moulding pips though which will increase the time to clean up the parts. Despite its size, it doesn’t look a particularly difficult build, but you will need some experience with using PE as there are some parts that are made entirely of brass. Construction begins with drilling out of certain holes in the two deck sections, before attaching them to the hull. Turning the hull upside down the two bilge keels are attached, followed by the four propeller shafts, A frames, propellers and three piece rudder. With the hull right side up the decks are fitted out with the numerous bitts and cleats, ventilators, windlasses, four piece cable reels and three piece winches. The pair of three piece intake towers are the fitted amidships, whilst a three piece deckhouse is fitted aft, just forward of the stern 40mm gun tubs. There is a similar deck house fitted just aft of the anchor cables, for which there is a length of chain provided, followed by the two, three piece bow anchors, the main breakwater and a pair of 20mm gun tubs abaft the bridge. There are two, two piece catapult towers fitted amidships, while further aft there are more 20mm and 40mm gun tubs attached. Eight carley floats, stacked three high are then glued into position, followed by four AA controller towers and their respective controllers, while on the fo’c’sle another AA controller tub is attached to a small deckhouse, which, in turn is glued between the hawse pipes, and the Jack staff glued in place. Eight sub-assemblies are then built up using a combination of plastic and PE, with the exception of the bow mounted 40mm tub, the rest are ventilators. There are twelve two piece 20mm Oerlikons fitted from bow to abaft the bridge, and there are three float baskets fitted just forward of the breakwater. Aft of the catapult towers, twenty more 20mm Oerlikons and twelve more float baskets are fitted. The bridge structure, which includes B barbette on the lowest level, which is fitted with two more decks and the base of the foremast, with separate ships bell, as well as four triple stacks of carley floats, and two PE boxes fitted one per side of deck 02. Deck 02 is also fitted with a pair of 40mm gun tubs and for ventilators, while deck 03 is fitted with deck 04, which in turn is fitted with the armoured bridge and a deckhouse, followed by deck 05. Two searchlight platforms, with searchlights are fitted, one per side of the lower foremast, while the myriad of observation and controller sights are fitted around the decks and in additional cylindrical towers. All around the superstructure there are PE vertical ladders and some of the smaller railings to be added. On 02 deck the railing include the netting that goes around the two 400 mm tubs on that deck. More sub-assemblies are made up, again using PE and plastic, these being the main radar array, main battery controllers and secondary battery controller stations. The foremast is then assembled with several platforms separated by additional blocks and topped off with a large yardarm, more observation equipment, forward main battery rangefinder and radar array and the main radar platform main search radar array. This section of the tower is then fitted to the base fitted to the bridge earlier, along with a secondary battery controller. The funnel is made up form two halves, with additional parts fitted internally as well as externally, including searchlight platforms, claxon horns, walkway, multi-piece PE funnel cap and railings for the different platforms. It is finished off with the attachment of a large PE mast fore and aft, the foreward one with a navigation radar array, and the aft with a large yardarm. The aft superstructure is made up of two decks and fitted out with more ventilator intakes, PE gas bottles, vertical ladders, deckhouses and two tall controller towers. It is also fitted with the small AA controllers, and four 20mm Oerlikons. The funnel assembly is the glued to the foreward end of the superstructure, while a main battery rangefinder and radar assembly is fitted to eh tallest of the two towers, while the shorte one mounts a secondary battery controller. The bridge assembly and aft superstructure assembly are then glued to their respective positions on the deck and the four PE inclined ladders are folded and glued into place. Near the aft end of the aft superstructure there are two deckhouses, each fitted with two 400mm gun tubs, each fitted with more PE gas bottles, vent intakes and support columns. Just forward of these is a separate deckhouse which will mount the ships cranes.. Each quad 40mm Bofors mount is made from five parts, and there are fourteen of them to be assembled. Each one is then glued into one their gun tub. The two catapults the ship carried are made almost entirely of PE. Each catapult consists of eleven parts. When assembled they are fitted to their towers amidships. The two cranes are also mostly PE and consist of fourteen parts. These are fitted to their respective positions just aft of the catapults. The crane mounts and separate 40mm gun tubs are fitted with netting, rather than railings. The secondary armament consists of six twin 5” turrets. Each turret is made from ten parts, and once assembled fitted into their positions. The main turrets of three 12” guns are each made from eighteen plastic and twe3lve PE parts. Again, once assembled their are fitted into their respective mounts. Lastly the two Seahawk aircraft are assembled from seven clear parts and, once painted, glued to the catapults. The finishing touch is to add the ships main deck railings, and the build is complete. Just mount the model on the stand and add the name plate, which is also provided. Decals The small decal sheet provides the ships number for the bow, national markings for the aircraft and a pair of Jacks and Ensigns, in two different styles. They are well printed and look to have pretty good opacity. Conclusion I’ve always liked the Alsakas and never thought I would see one released in my favourite scale. But Hobbyboss have done it again and released something we never thought we’d see. From the limited resources I actually have, or more to the point, could find in my library, the kit looks to be pretty accurate, although I’m not sure about the bow, which does have a very odd step in the stem that I can’t see in any diagrams or pictures. If it is wrong then it is easily rectified with some filler. Other than that it really does look like a great kit. Review sample courtesy of
  24. Marder III Ausf M Late HobbyBoss 1:35 History The Marder III was produced in two variants – Ausf H and Ausf M. They were based on the Panzerkampfwagen 38(t) Ausf H and Ausf M light tank chassis, respectively. They were designated as 7.5cm PaK40/3 auf PzKpfw 38(t) Ausf H, and Panzerjäger 38(t) mit 7.5cm PaK40/3 Ausf M. Both were armed with the 75mm PaK 40/3 L/46 anti-tank gun and operated by four-man crews. The Ausf H (Heckmotor-rear engine) had the fighting compartment in a central forward location, while the fighting compartment of the Ausf M (Mitte-mid engine) was at the rear. The fighting compartment of the Ausf H was open at the top and rear, while that of Ausf M was open only at the top. The Ausf H carried 38 rounds of ammunition, while Ausf M had only 27 rounds. The main armament could be traversed 30 degrees to the left and right in the Ausf H and 21 degrees to the left and right in the Ausf M. Both vehicles also had additional armament – the Ausf H had a 7.92mm MG 37(t) mounted in the front hull and the Ausf M carried a 7.92mm MG 34 or MG 42 inside the fighting compartment. Armour protection for the Ausf H ranged from 8 to 50mm, while armour for the Ausf M ranged from 8 to 20mm. Ausf M was the final variant of the Marder series and was a significant improvement over previous models, with its lower silhouette, sloped armour and much more functional fighting compartment. From November 1942 to April 1943, BMM made 243 Ausf H models, and an additional 175 vehicles were converted in 1943. From April 1943 to May 1944, BMM produced 975 Ausf M models. Ausf M was modified during production, and early and late models can be identified by their unique features. The Ausf H was first issued to Panzerjäger Abteilungen in late 1942. They also served with Waffen SS (e.g. Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler in Russia, 1942) and Luftwaffe (e.g. Herman Göring Division in Tunisia and Italy, 1943) units. In April 1944, 18 Ausf H were also exported to Slovakia. Ausf M was first issued to Panzerjäger Abteilungen in May 1943. It fought on all fronts, and there were still 350 in service as of February 1st 1945. The Marder III Ausf H and Ausf M were also used to produce self-propelled guns armed with 150mm sIG heavy infantry guns and designated as Grille/Bison Ausf H and Ausf M. There was also a proposed project to mount a Panzerjäger 38(t) Ausf M with a 75mm PaK L/60 anti-tank gun, but it was never produced. In 1945, a number of Marder III Ausf H and Ausf M models ended up in use by the Czechoslovak Army as ST-II (Stihac Tanku II). The Model Depicting a Marder III Ausf M - Late, this is yet another reboxing of an old Tristar kit, and like the others reviewed here it has exactly the same layout box top as the original, with just the Hobbyboss title replacing the old Tristar label. The colourful boxart shows an artists impression of the vehicle pared up in a street. Inside there are seven sprues and one separate part in sandy yellow styrene, three of dark grey styrene, a very small sheet of etched brass, a metal barrel and a mid-sized decal sheet. Hobbyboss are proving to be pretty consistent with their moulding, in that the parts are all beautifully moulded, with no signs of flash or other imperfections other than a fair few moulding pips which will add to the cleaning up of parts. From what I can gather, the Tristar kit was pretty accurate and rated as a kit, and since Hobbyboss haven’t done anything to the sprues it can be said of this kit as well. Construction begins with the lower hull being fitted with two pairs of torsion beams each side, along with a single two piece return roller per side. The spring suspension units are then added, as are the bump stops and two piece rear bulkhead to which the separate gun cradle can be attached if not in use. The axles are then glued to the torsion beams and fitted with end caps, while the drive covers are fitted to the front of the hull and the idler axles fitted to the rear. Each road wheel is fitted with the separate outer rim before being attached to the axles, each wheel is then fitted with an inner and outer central hub. The two piece drive sprockets and two piece idler wheels are then attached to their respective axles, and the front bulkhead of the fighting compartment is fitted inside the hull, followed by the compartment decking. The front deck and glacis plate are moulded as a single unit, to which the drivers five piece hatch, complete with vision ports is glued into position. The gun cradle brackets are also attached, along with a seat in the fighting compartment. The assembly is then glued to the lower hull. The tracks are up next, with each side requiring 95 individual links. Since there doesn’t appear to be any pins moulded onto the links, you will have to glue them together, then try and get the sag over the single return roller looking right, or go and buy a metal set of tracks, (my personal preference). The two front sections of the track guards are then fitted with the various storage boxes and pioneer tools, including the ubiquitous jack, spade and pick axe, before being attached to the hull. The rear sections are then fitted with seats, fire extinguisher, shell rack and a back rest, as these are going to be within the shield of the fighting compartment. A long length of track, (12 links), is then fitted to the glacis plate and held down by a long bracket. Two, three piece shell racks are then assembled and fitted out with the separate shells before beign glued into place, as is the curved lower mantle section. The main gun slide is made up from eight parts, whilst the gun itself is made up from eight parts. Now the modeller has an option with the barrel, either the single piece styrene barrel, which is very nice, or the metal barrel provided. They are as good as each other and the spare may come in handy for another build. The guns cradle is assembled using eleven parts and once completed is fitted with the slide and gun assemblies. The gun shield is then fitted out with various components before also being glued to the cradle. The gun assembly is then attached to the hull via the large pin moulded to the cradle and the side shields, fitted with the radio set and exhaust pipe, glued into place around the fighting compartment. The three piece exhaust system is then glued to the rear bulkhead. The front sections of the shield are glued into place, as are the rear aerial mounts, shield cross bar, two track guard supports right forward, gun cleaning rods, three piece shrouded headlight, and another length of track links on the lower glacis plate, completing the build. Decals The decal sheet contains markings for numerous vehicles, seeing as most of the sheet is made up of individual numbers in two different colours, along with four German crosses. They are well printed, in register and nicely opaque, also being fairly glossy with very little noticeable carrier. The only differences in the vehicles is the paint scheme, there being a choice of either panzer grey overall, or three coloured camouflage of sand, red brown and green. Conclusion From the box this looks like a lovely kit, there’s nothing to taxing for most modellers, although the track links might get a bit tiresome to get looking right. The rest of the kit si well detailed, well moulded and should be a joy to put together. Review sample courtesy of
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