Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Weekend'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Group Builds
  • Model Show Calendar

Forums

  • Site Help & Support
    • FAQs
    • Help & Support
    • New Members
    • Announcements
  • Aircraft Modelling
    • Military Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Civil Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Aircraft
    • Ready for Inspection - Aircraft
    • Aircraft Related Subjects
  • AFV Modelling (armour, military vehicles & artillery)
    • Armour Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Armour
    • Ready for Inspection - Armour
    • Armour Related Subjects
    • large Scale AFVs (1:16 and above)
  • Maritime Modelling (Ships and subs)
    • Maritime Discussion by era
    • Work in Progress - Maritime
    • Ready for Inspection - Maritime
  • Vehicle Modelling (non-military)
    • Vehicle Discussion
    • Work In Progress - Vehicles
    • Ready For Inspection - Vehicles
  • Science Fiction & RealSpace
    • Science Fiction Discussion
    • RealSpace Discussion
    • Work In Progress - SF & RealSpace
    • Ready for Inspection - SF & RealSpace
  • Figure Modelling
    • Figure Discussion
    • Figure Work In Progress
    • Figure Ready for Inspection
  • Dioramas, Vignettes & Scenery
    • Diorama Chat
    • Work In Progress - Dioramas
    • Ready For Inspection - Dioramas
  • Reviews, News & Walkarounds
    • Reviews
    • Current News
    • Build Articles
    • Tips & Tricks
    • Walkarounds
  • Modelling
    • Group Builds
    • The Rumourmonger
    • Other Modelling Genres
    • Britmodeller Yearbooks
    • Tools & Tips
  • General Discussion
    • Chat
    • Shows
    • Photography
    • Members' Wishlists
  • Shops, manufacturers & vendors
    • Aeroclub Models
    • Air-Craft.net
    • AJ Aviation - Jan & Tony
    • A.M.U.R. Reaver
    • Atlantic Models
    • Bernd.M Modellbau
    • BlackMike Models
    • Casemate UK
    • Collett's Model Shop
    • Copper State Models
    • Creative Models Ltd
    • DACO Products
    • Freightdog Models
    • Gizzmo Heaven
    • Hannants
    • Hobby Colours & Accessories
    • Hobby Paint'n'Stuff
    • Hypersonic Models
    • Iliad Design
    • Japan:Cool
    • Kagero Publishing
    • Kingkit
    • L'Arsenal 2.0
    • Modellingtools.co.uk
    • Maketar Paint Masks
    • Marmaduke Press Decals
    • MikroMir
    • Mirage Hobby
    • MJW Models
    • The Hobby Shack
    • Models4Hobby
    • Models R Go
    • NeOmega & Vector Resin
    • Parkes682Decals
    • Pheon Models
    • Pocketbond Limited
    • Precision Ice and Snow
    • Radu Brinzan Productions
    • Red Roo Models
    • Relish Models
    • SBS Model - Hungary
    • Scale-Model-Kits.com
    • Scale Model Shop Ltd
    • Small Stuff Models
    • Sovereign Hobbies
    • Special Hobby
    • Sphere Products
    • Starling Models
    • Stormfront Models
    • StoryModels.com
    • T7 Models
    • The Hobby Den
    • The Real Model Shop
    • Thunderbird Models
    • Tiger Hobbies
    • Tirydium Models
    • Topnotch - Bases and Masks for Models
    • Ultimate Modelling Products
    • Valiant Wings Publishing
    • Videoaviation Italy
    • White Ensign Models
    • Wild House Models
    • Wonderland Models
  • Archive
    • 2007 Group Builds
    • 2008 Group Builds
    • 2009 Group Builds
    • 2010 Group Builds
    • 2011 Group Builds
    • 2012 Group Builds
    • 2013 Group Builds

Categories

  • New Features
  • Other

Found 41 results

  1. Hellcat Mk.I 1:48 Eduard Weekend Edition The Royal Navy received 252 F6F-3s as Hellcat I under Lend-Lease. Production continued until November 1945 by which time 7870 F6F-5s had been built, of which some 930 had been supplied to the Royal Navy as Hellcat II and 1434 of the total had been completed as F6F-5N night-fighters. Ultimately, the Hellcat equipped 14 FAA front-line squadrons. The first Hellcat Mark Is started to be delivered to the Fleet Air Arm on 13 March 1943, FN321 and FN323 arriving three months later, in June 1943 to the A and C Flights of A&AEE, Boscombe Down for service trials by RN pilots, and in July 1943 FN330 was tested by 778 squadron at Crail. Very soon afterwards the Hellcat was distributed to operational squadrons, 800 Squadron received its first Hellcats in batches in July, August and October 1943, and 1839 squadron from December 1943. Not long after this, on 31 August, 1943 the first combat sorties were being flown by the USN VF9 and VF-5 squadrons aboard USS Yorktown against Japanese targets on Marcus Island (Minami-tori Island) some 700 miles southeast of Japan. The first and second batches of 188 F6F-5 Hellcat Mark IIs started to be delivered to the Royal Navy from May 1944, primarily to 1840 squadron. By this time many Hellcats were being shipped to overseas FAA squadrons directly from Norfolk, Virginia, USA to HMS Thane 14 August 1944 and on to RNARY Wingfield, then onto 804 Squadron in September 1944. The subsequent batch of 295 Grumman F6F-5 Hellcat Mk F.II was also shipped directly to RNARY Wingfield in HMS Ranee in September 1944, and on to RNARY Coimbatore. Many of these Hellcats were still in service in Ceylon (Sri Lanka) after the end of the war and into 1946. However, quite a number were surplus to requirement after VJ-Day and dumped in the sea off Australia by HMS Colossus in 1945. The final 293 Hellcat II to be delivered to the Fleet Air Arm arrived between January and May 1945, the very last aircraft, being delivered on 11 May 1945. The Hellcat served post war and some of the earlier batches managed to remain in RN service, in 709 squadron. After this aircraft was paid off it went to Fairey Aviation at Hayes in 1946. Whilst Grumman F.II KE209 remained as the personal aircraft of the Lossiemouth Station Flight Commanding Officer Caspar John until 1952, and the Aircraft Holding Unit in 1954, (this aircraft is now on display in the Fleet Air arm Museum at Yeovilton, Somerset). The Kit The Eduard kit has now been with us since 2008 and has been regularly re-issued in multiple boxings. The moulds still look good today though. Construction starts in the cockpit. The seat, rear bulkhead and control column are attached to the cockpit floor. Next the side consoles and instrument panel are added (a decal can be used for the panel if you don't want to paint it), Once the cockpit is complete it can be added into the fuselage halves along with the tail wheel. Don't forget to open the hole for the centre line tank if you want to use it. Next up the engine is made up. This has two banks of cylinders to which the gear box is added at the front, along with the shaft for the prop. Once complete this can be added to the front of the fuselage and the cowling built up and added over it. Construction then moves to the rear of the fuselage with the addition of the tail surfaces and rudder. The main wings are next on the build schedule. They are conventional upper/lower, left & right. The wheel wells need adding as does the appropriate wing armament before the two sides are glued together. Separate control surfaces are supplied for both wings. Once the wings are on construction moves back to the main fuselage with lights being added to the underside. Next step is the construction of the main wheel bays with some additional details. Following this the main wheels are built up and attached to their legs. The gear doors can then be added. Is using it the main fuel tank can be built up and added. Lastly the canopy, prop, and night fighter radar unit can be added. Decal options are provided for two aircraft as seems to be the norm for weekend editions now. Hellcat Mk. I 1/48 - s/n JV105, No. 800 Squadron FAA, HMS Emperor, Aegean Sea, September 1944 Hellcat Mk. I 1/48 - s/n FN430, flown by P/O Hannay, No. 1844 Squadron FAA, HMS Indomitable, Indian Ocean, August 1944 Each option is illustrated with a four-view profile. The decals, which are printed by in house, they look crisp, thin and glossy and the colours used are nice and bold. Conclusion This is a great kit from Eduard, good to see it in this configuration. Recommended. Review samples courtesy of
  2. Fw 190F-8 Weekend Photo Etch and Pre-cut Masks 1:72 Eduard Eduard's latest addition to their extensive range of radial-engined Fw 190s is the Weekend edition of the F8 fighter-bomber. Now they have released a set of photo etched details and pre-cut masks, so you can convert your Weekend kit into a Profipack with fewer decal options... Fw 190F-8 Photo Etched Parts The photo etched pack includes two small frets. The pre-painted set includes parts for the cockpit, including harnesses for the seat, a new instrument panel, details for the sidewalls and other parts. The second fret contributes a set of rudder pedals, as well as some aerial and details for the landing gear bays. Being the fighter-bomber variant, replacement ballistic tails for the various bombs are also included. Fw 190F-8 Pre-Cut Masks The masks cover the canopy but not the landing gear wheels. Conclusion This is a sensible and worthwhile upgrade for Eduard's rather excellent kit, although you could save yourself some time and trouble by just seeking out the Profipack version of the kit. Nevertheless, these sets include all of the extra details that you would want. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  3. Bf.109G-6 Mtt Regensburg 1:48 Eduard WEEKEND There must have been billions of words written on the Bf.109 over the years, which was the mainstay of the Luftwaffe's fighter arm, despite having been superseded by the Fw.190 and others during its service life. It kept coming back to prominence due partly to it being a trusted design, the manufacturer's sway with the RLM, and the type's ability to be adapted as technology advanced. The G or Gustav as it was known was one of the later variants, and probably one of the better ones, with improved armament that give it a distinctive pair of blisters in front of the windscreen, plus mounting points for the 210mm rocket tubes used to disrupt the bomber streams in long range attacks using timed detonation. The other minor changes were targeted at defensive means, removing the mounting points and hardware for long-range tanks etc. The Kit This is a re boxing of Eduard's second attempt at the G after there first one hit a few snags. This weekend edition boxing features aircraft built at the Regenburg factory with their typical cowling, early canopy & tail unit. The cockpit is first, with all the basic details you could want, including a clear fuel line which you paint leaving a little section clear to represent the inspection tube. You could add a coat of clear yellow to imply there's some fuel in the line if you like. With the cockpit complete the new fuselage halves are closed up and a choice of shrouded or un-shrouded exhaust stubs are inserted. Incidentally, Eduard have some beautiful resin update sets for the cockpit and exhausts if you wanted to go for the ultimate in detail, and we'll be reviewing those shortly, adding links as we go. The new fuselage halves don't include the whole rudder, as you have an option of one with or without a horn-balance later on. The cannon troughs are backed with additional tubing and the barrels, then added to the nose along with the supercharger trumpet and those prominent cannon bulges that change the look of the nose. The tail is next, the fin sections of which fit to the root via two pins, with the elevators fitting the same way to the sides. All the flying surfaces are separate with tabs fitting into recesses to allow deflection at your whim. Check which parts to use for the rudder by referring to your chosen decal option, as the straight rudder only applies to two choices. The upper wing halves fit on the lower after the bays are done, with detail moulded into their undersides to complete the bay. The completed wing is then attached to the underside of the fuselage and work on the flying surfaces, gravity activated leading-edge slats, radiator housings, and the sleek oil-cooler under the nose, which sits on four pegs so that it sits flush with the surrounding panels. Finally, the flaps are added, which have separate upper and lower parts, the fit of which is shown from the side in an accompanying scrap diagram to remove any confusion. The shortened landing gear legs are attached to the three-part wheels and bay cover, then inserted into the substantial socket in the gear bays, needing only the brake hoses to complete them. Although there are a number of props on the sprues, only one is used in this boxing, with a single part containing all blades, sandwiched between the boss parts. The canopy is one of the defining aspects of these aircraft improves the look immensely. There is a choice of two for the various marking options, with the windscreen having the same options. There are two styles of drop-tanks included, one of which has a tapered bottom for improved ground-clearance, and a pair of cannon pods are also in the box. Markings As usual with weekend edition there are two options on the sheet, and from the box you can build one of the following: Bf 109G-6/R6/trop, flown by Oblt. Emil Josef Clade, CO of 7./ JG 27, Kalamaki, A Greece, January 1944 Bf 109G-6/R6, W.Nr. 18807, flown by Ofw. Alfred Surau, 9./JG 3, Bad Wörishofen, Germany, September 1943 Both decal sheets are printed in-house on a very blue backing paper with super-shiny carrier film, but the register, colour density and sharpness is excellent, with a pair of complete swastikas on one corner ready to be cut off if local laws could be a problem. The usual halved versions are the other side of the dotted line in this event, so you can suit yourself. Conclusion What is a great kit is now being released in the weekend series which is very welcome. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  4. Messerschmitt Bf 109F-4 1:48 Eduard WEEKEND The Messerschmidt Bf 109 is one of the iconic aircraft of WWII. The F-4 would use the 1332hp DB601E engine which would be fitted with a broader balded propeller for improved altitude performance. The aircraft would carry the new Mauser MG151 20mm cannon with 200 rounds per gun. Production of the F-4 would start in May 1941 and last a year with 1841 examples being built, 576 of these being the tropicalised version. The Kit Construction starts shockingly enough with the cockpit. Various control wheels and the main control column is added along with the armoured seat back. Following this the seat pan and rudder pedals are added. A full set of photo-etched belts is provided for the pilots seat. Following this side panels and parts are added into the fuselage sides. The instrument panel is made up at this time. Once all of these sub-assemblies are made up they can be placed inside the fuselage and this closed up. As well as the cockpit the tail wheel and exhausts need to be added before the closure takes place. Once the main fuselage is together the intake needs to be added on the side. For the tropical version this will need the additional filter adding as well. Construction then moves to the rear of the main fuselage with the tail planes and rudder being added. All of the control surfaces are separate so can be posed as needed by the modeller. Next up are the wings. The lower is one part with left and right uppers. The wheel well detail needs to be added into the lower wing and then the uppers can be added on. Once complete the wing assembly is mated with the main fuselage. Next up the leading edge slats and ailerons can be added. On the underside of the wing the left and right radiators are assembled and added to the wing. The flaps can then be added making sure to get the radiator flaps at the correct angle. Moving towards finishing the model the main landing gear units are completed and added to the model. The wheels are a single part with a left and right hub. The gear leg is attached as is the door. The canopy parts can then be added not forgetting the pilots head rest & armour in the main centre part. Last but not least for the main kit the propeller and spinner are added. Decals Decals are in house from Eduard and should pose no issues. There is a main sheet and a supplemental sheet for the stencils, markings are provided for 2 examples; Bf 109F-4/Z/trop flown by Uffz. F. Schweiger, 6./JG 3, San Pietro, Italy, February 1942. Bf 109F-4/Z W. Nr. 13125 flown by Oblt. M. – H. Ostermann, CO of 8./JG 54, A Siverskaya, Soviet Union, Beginning of May 1942. Conclusion This is a welcome new F-4 release from Eduard now available in their Weekend edition boxing. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  5. FW190F-8 Weekend Edition 1:72 Eduard The Focke-Wulf Fw 190 was designed by Kurt Tank in the late 1930s. His aim was to create a fighter that was not only fast and agile, but also reliable. It had a wide track undercarriage to improve ground handling and also utilised electric rather than hydraulic controls to reduce the risk of system loss in combat. The Fw 190 also marked a departure from aircraft like the Bf109 and Spitfire as it combined a 14 cylinder radial engine with a development of the NACA cowling system. This choice was crucial as it meant that the Fw190 would not create additional demand for DB 601 liquid cooled engines. It also allowed a low drag profile for such a powerful engine. Despite early teething problems, the Fw 190 first entered operational service over France in August 1941. It proved to be quite a shock for the RAF whose 1440hp Spitfire Mk.V, the best fighter available at the time, was outclassed in terms of firepower and all round performance, particularly at lower and medium altitudes. The Fw 190 F8 was a fighter-bomber variant developed from the A8 fighter, but with a revised supercharger for improved low-altitude performance and bomb racks under the wings and fuselage. Eduard have long been capable of churning out excellent kits, but in 2011, with the release of their Hellcat series, that they really set a new standard for plastic kits in the smaller scales. Since then, they have added several superlative kits to their lineup, including the BF110 series, MiG-15 and MiG-15UTI series and their latest release, the Spitfire Mk.IX. They are still adding to their range of Fw 190s though, the newest of which is the F-8. This version of the kit is part of the Weekend range, which means it omits the paint masks, photo etched details and and multiple decal options of the Profipack range in favour of a lower price. The kit itself is made up of over 200 plastic parts spread across of three sprues of blue-grey plastic (although a significant number of these are not used for the F8) and a single clear sprue with the now-familiar circular layout. The instruction book is a glossy, stapled booklet with full-colour painting diagrams. As you would expect from Eduard, the quality of the plastic parts is second to none. The mouldings are clean and crisp and there are no traces of flash or sink marks. The surface detail on the outside of the airframe comprises recessed panel lines and delicately engraved rivet and fastener detail. It looks absolutely superb. Eduard haven't skimped on the detail elsewhere either; sub-assemblies such as the cockpit are right up there with resin items when it comes to the quality and quantity of detail. The cockpit is truly phenomenal for a kit of this size, even without photo etched parts - in fact the only thing I would add would be harnesses for the seat. Once assembled, the whole thing can be sandwiched inside the fuselage halves along with the firewall and the basic-but-good-enough-in-this-scale engine. Setting the semi-completed fuselage to one side for a moment, construction turns to the wing. The lower wing is moulded as a single span, to which the main spar (which also forms the rear wall of the main landing gear bays) must be added. The other parts which form the structures and details of the landing gear bays must also be added at this point, prior to everything being fixed in place by the addition of the upper wing surfaces. If you wish to use the supplied bomb racks, remember to drill out the appropriate holes at this point. The ailerons are moulded separately to the rest of the wing, which opens up some possibilities for the diorama builder, as well as enhancing the level of realism. Turning back to the fuselage, the rudder is also moulded as a separate part while the tail planes are solid lumps. In common with other kits of the type, the upper fuselage forward of the cockpit is moulded separately (in this case as two parts with a third for the cannon barrels). Once the basic airframe is together, it’s time to fit the undercarriage and other finishing details. Each of the main gear legs is made up of two parts. The wheels themselves are made up of nicely moulded tyres and separate hubs. This should make painting them much easier. As this is the F8 version, you get an extra sprue containing a wide choice of ordnance including a drop tank, three different types of bomb and two different types of rockets and launch rails. A number of small parts are included to cover the final details, including the aileron balance weights and various aerials and antennae. The canopy deserves a special mention as there are different parts for closed and open options. Two propellers are included as well, although only one is needed for the included options. Because this is a Weekend edition kit, two schemes are catered for on the decal sheet – an FW190F-8 of SG-2, Hungary, Late 1944/early 1945 (as depicted on the box artwork) and an aircraft of Stab III/SG 10, Vysoke Myto, Czechoslovakia, May 1945. This aircraft is finished in an interesting scheme, with an RLM 83 fuselage, RLM 74/75 upper wings, and RLM 76 undersurfaces with a yellow rudder and band around the cowling. Four-view colour profiles are printed in the instructions, while there is a seperate diagram for the stencils. The decals themselves look thin and glossy, so hopefully they will prove easy to apply. Conclusion While we're not exactly short of kits of this type, there's no denying that Eduard have delivered the definitive kit of the Fw190 as well as providing a prime example of the kit maker's art. The level of detail they have packed in is as superb as the engineering is excellent, and the kit appears to be accurate in every major way. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  6. Fokker D.VII OAW 1:48 Eduard Weekend The Fokker D.VII first appeared over the western front in the late spring/early summer of 1918, as the Great War was entering its final phase leading up to the November Armistice. Much has been written about it, but it was an outstanding fighter often awarded the accolade of being the finest such machine produced by any side in the conflict. It is also well known that it was the only aircraft specifically named by the allies in the Armistice agreement; such was its fearsome reputation as a killer. The Eduard Fokker D.VII has been around since 2005, and released in all major versions (Fokker, Albatros, and O.A.W). Much of the basic kits are the same but Eduard provides different fuselages on a separate sprue depending upon the version. In fact they supply two complete fuselage halves per kit. Although building the same aircraft, Fokker, Albatros, and O.A.W. each had their own variations, most notably in the front cowling panels and exhaust pipe location. And even within manufacturer, these features could vary, hence Eduard very welcome decision to provide two fuselage types per manufacturer. This is a much appreciated touch, as it makes building much simpler and easier. I find it sometimes irritating with other manufactures where you have to attach so many inserts and panel per version, that it is hard to get a neat airframe with everything flush, so full marks to Eduard here. I built this one from the Royal class boxing a few years ago. This latest release is a ‘Weekend’ edition which gives you a basic kit without the etched brass fret or kabuki masks of the top of the range ‘Profipack’ or ‘Royal Class’ kits. The simplified box art shows Jasta 19’s Wilhelm Leusch’s well known ‘Dragon’ scheme, and a side profile of Franz Meyers attractive MFJ III scheme. Lifting the box lid reveals the four familiar sprues, all of which are still as sharply moulded as ever and show no sign of flash or sink marks. The only change I noticed was that the usual olive coloured plastic has been replaced with a medium grey colour on three of the four sprues. Sprues A and B hold the wings and tail surfaces, with nicely defined rib detail. Also present are some interior parts and the Mercedes DIIIa engine. A selection of 4 propellers are provided, covering Axial, Wolff, Heine, and Niendorf types. Sprue C holds all the delicate parts such as struts, seat mountings, control column, rudder pedals, compass etc. Also included is Eduard's clever 'stitching' insert that fits in a channel on the fuselage underside, to represent the stitched fabric seam found there. Plus it has the benefit of hiding the fuselage join. Sprue D offers the manufacturer specific fuselage halves, other boxings have the Fokker and Albatros versions, but here we have the O.A.W ones along with the appropriate radiator and exhaust pipe. The Meyer machine uses halves 1 and 2 (with the semi-circle cooling gills) while the Leusch version uses fuselages 3 and 4 (with the long cooling gills). Meyer fuselage; Leusch fuselage; All the fuselages beautifully represent the fabric covering over the steel tube skeleton. There are subtly defined 'facets' of each section down the sides, which really need to be seen close up to fully appreciate. Decals. Most previous ‘Weekend’ kits I have seen offer only one decal option, but unusually we have two here. A. Wilhem Leusch, Jasta 19, October 1918. B. Franz Meyer, MFJ III, 1918. The welcome surprise is that a full set of upper and lower lozenge decals are supplied, along with a full set of rib tapes to go over them, in both salmon pink and blue. Having built many of these kits in the last 10 years or so, I can offer a few pointers to ensure a happy build; It is important to line up all the internal bulkheads to fit in their recesses in the opposing fuselage half, as the engineering is to very fine tolerances. Common sense really, but double check before committing to glue.Prime and paint the wings in a base colour such as pale blue underneath, and medium green on top. The lozenge decals need a painted surface to ‘bite’ onto and adhere properly. Putting them on to bare plastic won’t work.Glue all four undercarriage struts into the axle wing, and let it set before attaching to the fuselage. You can check right after gluing that the top of each strut finds its mounting hole on the fuselage, then put it aside.Depending upon final colour scheme, if possible attach the forward strut assemblies to the assembled, but bare plastic fuselage. This will ensure a strong join, and if like the two schemes here, won’t interfere with painting the final colours.Lozenge fabric colours are a minefield to wander in to, it seems everybody has a different opinion. I have a preference for toning my models down, just lightly. To this end I usually give lozenged surfaces a very light coat of thinned Tamiya ‘Smoke’, in one or two passes from my airbrush. I like the harmonised and blended look it gives, reducing the harshness of what can otherwise appear as a stark finish. It is however a matter of personal taste, and I offer it here as an opinion rather than a criticism.Conclusion. Eduards Fokker D.VII is one of the best 1/48 Great War aircraft kits ever produced. It assembles accurately and easily, and perfectly captures the look of the original machine. There is hardly any rigging (a cross brace in the undercarriage, and a few simple control cables), which further adds to its appeal for those who are put off by it. Stretched sprue will easily deal with this, and even a total absence is not very noticeable. It is in fact one of my all time favourite kits and subjects, and over the years I have purchased at least one of every release of it, from single kits, through Dual Combos, up to the beautiful ‘Royal Class’ edition. There are so many attractive colour schemes for the D.VII, many of them offered in the Eduard kits and even more can be found on aftermarket sheets. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of Also available is a Wheel mask set
  7. F6F-3 Weekend Edition 1:72 Eduard The Grumman F6F Hellcat was a highly effective fighter, the design of which took advantage of experience gained in aerial combat against the Japanese during the early part of the war. Fitted with a powerful Pratt and Whitney ‘Double Wasp’ engine, the Hellcat was a fast fighter, capable of 380mph. The F6F-3 was the first production version and was armed with six .50 inch Browning machine guns. Later in the production run it gained the ability to carry unguided rockets and bombs as well. The Hellcat was a rugged aircraft which featured self-sealing fuel tanks and plenty of armour. By 1945 it had gained the status of the most effective US naval fighter of World War II, having accounted for no fewer than 5,271 enemy aircraft. I remember reviewing Eduard’s 1:72 Hellcat when it was first released, and it's hard to believe that six years have passed since then. This kit is still very much a spring chicken in modelling terms, and very much state of the art as far as detail and engineering are concerned. Inside the top opening box are 74 plastic parts spread across three grey sprues and one clear sprue. As this is a ‘Weekend’ edition, there are no photo etch parts or canopy masks, but you do get two decal options and a full set of stencil decals. The quality of the plastic parts is nothing short of superb, making this kit something of a bargain. The engraved detail on the surface of the airframe is up there with the best that I have ever seen. There is an intelligently designed blend of recessed panel lines on parts such as on the flying surfaces, and overlapping panels on the rear fuselage. The mouldings are all clean and crisp, with no traces of flash or sink marks. The rest of the kit doesn’t disappoint either. The cockpit is beautifully represented and features delicate, raised details. The main landing gear bays are of convincing depth and are also beautifully detailed. The wings fit into recesses in the fuselage sides, so there should be no join to fill at the wing roots and misalignment of the wings should be all but impossible. Two choices of tyres are provided, each with different tread patterns. Both are moulded separately to the wheel hubs, which should make painting the tyres and hobs nice and easy. The engine and cowling are nicely moulded and Eduard have captured the shape of the lower intake for the oil cooler and supercharger (the famous Hellcat ‘grin’) very well. The transparent parts are thin and clear, and the sliding part of the canopy is moulded separately to the windscreen. Because this is a Weekend edition kit, two schemes are catered for on the decal sheet – an F6F-3 flown by LTJG Arthur Singer of VF-15, USS Essex, October 24-25 1944 (as depicted in the box artwork) and an F6F-3, flown by Lt. Lochridge, VF-38, Guadalcanal, late 1943. Four-view colour profiles are printed in the instructions, while there is a seperate diagram for the stencils. The decals themselves look thin and glossy, so hopefully they will prove easy to apply. Conclusion I’ve said it twice before and have no problem saying it again; this is an excellent kit. The level of detail is superb, the engineering is great but not overly complex and in Weekend Edition guise it is superb value for money. Review sample courtesy of
  8. Fokker DR.1 Weekend Edition 1:72 Eduard One of the best known and most recognisable aircraft of the First World War, the Fokker Dr.I was developed in response to the appearance of the Sopwith Triplane over the skies of the Western Front in early 1917. Although it couldn’t match other fighters for speed, either in a straight line or in a dive, its initial rate of climb was good and it was supremely manoeuvrable. The Fokker was used by a number of aces, most notably Manfred von Richthofen who scored his final 20 victories in the type until he was shot down and killed on 21 April 1918. This kit is the latest in Eduard's revamped 'Weekend Edition' series, which enables you to build a model as nature intended, unfettered by tiny bits of photo etched brass and a bewildering choice of decal options. Inside this particular box is a single runner containing just 35 plastic parts and a small sheet of decals. The plastic parts first saw the light of day seventeen years ago, and have been released umpteen times since then, including once by the mercurial Smer. The parts are nicely moulded, with no traces of flash but a respectable amount of moulded detail. The cockpit comprises six parts, including a floor, seat, control column and instrument panel. As this is a profipack, there are no photo etched parts, but a set of seat harnesses is provided on the decal sheet. Once the fuselage halves have been joined, he lower and middle wings can be added, along with the brace of forward-firing machine guns. The wedge shaped horizontal tail is moulded as a single, solid part, as is the vertical tail/rudder. The upper wing is the last major part of the airframe to be added, along with the outer struts, which slide through the middle wing to join both lower and upper wings together. A fairly basic engine is included, but Eduard to produce a resin replacement if you wish to add detail here. Once the engine and cowling have been fitted, all that remains to do to finish the model is to add the propeller, landing gear and tail skid. One advantage of the DR.1 is the minimal amount of rigging required to complete the model. Two marking options are included: 479/17, flown by Lt August Raben, Jasta 18, Montingen, France, October 1918; and 195/17, flown by Lt Hermann Vallendor, Jasta 2, Halluin, France, April 1918. The decal sheet is small, but nicely printed. Conclusion This is an appealing kit, largely because of its simplicity. In contrast to some of their more modern kits, Eduard made it no more complex than it needed to be, and as a result, it majors on modelling pleasure and buildability. What better way than to start a collection of WWI subjects? Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  9. F6F-5N Nightfighter (84133) 1:48 Eduard Weekend Edition With the success of the F6F-3 already in service, the F6F-5 was the natural evolution based on combat experience. Key improvements in the F6F-5 were a more powerful engine utilising a water injection system, revised windscreen that had a single armoured windscreen and spring loaded aileron tabs. The night fighter version came into service in the fall of 1944 was designated the F6F-5N and this was easily identified by the wing mounted AN/APS-6 Radar protruding forwards from the starboard leading edge, and the 20mm canon in the wing. While all F6F-5 aircraft could carry a 20mm Cannon in each wing along with a pair of .50 Cal machine guns, only the night fighter version used this operationally. The British designated the Night fighter version as the Hellcat NF II. My respect goes out to these pilots. Flying a single engined aircraft over the sea at night must be quite an intimidating experience, let alone with the prospect of combat mixed in. The Kit The Eduard kit has now been with us since 2008 and has been regularly re-issued in multiple boxings. The moulds still look good today though. This boxing has the basic plastic plus the edition of resin parts for the guns and radar carried by this version. Construction starts in the cockpit. The seat, rear bulkhead and control column are attached to the cockpit floor. Next the side consoles and instrument panel are added (a decal can be used for the panel if you dont want to paint it), Once the cockpit is complete it can be added into the fuselage halves along with the tail wheel. Dont forget to open the hole for the centre line tank if you want to use it. Next up the engine is made up. This has two banks of cylinders to which the gear box is added at the front, along with the shaft for the prop. Once complete this can be added to the front of the fuselage and the cowling built up and added over it. Construction then moves to the rear of the fuselage with the addition of the tail surfaces and rudder. The main wings are next on the build schedule. They are conventional upper/lower, left & right. The wheel wells need adding as does the appropriate wing armament before the two sides are glued together. Separate control surfaces are supplied for both wings. Once the wings are on construction moves back to the main fuselage with lights being added to the underside. Next step is the construction of the main wheel bays with some additional details. Following this the main wheels are built up and attached to their legs. The gear doors can then be added. Is using it the main fuel tank can be built up and added. Lastly the canopy, prop, and night fighter radar unit can be added. Decal options are provided for two aircraft as seems to be the norm for weekend editions now. F6F-5N, VF(N)-90, USS Enterprise 1945 F6F-5N, Bu.No. 78704 Capt R Baird, VMF(N)-533, Le Shima, Okinawa, June 1945. Each option is illustrated with a four-view profile. The decals, which are printed by in house, they look crisp, thin and glossy and the colours used are nice and bold. Conclusion This is a great kit from Eduard, good to see it in this configuration. Recommended. Masks If needed masks are also available for this kit. Review samples courtesy of
  10. Fw 190A-5 Light Fighter (7439) 1:72 Eduard Weekend Edition The Focke-Wulf Fw190 was designed by Kurt Tank in the late 1930s. His aim was to create a fighter that was not only fast and agile, but also reliable. It had a wide track undercarriage to improve ground handling and also utilised electric rather than hydraulic controls to reduce the risk of system loss in combat. The Fw190 also marked a departure from aircraft like the Bf109 and Spitfire as it combined a 14 cylinder radial engine with a development of the NACA cowling system. This choice was crucial as it meant that the Fw190 would not create additional demand for DB 601 liquid cooled engines. It also allowed a low drag profile for such a powerful engine. Despite early teething problems, the Fw190 first entered operational service over France in August 1941. It proved to be quite a shock for the RAF whose 1440hp Spitfire Mk.V, the best fighter available at the time, was outclassed in terms of firepower and all round performance, particularly at lower and medium altitudes. The A-5 was developed when it was determined that the Fw 190 design could carry more ordnance. The engine was moved forward 6 inches thus moving the centre of gravity and allowing more weight to be carried aft. The Kit Eduard now seem to be on a mission to produce a long line of Fw 190 kits in 1.72 so the modeller of "The one true scale" does not miss out. The Fw 190A-8 profiPACK was reviewed here, the Royal Class boxing here, and the PROFIPACK boxing here. The kit itself is made up of twosprues of dark blue-grey plastic and a single clear sprue with the now-familiar circular layout. The instruction book is a glossy, stapled booklet with full-colour painting diagrams. Included are a sheet of colour photo etched parts, and a sheet of masks. All together, the impression is of a quality package. The quality of the plastic parts is second to none. The mouldings are clean and crisp and there are no traces of flash and no sink marks. The surface detail on the outside of the airframe comprises recessed panel lines and delicately engraved rivet and fastener detail. It looks absolutely superb. Eduard haven't skimped on the detail elsewhere, with sub-assemblies such as the cockpit being up there with high end resin items when it comes to the quality and quantity of detail. The cockpit is made up of over thirty parts (including photo etched details), which is a truly phenomenal for a kit of this size.. Once assembled, the whole thing can be sandwiched inside the fuselage halves along with the firewall and the basic-but-good-enough-in-this-scale engine face. Setting the semi-completed fuselage to one side for a moment, construction turns to the wing. The lower wing is moulded as a single span, to which the main spar (which also forms the rear wall of the main landing gear bays) must be added. The other parts which form the structures and details of the landing gear bays must be added at this point, prior to everything being fixed in place by the addition of the upper wing surfaces. The ailerons are moulded separately to the rest of the wing, which opens up some possibilities for the diorama builder, as well as enhancing the level of realism. Turning back to the fuselage, the rudder is also moulded as a separate part, although the tail planes are solid lumps. In common with other kits of the type, the upper fuselage forward of the cockpit is moulded separately (in this case as two parts with a third for the cannon barrels). Once the basic airframe is together, its time to fit the undercarriage and other finishing details. Each of the main gear legs is made up of two parts, The wheels themselves are made up of nicely moulded tyres and separate hubs. This should make painting them much easier. Ordnance is taken care of with a drop tank and a single bomb, along with the associated racks and shackles. There are a number of small parts included to cover the final details, including the aileron balance weights and various aerials and antennae. The canopy deserves a special mention as there are four rear sections included; blown and unblown, with different parts for closed and open options. Two propellers are included as well, although only one is needed for the included options. Decal options are provided for two aircraft as seems to be the norm for weekend editions now. Fw 190A-5 Stab JG 54, Soviet Union, Spring 1943. Fw 190A-5 Flown by Oblt. Rolf Strohal, StabI./JG.1, Deelen, Netherlands April 1943. Each option is illustrated with a four-view profile. The decals, which are printed by in house, they look crisp, thin and glossy and the colours used are nice and bold. In addition to the main sheet there is a sheet of Stencils printed. Conclusion Eduard have continued to deliver outstanding kits of the famous fighter, as well as providing a prime example of the kit maker's art. The level of detail they have packed in is as superb as the engineering is excellent, and the kit appears to be accurate in every major way. It is good to see this now in a weekend edition, it can be highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  11. From a year and a half ago or so... Weekend edition with SBS Resin seat and vanes (plastic-card) on pitot added. Finished in airbrushed tamiya acrylics, details in Vallejo and weathered with oils. Going to be sold on that auction site so I thought I'd share it with you guys.
  12. From a year and a half ago or so. Weekend e-3 kit (priller jg51 one) with superfabric belts added. AM decals. Quite a bit of work along the spine (top and bottom) to restore the rivets as they were very shallow. Also oil cooler/chin had a bad seam but think that was my fault getting the engine block in wrong and throwing things out of alignment. Primed in mr surfacer and sprayed in 02/71 over 65 with xtracrylics, masked with tamiya tape for the hard edge. 70 prop and spinner. Oil washes and some postshading for weathering. Their satin varnish at the end. Another one thats gonna be sold so thought I'd immortalise it here first... Great kits, got a load in the stash of these still to do. Hope you like it.
  13. Yakovlev Yak-3 1:48 Eduard Weekend Edition The YAK-3 had a slightly stop start entry into Russian service. Its origins can be traced back to a 1941 design the I-30. Like the original Yak-1 it was to feature a 20mm cannon firing through the propeller hub and two wing mounted machine guns. The armament was improved by the addition of a pair of wing mounted cannons. The first Yak-3 had a metal wing with slats, and the second a wooden wing to simplify production. The German invasion, and a shortage of aircraft grade alloys lead to the projects cancellation. Jump then to 1943 and Yakolev looked at improvements to the Yak-1 design. To make a lighter aircraft the wing was re-designed and the intakes moved to the wing roots. More use was made of wood in the new design as well. So good was the new aircraft that it was recommended that it replace the original Yak-1 & Yak-7. The new aircraft would be designated the Yak-3. As an addendum to the Yak-3 story in the late 1990s Yakolev would manufacture new build aircraft for the warbird market. These would feature an all metal construction and be powered by an Allison engine. The Kit Eduards YAK-3 has been with us now since 1998 and has seen many re-releases since then. the it arrives on two sprues of grey plastic, a clear sprue and a sheet of decals. The moulding is good and the detail crisp. There is no evidence of any deterioration of the moulds, no flash etc. Construction starts with cockpit. Interior parts are added to both sides and the rear decking behind the cockpit is added. Next the tail wheel part is added, the engine exhausts added and the main fuselage is closed up, adding the engine top cover which houses the guns. The cockpit floor on the kit is moulded onto the top side of the upper wing. Once the main wings are joined together (conventional upper & lower construction) the seat is added with seat belts coming from the decal sheet. The control column and rudder pedals are added. Next up the side consoles are added along with the main instrument panel. Once all the cockpit details are in the wing can be joined to the main fuselage. Next up the landing gear is constructed. The main wheel is two parts and added onto the main gear leg. These are then added to the main gear bay door. There is a scissor link to be added to the main leg. The legs and their retraction struts are then added onto the wing along with the smaller inner gear doors. The tailplanes are added along with the large ventral radiator. The tail wheel and its doors are then also added. Lastly the propeller is made up and added along with the canopy. Remember to add the rear pilots head armour before adding the canopy. Eduard give is a single, and multipart canopy. Decals Decals are provided for two aircraft, as seems to be the Weekend edition norm now. White 15, Lt Semyon Ivanovich Rogovoi, 64th GIAP, 2nd Baltic Front, Autumn 1944. White 6, Capt Marcel Albert, GC 3 Normandies, Niemen 1944/45. Conclusion It is great to see this kit re-released in a weekend edition. While the kit is not upto the latest Eduard standards it is by no means a slouch and certainly will build into a good looking model. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  14. Fw 190A-5 Weekend Zoom Set & Masks 1:72 Eduard The Zoom photo-etch set provides details for mainly the cockpit of the aircraft. You get a new instrument panel, and cockpit side panels, seatbelts and other cockpit fittings. For the rest of the airframe there are parts for the landing gear, and a couple of aerials. As well as the photo-etch set Eduard do a set of masks for the kit. These are for the canopy only. Conclusion If the modeller wants to add some extra to the weekend Fw 190A-5 then the photo-etch is for you. Masks are always handy in this scale for the larger canopies of this aircraft. Recommended.
  15. Fw 190A-8/R2 1:72 Eduard Weekend Edition The Focke-Wulf Fw190 was designed by Kurt Tank in the late 1930s. His aim was to create a fighter that was not only fast and agile, but also reliable. It had a wide track undercarriage to improve ground handling and also utilised electric rather than hydraulic controls to reduce the risk of system loss in combat. The Fw190 also marked a departure from aircraft like the Bf109 and Spitfire as it combined a 14 cylinder radial engine with a development of the NACA cowling system. This choice was crucial as it meant that the Fw190 would not create additional demand for DB 601 liquid cooled engines. It also allowed a low drag profile for such a powerful engine. Despite early teething problems, the Fw190 first entered operational service over France in August 1941. It proved to be quite a shock for the RAF whose 1440hp Spitfire Mk.V, the best fighter available at the time, was outclassed in terms of firepower and all round performance, particularly at lower and medium altitudes. The Fw190A-8 was the ultimate evolution of the radial-engined fw190s and entered service in 1944. It featured improvements such as extra fuel, improved armour and nearly 2000hp output with emergency boost. The A-8/R2 replaced the outer 20mm cannon in the wings with Mk.108 30mm cannons. The Kit Following on from the Royal, Profipack and standard boxing's; the Weekend Editions are now arriving from Eduard. These new Fw 190 kits from Eduard are setting a new standard in 1.72 for excellence. The kit itself is made up of 92 plastic parts spread across of two sprues of dark blue-grey plastic and a single clear sprue with the now-familiar circular layout. The instruction book is a glossy, stapled booklet with full-colour painting diagrams. All together, the impression is of a quality package, at the great weekend price point. The quality of the plastic parts is second to none. The mouldings are clean and crisp and there are no traces of flash and no sink marks. The surface detail on the outside of the airframe comprises recessed panel lines and delicately engraved rivet and fastener detail. It looks absolutely superb. Eduard haven't skimped on the detail elsewhere, with sub-assemblies such as the cockpit being up there with high end resin items when it comes to the quality and quantity of detail. The cockpit is made up of over thirty parts (including photo etched details), which is a truly phenomenal for a kit of this size. Once assembled, the whole thing can be sandwiched inside the fuselage halves along with the firewall and the basic-but-good-enough-in-this-scale engine face. Setting the semi-completed fuselage to one side for a moment, construction turns to the wing. The lower wing is moulded as a single span, to which the main spar (which also forms the rear wall of the main landing gear bays) must be added. The other parts which form the structures and details of the landing gear bays must be added at this point, prior to everything being fixed in place by the addition of the upper wing surfaces. The ailerons are moulded separately to the rest of the wing, which opens up some possibilities for the diorama builder, as well as enhancing the level of realism. Turning back to the fuselage, the rudder is also moulded as a separate part, although the tail planes are solid lumps. In common with other kits of the type, the upper fuselage forward of the cockpit is moulded separately (in this case as two parts with a third for the cannon barrels). Once the basic airframe is together, its time to fit the undercarriage and other finishing details. Each of the main gear legs is made up of two parts, although you have the option of removing the plastic torque links and replacing them with photo etched versions. The wheels themselves are made up of nicely moulded tyres and separate hubs. This should make painting them much easier. Ordnance is taken care of with a drop tank and a single bomb, along with the associated racks and shackles. There are a number of small parts included to cover the final details, including the aileron balance weights and various aerials and antennae. The canopy deserves a special mention as there are four rear sections included; blown and unblown, with different parts for closed and open options. Two propellers are included as well, although only one is needed for the included options. Decals There is one small sheet of stencil decals and one for the aircraft markings. As seems to be standard now decal options are provided for two aircraft: Fw 190A-8 of Werner Gerth, II.(Strum)/JG 3 "Udet" July 1944. Fw 190A-8 of Paul Lixfeld, 6/JG 300, late 1944. Each option is illustrated with a four-view profile as well as detailed illustrations of the propellers or drop tanks where appropriate. Conclusion This is a great kit from Eduard and it is good to see it released in a Weekend boxing. Highly Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  16. Nieuport 11 Eduard 1:48 Weekend edition The Nieuport 11 first appeared over the western front in early 1916, and made a massive contribution to ending the 'Fokker scourge'. It outclassed the Fokker Eindekkers in almost every respect, except perhaps that it did not posses a synchronised gun firing through the propeller. Its single Lewis gun was mounted on the top wing, and fired over the propellers arc of rotation. Its main innovation was the use of a sesqiplane layout, with a larger top wing and small narrow chord lower wing, connected by 'V' interplane struts. This gave both excellent manoeuvrability and field of view. The arrangement could be fragile in a dive however, and care was needed to avoid flutter and tearing the wings off. Known as the Bébé due to its diminutive size, the aircraft served in the front line for over a year, and was used by the air forces of France, Britain, Italy, Russia, and Belgium, with a total of over 7,000 produced. The Kit First released in the early 2000's, this latest release is a very welcome reissue. Offered as a 'Weekend edition' the box art features Armand de Turenne's tricolour painted Ni-11, with a small profile Raoul Lufbery's machine below. Inside are two sprues of beautifully moulded parts that are still as good and crisp as they were when first released several years ago. Everything is flash-free, and what few ejector pin marks there are, are well hidden where they will not be seen. The fuselage mouldings are especially good, with beautifully fine stitching and rivet detail. We are also supplied with a very nicely moulded little pilot figure, unusually in a standing pose to display by the finished model. This is a very nice touch, and most welcome. The smaller parts are all supplied on the second sprue, and again all is very finely moulded to an excellent standard. Several parts are not required, such as the Le Prieur rockets and their associated 'V' struts, and the headerest for the almost identical Nieuport 16, which is also kitted by Eduard. The model itself goes together very easily and accurately. I know because I have built several over the years, in both Ni-11 and NI-16 issues. There are no pitfalls to watch out for, it is pretty much a trouble free build. A couple of simple suggestions though; - Glue the cabane struts B30 and B31 to the unpainted fuselage before painting. This will give a nice strong join, and does not interfere very much with painting anyway. - Unusually, Roundels are carried on the under surfaces of both wings. Paint the underside of the top wing and apply the roundel decals to it before assembly. The Roundels cover the mounting holes for the tops of the 'V' struts, and you can't put them on after it is all assembled. There is a reason that I know this! A small clear moulded windshield is provided. This is actually mostly frame to be painted, with a central section left clear. Rigging is fairly minimal, and can be done fairly easily with stretched sprue. Alternatively, Invisible mending thread also works, and is my preferred method. Marking Options. Two options are supplied, the very attractive Tricolour machine of Armand de Turenne as featured prominently on the box art, and the more drab version flown by Raoul Lufberry. The box art and instructions depict very different shades of blue on the forward fuselage of Turenne's machine, dark on the box and overly bright in the instructions. The most likely shade is probably that of the roundels, so personally I would match my paint to the roundel blue on the decals. Conclusion. This is a lovely kit of an equally lovely little aeroplane. The mouldings are first class, and from experience I know that it is a trouble free build. With care it can be assembled without any need for filler, it is that good. It is also an ideal 'first biplane' as the inverted 'V' cabane strut and normal 'V' interplane struts make alignment virtually foolproof. Rigging consists of 3 lines per wing, an 'X' on the undercarriage, 2 tiny lines to the rudder, and 2 runs per fuselage side to the elevators. All very easily done with stretched sprue and white glue. The finished model beautifully captures the light and delicate look of the real Bébé , and is no bigger than a 1:72 Spitfire so you can build an display lots of them. It is hard to choose a favourite among Eduards exquisite range of WW1 aircraft, but this is definitely in my top 5. I am very pleased to see it available once again. This is one I made a few years ago, albeit not the same version as this release. It has the Le Prier rockets which were intended for Balloon busting, but were found to be inaccurate. Note the outlining on the flying surfaces, (see masking review) Highly Recommended. Also available is a Mask set Review sample courtesy of
  17. Fw 190A-8 Standard Wings 1:72 Eduard Weekend Edition The Focke-Wulf Fw190 was designed by Kurt Tank in the late 1930s. His aim was to create a fighter that was not only fast and agile, but also reliable. It had a wide track undercarriage to improve ground handling and also utilised electric rather than hydraulic controls to reduce the risk of system loss in combat. The Fw190 also marked a departure from aircraft like the Bf109 and Spitfire as it combined a 14 cylinder radial engine with a development of the NACA cowling system. This choice was crucial as it meant that the Fw190 would not create additional demand for DB 601 liquid cooled engines. It also allowed a low drag profile for such a powerful engine. Despite early teething problems, the Fw190 first entered operational service over France in August 1941. It proved to be quite a shock for the RAF whose 1440hp Spitfire Mk.V, the best fighter available at the time, was outclassed in terms of firepower and all round performance, particularly at lower and medium altitudes. The Fw190A-8 was the ultimate evolution of the radial-engined fw190s and entered service in 1944. It featured improvements such as extra fuel, improved armour and nearly 2000hp output with emergency boost. The Kit As sure as night follows day in the world of Eduard Kits following on from the Royal, Profipack and standard boxing's; the Weekend Edition will be along soon. These new Fw 190 kits from Eduard are setting a new standard in 1.72 for excellence. The kit itself is made up of 92 plastic parts spread across of two sprues of dark blue-grey plastic and a single clear sprue with the now-familiar circular layout. The instruction book is a glossy, stapled booklet with full-colour painting diagrams. All together, the impression is of a quality package, at the great weekend price point. The quality of the plastic parts is second to none. The mouldings are clean and crisp and there are no traces of flash and no sink marks. The surface detail on the outside of the airframe comprises recessed panel lines and delicately engraved rivet and fastener detail. It looks absolutely superb. Eduard haven't skimped on the detail elsewhere, with sub-assemblies such as the cockpit being up there with high end resin items when it comes to the quality and quantity of detail. The cockpit is made up of over thirty parts (including photo etched details), which is a truly phenomenal for a kit of this size. Once assembled, the whole thing can be sandwiched inside the fuselage halves along with the firewall and the basic-but-good-enough-in-this-scale engine face. Setting the semi-completed fuselage to one side for a moment, construction turns to the wing. The lower wing is moulded as a single span, to which the main spar (which also forms the rear wall of the main landing gear bays) must be added. The other parts which form the structures and details of the landing gear bays must be added at this point, prior to everything being fixed in place by the addition of the upper wing surfaces. The ailerons are moulded separately to the rest of the wing, which opens up some possibilities for the diorama builder, as well as enhancing the level of realism. Turning back to the fuselage, the rudder is also moulded as a separate part, although the tail planes are solid lumps. In common with other kits of the type, the upper fuselage forward of the cockpit is moulded separately (in this case as two parts with a third for the cannon barrels). Once the basic airframe is together, its time to fit the undercarriage and other finishing details. Each of the main gear legs is made up of two parts, although you have the option of removing the plastic torque links and replacing them with photo etched versions. The wheels themselves are made up of nicely moulded tyres and separate hubs. This should make painting them much easier. Ordnance is taken care of with a drop tank and a single bomb, along with the associated racks and shackles. There are a number of small parts included to cover the final details, including the aileron balance weights and various aerials and antennae. The canopy deserves a special mention as there are four rear sections included; blown and unblown, with different parts for closed and open options. Two propellers are included as well, although only one is needed for the included options. Decals There is one small sheet of stencil decals and one for the aircraft markings. As seems to be standard now decal options are provided for two aircraft: Fw 190A-8 of 2./JG 54, Lt. Hans Dortenmann, Villacoublay, France, June 1944. Fw 190A-8 of 12./JG 5, Herdia Airfield, Norway 1945. Each option is illustrated with a four-view profile as well as detailed illustrations of the propellers or drop tanks where appropriate. Conclusion It is good to see this great kit now released as a weekend edition. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  18. Spitfire Mk.XVI Bubbletop Weekend Edition 1:48 Eduard The Spitfire XVI was a variation on the IX that were built using Packard Merlins (licence built engines from the USA). They were optimised for low level operations and some had clipped wings, with a slightly bulged cowling to accommodate the changes. They were armed with two 20mm cannon with an additional pair of .303 machine guns inboard, and a great many of them had the reduced fuselage spine or bubble-canopy. Just over a thousand were built overall. The Kit We have reviewed both the ProfiPACK and Limited edition versions of the is kit from Eduard. Now Eduard have released this excellent kit as a Weekend Edition. The modeller gets 4 sprues of grey plastic, the canopy sprue and decals for two aircraft. Construction starts with the cockpit (where else!) detail parts are added to both sidewalls, then the rear cockpit bulkhead is added. The cockpit floor is built up along with the seat, the seat is then attached to its armour plate, and then to the floor. For this kit the seatbelts are supplied as a decal. This completed part is then added into the cockpit side and the control column is added. The front cockpit bulkhead along with the instrument panel is then added. Here the instrument panel is provided as a decal. The HUD is installed into the panel before it is attached to the cockpit side panel. Once all of this is finished the other cockpit side is installed. Once all of the cockpit is finished it can be inserted into the main fuselage along with the engine firewall, tail wheel housing, and front engine plate. The main fuselage can then be closed up. Construction then moves onto the wings. They are of conventional mode type with a one part lower wing, with left & right uppers. Concentrating on the lower wing the first job is to install the wheel wells. There are 15 parts for these which while a little complicated make up this complicated area very well. Once the wheel wells are dont the upper wing panels cane be added. The completed wing can then be attached to the main fuselage. The tailplanes are also added at this stage as are the engine exhausts, and the top engine cover. The separate tailplane control surfaces and rudder are added next. Construction then moves back to the main wing. The ailerons are added, then on the underside the (5 parts each side) radiators are added, then the separate radiator flaps are attached as well. The main wheels are added to their landing gear legs and the doors are attached. The tail wheel is added to its housing. The propeller is added to its spinner, then added to the aircraft, the pilots door is added, the cannon barrels are added to the wings; and then lastly the canopy is added. Bombs and pylons are provided in the kit, though they are not used for this boxing so they will make a handy addition to the spares box. Decals As seems to be the case with the Weekend editions you get two decal options with the kit. Both are for aircraft which took part in the 1949 Cooper Air Race. RW393, No.601 Sqn RAuxAF (Overall silver) SL718, No.612 Sqn RAuxAF (Camo) Conclusion It is good to see this excellent kit released on a Weekend Boxing. Highly recommended. Review samples courtesy of
  19. P-400 Air A Cutie 1:48 Eduard Weekend Edition The P-39 was developed to meet a proposal in 1937 for a single engine high altitude interceptor having the tactical mission of interception and attack of hostile aircraft at high altitude. Specifications called for a level airspeed of 360mph at altitude, and a climb to 20,000 feet in under 6 minutes. Armament was to be heavy including a cannon, the engine was to be liquid cooled, and the aircraft was to feature a tricycle undercarriage. Bell had previously designed the YFM-1 Aracuda featuring a mid-fuselage mounted engine to free up space for a large calibre 37mm cannon which would fire through the propeller hub. This was unusual as fighters were normally designed around an engine, not a weapons system. The Bell XP-39 would make its maiden flight in April of 1938 reaching 20000 feet in 5 minutes and maintain 390 mph. However it was found that top speed at 20000 feet was lower than the original proposed 400 mph. Bell would change the aircraft configuration for production to remove the turbo charger so production aircraft were only fitted with a single-stage, single-speed supercharger. Its been argued that Bell did this to save money, though its been said that testing showed aerodynamic issues with it. As a result production aircraft performance declined above 12000 feet and it was never able to serve as a medium level let alone high level aircraft. The RAF ordered the aircraft based on the XP-39 specifications however limitations of the "new" aircraft became apparent, and despite modifications it never was deemed acceptable. Only one Squadron No. 601 would use the aircraft operationally. All UK based aircraft would be sent to Russia, along with aircraft being built under contract in the US. In contrast to the UK, the USSR appreciated the P-39, although they would use it primarily in the ground attack role. The tactical environment of the Eastern front suited a low speed, low altitude aircraft much better. As well as in ground attack the USSR developed successful group aerial fighting tactics for the aircraft. 5 out of the 10 high scoring Soviet aces scored a majority of kills flying P-39's. Contrary to popular myth the Soviets did not use the aircraft for Tank Busting as the US did not supply any armour piercing rounds for the aircraft. The US requisitioned 200 aircraft from an order based for the UK, they called these aircraft the P-400 as they were advertised with a top speed to 400mph. Following the attack on Pearl Harbour these aircraft were deployed to the South West Pacific. Despite being out classed by Japanese aircraft the aircraft excelled in the ground attack. Pilots would fight Zeros and the aircraft were fairly even in the low level environment. By the end of 1942 over 80 Japanese aircraft were credited. These aircraft would go onto fly from Aleutian Islands, and serve in the Panama Canal Zone. The 81st & 350th Fighter Groups would fly in the Mediterranean TO but mainly on maritime patrol missions. Later the 81st would transfer to the Burma TO. The Kit The Eduard Cobra kit has been with us for a while now but it is still up to their excellent standards. It is being re-issued here in a dual combo boxing with added photo etch and resin parts. The kit comes on 3 sprues each of olive drab plastic, and a clear sprue. Construction starts shockingly enough with the cockpit area. The prominent radio area behind the cockpit is the first area to be built up, and the radios installed. The bulkhead behind the pilots seat is then installed. The seat is then installed along with the instrument panel. The front gear well is attached to the front of the cockpit along with the propeller shaft. Weight is indicated to be needed in this area due to the tricycle undercarriage, however there is no indication of exactly how much is recommended! Once the cockpit/wheel well assembly is completed it can added to the fuselage, and the two parts closed up around it. Construction then moves onto the main wing. This is of a conventional single part lower with to which top left & right wings are added. The insides of the main wheel wells are added along with the oil coolers which are in the wing leading edge. The right inserts will need to be added depending on the armament of your chosen option. If the modeller is going to add underwing tanks or bombs, then the holes will need to be opened up at this point. Once the wings are completed they can be added to the main fuselage along with the tail planes. The last job on the wings is to complete the underside cooling vents. Construction then moves to the main landing gear. As mentioned at the start of the review two sets of brassin wheels are included in the kit. Once the wheels have been added to the model along with the multipart main gear doors and their actuators. Once the main wheels are completed the nose gear can also be constructed. The nose wheel and its gear doors are also added. If bombs or fuel tanks are to be fitted (and the modeller remembered to open up the locating holes before!) then these can be added at this point. The main canopy is then added (full canopy masks being provided) along with the engine exhausts and cockpit side doors. The final touches are to add the pitot probe, wing guns, and lastly to assemble the propeller. Different bosses are provided for the different armament options. Decals As seems to be the norm with their weekend kits these days two decal options are provided. P-400 AP287 "AIR A CUTIE" 36th FS, 8 FG, New Guinea, Nov 1943. P-400 91st FS / 81st FG, Tunisia, Feb 1942. Conclusion The Eduard Cobra has been a round for a while now and its good to see it has been released in a Weekend boxing. It is also good to see that the slightly forgotten use of these aircraft in the New Guimea and Mediterranean TO's are getting some attention. Some people might be offended by the nose art, but its what the aircraft flew with. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  20. Dassault Mirage IIIC 1:48 Eduard - Weekend Edition Sacré bleu! If you have not heard of the Mirage IIIC where have you been? The Mirage III is one of the most recognisable aircraft to emerge from the Dassault Aviation stable in post war France. The Mirage III grew out of French government studies for a light weight all weather interceptor able to reach 18,000 meter in altitude in Six minutes and able to reach mach 1.3 in level flight. The tail less delta combined the wing with an area ruled fuselage to achieve its speed. The Mirage IIIC would remain in French service from 1961 until 1988. Export order would be received from Israel, Argentina, South Africa, Pakistan, and Lebanon. The Israeli Mirage IIICs performed very well against the MiGs of Egypt, Jordan and Syria. In addition Pakistani aircraft performed well in the 1971 war with India. The Kit The Eduard Mirage IIIC has now been with us since 2004 and it is still a great tool of this famous aircraft. Eduard have released it in various boxing over the years, the moulds still look as good as they did the first time around. In addition to the sprues with the fuselage halves, and the wings we get six additional sprues of parts, and one clear sprue. For a weekend edition the modeller is getting a lot of plastic here, and a decent set of underwing stores. Two types of fuel tanks, Sidewinders, Matra 530 missiles, Matra ATM-9D missiles, and rocket pods are provided. Construction starts in the cockpit area (quelle surprise!). It is quite something how many parts there are here and how much detail Eduard have packed in. The ejection seat is made up first and this consists of 6 parts including ejection seat firing handles. The cockpit tub is then built up, this consists of 18 parts! the instrument panel and side panels are provided as decals if the modeller does not wish to paint them. Next up on the construction list is the jet pipe, this has eight parts on its own. Once built this and the cockpit can be sandwiched between the main fuselage halves and the intake bullets added to the exterior. The next area for attention are the main wheel wells. These are built up from six parts each and attached to the inside of the lower main wing. At this time the modeller will need to open up the appropriate holes in the wing for the externals tanks/ordnance chosen. Before the lower wing can be attached to the main fuselage the intake are behind the cockpit needs to be installed. Once this is done the upper main wings can be attached. **Note here that due to the flap attachment area Eduard advise no glue is used here at all** Once the main wing is complete it can be attached to the fuselage. Now the main parts are together the intakes can be completed. Next up the modeller needs to select the right underwing pylons for the load being used. The cannon barrels are installed under the intakes at this stage, and on the wing the three part pose able flaps can be installed. The next stage is the construction of the landing gear. Again Eduard seem to have gone to town with the parts count, but this should provide a good looking gear. The front gear is moulded in with its retraction strut so it should be a more stable join than most. The front wheel is attached with a locking part holding it in. One the front gear is in the gear doors and separate retraction strut can be added. The main wheels are of standard two part construction and attach to a one part gear leg. These are installed to the wheel wells and their retraction struts added. The inner and out gear doors are then attached with their appropriate retraction struts. To finish off Eduard provide the modeller with both a pilot figure and boarding ladder if the mopddel wants to use them. The modeller can then add the canopies and choice of underwing stores. Decals With what now seems to be standard there are two decal options in the Weekend boxing. The decals are printed by Eduard, look in register, are glossy and colour dense. The two options are; Mirage IIIC, No. 92, EC 02/010, Seine, Armée de ľ Air, BA 120 Cazaux, April 1976 Mirage IIIC, No. 87, EC 03/010 Vexin, Détachement Air 188, Armée de ľ Air, Djibouti, October 1984 Conclusion This is a great kit from Eduard, and it is good to see it re-released in a weekend edition. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  21. MiG-15 UTI 1:72 Eduard - Weekend Edition The Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15 was one of the most famous fighter from the early Cold War period. Although a Soviet design, the MiG-15 famously made use of captured German research on the aerodynamic properties of swept wings, and was powered by a reverse-engineered Rolls Royce Nene turbojet. The resulting aircraft was a triumph, easily outclassing straight wing jet fighters when in the hands of an experienced pilot. In order to ensure it could fulfil its intended role as a bomber destroyer, it packed a formidable punch in the shape of two 23mm cannons and a single 37mm cannon mounted in a pack under the nose. The MiG-15bis was the second major variant. It featured a range of small improvements, including an improved engine, revised arrangement for the 23mm cannon, redesigned airbrakes and, in some models, underwing hardpoints for unguided rockets or bombs. The MiG-15 made its combat début during the Korean War, where it proved a nasty shock for UN forces. It wasn't until the North American F-86 Sabre became available that the American forces had anything able to hold its own against the new Soviet fighter. The MiG-15 went on to become one of the most widely produced jet fighters in history and saw service with air forces around the world. The UTI is the dual seat trainer version of the MiG-15. The Kit Despite a lengthy delay caused by a problem with the mould which necessitated the re-tooling of the whole kit, Eduard's MiG-15 was warmly received when it was released last year. When it did finally emerge, it helped to cement Eduard's reputation for producing high-quality models which feature exquisite detail and superb engineering. Thanks to the way the kit has been engineered, all of the parts for the UTI version are provided on three new sprues, two grey and one clear; with sprue holding the flying surfaces carried over from the previous releases. Construction starts with the cockpit (shock!). The ejection seats are made up from two parts each with the seat belts being supplied as decals. Once these are complete they are added to the cockpit floor along with the front, middle, and rear bulkheads. The instrument panels are added to the front and middle panels, with the instruments being supplied as decals. The cockpit sidewalls also form the inside of the intake which curves around the cockpit. Decal again being used for the panels here. The front wheel well is added at the front of the cockpit at this point also. The instructions indicate nose weight to be added here as well. The rear jet pipe is built up, and when done this and the completed cockpit assembly can be sandwiched between the main fuselage halves. The rudder is then added. The main wings (conventional upper and lower construction) are then added, along with the one piece tailplanes. Next on the construction list the nose ring and intake parts are added to the front of the complete fuselage. The front wheel is added and the front gear bay doors are also attached. Panels are then added to the underside of the nose along with the cannon pod. Next up the main wheels are built up and added. Two different styles of hubs are provided with no indication of which to be used for either marking option (the modeller will need to check their references here). The wheels and outer gear doors both attach to the main gear legs. The inner gear door and the main retraction strut then need to be attached. The canopy is the next area to get attention. This is a four part affair which can be posed open or closed. As it is a bit complicated a one part closed canopy would have been a nice option to keep everything lined up, but it is not. You have the front screen, front canopy, middle pat, and lastly the rear canopy. Some of these parts are small and I can see problems getting it all lined up. Lastly to finish of the model the under wing fuel tanks and wing mounted pitot tube are added. Two different styles of wing tanks are included, but again there is no reference as to which to use, so the modeller is back to their references. Decals As with all Weekend releases it seems now Eduard supply two decal options; Iraqi Air Force, 1980 (as per box art) USSR as flown by Yuri Gagarin / Vladimir Seryogin 1968 In addition to the national markings a separate sheet of stencil decals is provided. Conclusion This is a great kit from Eduard and it is good to see it in the Weekend boxing. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  22. 10% Off All Weekend

    This weekend get another 10% Off across everything.
  23. Weekend Offer

    Well atlast the weekend is nearly here...... Enjoy it while the sun stay's out..
  24. Avia B.534 IV Série - Weekend Edition 1:72 Eduard Avia first flew a prototype single engine fighter biplane designated the B-34 in 1932. The first prototype was powered by a Hispano-Suiza 12N V12 engine. A second prototype the B-34/2 was flown with an Avia Rr29 radial engine, however this had overheating and vibration problems. This aircraft was then re-engine with a Hispano-Suiza 12Ybrs V12 engine. This second prototype was re-designated the B-534/1 in Spetember of 1933. In April 1934 this aircraft gained the Czechoslovak national speed record of 227.2mph. An order for 34 aircraft followed, which was increased to 147. At this time the aircraft was ahead of other countries with contemporary's such as the Gloster Gladiator and Curtis P-36 only being flown as prototypes or just entering production. The later IV series would feature an all metal propeller, a tail wheel, and enclosed cockpit. The aircraft was developed this far as the Air Force was reluctant to abandon the climb rate and manoeuvrability of bi-planes over the new monoplanes. The partition of Czechoslovakia meant that the B.534 never actually saw combat in the defence of the country. Slovakia was declared independent and their Air Force reformed using the B.534 but weakened as there were no Czech pilots. When Hungary invaded in 1939 two aircraft were lost to AAA fire and four more to fighters. Slovakian B.534s were further used during the invasion of Poland escorting German Ju 87 bombers. These same aircraft later served with the Germans in the Ukraine in summer 1941, and returned in 1943 for anti-partisan duties. The last recorded use of the B.534 would be Slovak National uprising in 1944. One aircraft downed a Hungarian Ju 52, this being the last recorded victory for a biplane. In addition to the Czech/Slovak use Bulgaria purchased 78 aircraft in 1939. These were used in a variety of combat roles including intercepting USAAF B-24 aircraft on the Ploiesti raid. No B-24 losses were attributed to B.534s but some of these aircraft did receive damage from the B-24s. After Bulgaria switched sides in 1944 B.534s were used to attack German troops. Some aircraft even engaged in combat with German 109s but due to the low altitude and the B.534s manoeuvrability combat was broken off, though one B.534 was shot down. The Kit The kit arrives on three sprues of grey plastic and one of clear plastic. The parts are well made with fine panel lines were needed, and realistic fabric effects. Unusually for Eduard a few parts are off the sprue (perhaps the kit had a rough journey from The Czech Republic!). Construction starts shockingly not in the cockpit but the lower radiator. The front and back parts are built up, with a decal provided for the rear face. Once the front and rear faces of the radiator are in construction can then move to the cockpit area. Internal framework parts are placed in both fuselage halves, along with other detail parts. The instrument panel is added (A decal provides the instruments). The pilots seat is made up, and along with the control column these are added to the cockpit floor. The floor has rudder pedals moulded in. Once complete the floor and instrument panel are added into the fuselage, and along with a rear deck parts these are sandwiched inside the two fuselage halves. Once the main fuselage is complete the top engine cover is then added. Next to go on are the tail parts. Each tail plane is a two part affair (front & rear) so they are fully positionable. The vertical tail is added along with a separate positional rudder. Once the tail is complete the construction moves onto the wings. A one part upper wing is supplied along with left & right lowers. The lower wings are added first and the kit gives a diagram to ensure the correct dihedral is obtained. The upper wing is attached by 2 sets of interplane struts joining the lower wing, and two sets of struts joining the fuselage. The finishing touched are to add the landing gear, propeller, underwing bombs (if needed) and the canopy. Rigging diagrams are provided if the modeller wishes to rig the finished model. Canopy The clear parts arrive on a circular clear sprue those familiar to Eduard kits will recognise. There is a one part canopy and three part canopy, this gives the modeller a choice to use an open or closed canopy. Other canopies not for use with this model are also included. The canopies are clear and free from distortion. Decals A smallish main decal sheet is supplied, along with a correction sheet. The decals appear in register, and are colour dense. Two options are supplied; Air Regiments No.4, 40th Flight, Prague (Kbley) April 1938 Dogan No.31, 2/2 Orlyak, Vrazhdebna airfield, Bulgaria, November 1944 Conclusion This is an excellent kit of an important Czechoslovak aircraft. Credit to Eduard for the one. In its weekend edition with two decal options this kit is great value for money.Highly recommended. Review samples courtesy of
  25. MiG-21PF - Weekend Edition 1:48 Eduard My collogue has reviewed this kit before in its Profipak edition here. This is the same great plastic from Eduard but it is now released in a Weekend Edition. This does not have the photo etch parts and decal options of the Profipak. The difference here with the weekend edition is that a set of Eduard's Super fabric seatbelts are supplied, as well as two decal options. These are printed by Eduard and feature one small sheet of national markings & Bort numbers; and one larger sheet with extensive stencilling. The two aircraft options are; Red 40, USSR featuring Czechoslovak invasion markings, 1968. RED 851, German Democratic Republic 1965. Conclusion After the Profipak edition its good to see this kit released as a Weekend Edition for those of us who dont use all the additional bits, or for those modellers on a budget. Recommended. Review samples courtesy of
×