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Found 11 results

  1. Books of References?

    Our second child has just moved away from home and now I can get a real 'ManCave', as opposed to modelling ind the livingroom! I have emptied the bookshelf for all my references - eg. "In Action", "Modellers Data File", "Lock on" etc. - and started to think about it - when was the last time I read in those? I have become so accustomed to go online for references, I hardly ever look in these books anymore! It's just, that I loved reading in these books and be inspired by a certain paintscheme or the history of a certain plane/tank/ship and then go out and buy the kit of the subject. Now I buy the kit and THEN go online for references! Am I alone in this? Or am I just starting to loose it....? Cheers Hans J
  2. Have any of you purchased or read any of the output from said publisher? I've seen some positive reviews (e.g. the Scale War Machines channel on Youtube) but I'm not too sure about spending quite a lot on so little in terms of page count. Do they provide enough insight? Are they constructive for someone who would like to hit a good standard in figure painting and wants to know how the best painters do it? If you like them, which one or two titles would you say are standouts? Alternative recommendations are, of course, equally welcome.
  3. There appear to be two books out right now on the Spitfire dive-bombing offensive against V-2 rockets. I'm trying to figure out which one is right for me (as the kids say) and I was hoping that anyone who's read either or both of them would be willing to weigh in on what they thought of 'em. Spitfire Dive Bombers versus the V-2, by Bill Simpson, which is 258 pages or Operation Big Ben, by Craig Cabell, which is rather shorter at 176 pages. If anyone has any input, I'd be ever so grateful. Thanks!
  4. What are you reading?

    since we have chat threads for "what have you last purchased?" and "what music are you playing?", I thought it would be interesting to talk about what we modellers are reading in the spare time between model building and real life Books, magazines, reference material, fiction, technical, ... anything is acceptable. So, just to kick start, I've been reading the Portuguese translation of Svetlana Aleksievitch's "Vrémia Second Hand" (original Russian title), which was translated to Portuguese as "O Fim do Homem Soviético - Um Tempo de Desencanto" and to English as "Second-Hand Time". It's a book about the end of the USSR (hence the title: The End of the Soviet Man), how was life in the Soviet Union and how it is now in the ex-Soviet Republics, especially in Russia. It's a tough and deeply tragic read but quite gripping. Highly recommended to anyone interested in History and in understanding the USSR and present-day Russia. Cheers Jaime
  5. Avro MANCHESTER Warpaint Series No.103 The Manchester's origins go back to Specification P.13/36 of 1936, which the Air Ministry tendered out to eight different companies, requiring proposals for a new medium bomber. Of those proposals tendered Avro's design for the Type 679 was placed first, with the Handley Page H.P.56 second, both twin-engined machines which were to be engined by the underdeveloped and controversial Rolls Royce Vulture X-inline engine. Eventually a contract for two prototypes were awarded to Avro who produced the airframes L7246 and L7247. The Air Ministry specification also quoted requirements for a bomb capacity of 8,000lbs (3,629kg) which was envisaged as: sixteen 250lb (113kg) and eight 500ib (227kg) or four 2,000lb (907kg) bombs (other parts of the specification also quoted for the ability to carry two 18in (45.7cm) torpedoes). Avro responded by quoting their design could achieve 12,000lbs (5,442kg) which could be six 2,000lb bombs. The highest possible cruising speed was requested which at 15,000ft (4,572m) had to be at least 275mph (442km/h). Defence weaponry would need to include nose and tail turrets, mounting two and four machine guns respectively. The Book The book has been produced and printed to the standard and easily recognised format of all previous Warpaint series publications; with the familiar blue front cover being overlaid with a photo of the named aircraft in flight, plus a colourful line drawing inset. On turning the cover we are presented with a colourful four-view plan and profile illustration of the aircraft, beautifully drawn and colour-defined by Richard J. Caruana to his usual high quality layout. Another for-view illustration is produced inside the back cover. The history of the Avro Manchester is covered very well by the author Tony Buttler, who has obviously researched this aircraft in detail in which he describes and provided details over twenty two of the forty pages, including covers. Tony's observations about the Manchester being a failure, virtually from inception, is interesting and informative; including the elements that led to the development and production of the Lancaster. There is a total of sixty four black and white photographs printed throughout the book, all with detail information about the type, serial, location and date where known. There are also three sets of tabulated data which provide details of specifications; squadrons, units and their representative aircraft; plus a section on kits, decals and accessories; all being listed by scale. The information on this latter data sheet has been supplied by Hannants and therefore is presumed to be up to date at the time of print. Some of the photographs will be really useful for the modeller wishing to identify marking details, as with the demarcations of the ripple effect camouflage separation from the black sides, as in the images below. Stapled within the centre pages is a two-sided A3 landscape formatted set of plans of the Manchester drawn to 1:72 scale. The drawings show the Manchester I and Ia versions and include the Frazer-Nash FN-5 front; FN-4 rear; Fn-7 dorsal and the FN-21a (dustbin) ventral turrets. As before, these drawings are finely drawn and detailed by Richard J. Caruana and should be of immense use for the modeller. There are no fewer than twenty seven full colour profile illustrations of this aircraft. Each has a short narrative beside the illustration, describing the type, serial, squadron, date and event for which this aircraft was marked up or coded for; as with the first one below - L7417/ZN-V which was lost on May 19th 1942. Close in photographs are included in a short section towards the back of the publication and these provide details of specific elements, including the Fraser-Nash FN-21a ventral turret mount. Conclusion The Avro Manchester is considered to be one of the failures in British military aviation, with its time spent in service with Bomber Command not being a happy one. The aspects leading up to its production, service life, plus the transition to the making of the Lancaster heavy bomber are all described in clear detail in this fine book. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of .
  6. Modelling Guides

    Hello everyone, I'm a complete newbie with Britmodeller and at modelling, making a return to modelling after a gap of nearly 60 years! I thought I might try and bridge at least my knowledge shortfall (the skills will hopefully come with practice) by having for reference a book or two on such subjects as Aircraft modelling tips and techniques and even those on airbrushing and finishing. Among the myriad of books out there, with your help I'm hoping to find one or two good ones! Has anyone any recommendations, please? With many thanks and kind regards, Patrick.
  7. New books from Casemate!

    A thread to keep you all updated on the latest modelling books from Casemate and our distributed publishers. Click on the jacket images of the books to link through to the website with more info. - Casemate UK
  8. Hello from Casemate!

    We are Casemate UK - a major publisher and distributor of history titles. We distribute many varied titles, hopefully many of which you know and love (many modelling titles from Kagero), and we are also going to sponsor some of your group build competitions and *hopefully* attempt a build of our very own in the coming months! We look forward to hearing from many of you and finding out how fun model building can be! We will keep you all updated on any discounts and special offers that we have going in store or online too, so you can make sure to get the most for your money! - Casemate UK
  9. USS Lexington Squadron At Sea book This book, another in the series of Squadron at Sea, this time concentrating on the life, and death of the carrier USS Lexington. Originally designed, and in fact construction had started, as a battlecruiser armed with eight sixteen inch guns and fitted with engines that produced 180,000hp giving her a speed of 35 knots. Her keel was laid down in 1921at the Fore River shipyard, Quincy, Massachusetts. Unfortunately due the signing of the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922 the plans for the four battlecruisers of the class were cancelled. As the Treaty stated, two ships currently under construction were allowed to be converted to aircraft carriers. Thus, the Lexington and Saratoga were saved and conversion started almost immediately whilst the Constellation and Ranger were scrapped on the stocks. Lexington was launched on 3rd October 1925, once completed she was commissioned on 14th December 1927. As is the format of these series of books there is a potted history as the introduction with annotated photographs showing the construction as both a battlecruiser and the conversion to an aircraft carrier. The rest of the book is filled with 235 annotated photographs covering the whole career of the Lady Lex, through her refit of 1937, the removal of her four 8” gun turrets in March 1942, and her demise in May 1942. Whilst all the photographs are in black and white, there are still very evocative of the times with some excellent detail shots that would prove very useful for the maritime modeller. There are also fourteen colour plates of the ships air compliment throughout her career and of the ship itself, with descriptive text telling of how the Naval paint schemes varied and were made up. Conclusion This is another great book from Squadron publications. Whilst the text is mainly made of notes under each photograph, there is a lot of information, a lot of which was new to me. There are one or two typographic errors, but they are very minor. If building either Trumpeter 1:350 or 1:700 kits, this book will be invaluable. The information given about the differences between the Lexington and the Saratoga, means that it would be possible to build either ship at almost any point in their careers through the transfer of parts. I can recommend this book whole heartedly.
  10. Me262 Shwalbe reference book needed

    Hi guys, Just taken delivery of the great loooking Hobby Boss 1/48 Me262A-1A/U2 'VO56'. I'm going to build this as a Me262A-1A day fighter and I've decided I need a good reference book. While the Eddie Creek books would be great, no chance I've got a zillion £'s to get all four of them! So, can someone recommend a single point of reference book that has good detail shots, some colour pics etc for around the £20 mark please. Thanks, Ruari
  11. IJN Battleship Haruna Kagero Super Drawings in 3D The IJN Haruna and her sisterships Kongo, Hiei and Kirishima were the last battleships designed by British naval engineer George Thurston. They were more like heavily armed and armoured battlecruisers than standard battleships. Armed with eight fourteen inch guns Haruna fought in almost every major naval action of the Pacific Theater during World War II. She covered landings of Japanese forces in Malaya (in present-day Malaysia) and the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia) in 1942 before engaging American forces at the Battle of Midway and during the Guadalcanal Campaign. Throughout 1943, Haruna primarily remained at Truk Lagoon (Micronesia), Kure Naval Base (near Hiroshima), Sasebo Naval Base (near Nagasaki), and Lingga (in present-day Malaysia), and deployed on several occasions in response to American carrier airstrikes on Japanese island bases. Haruna participated in the Battle of the Philippine Sea and the Battle of Leyte Gulf in 1944, engaging American vessels in the latter. In 1945, Haruna was transferred to Kure Naval Base, where she was sunk by aircraft of Task Force 38 on 28 July 1945 The book is in the form of Kageros 3D format with the first thirteen pages dedicated to the history of construction, modernisations, armour protection, powerplant, individual weapons systems and operational history of this great ship. The rest of the book is filled with highly detailed 3D renderings of every part of the main decks and superstructure. All the drawings are supremely well done and will be an absolute goldmine of information for the locations of the many different bits of smaller equipment not normally shown in side drawings or plans, such as all the rigging wires and there attachments. The addition of a pull out double sided sheet, with line drawings of the superstructure on one side and side views in all in1:350 scale on the reverse is a very nice bonus, and very helpful, particularly with the rigging of the ship. Conclusion A brilliantly laid out book with superbly drawn and rendered pictures plus a good potted history of this great looking ship. I can highly recommend this book to all interested in the Haruna, and could possibly be used for certain construction details of other ships in the class.. Review sample courtesy of
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