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Found 7 results

  1. So you want to buy a car?

    Yes indeed I do, it a Skoda Karoq Edition 1.5 TSI DG with a few goodies and I'll happily pay the £30,930 list less any discount because it's a cracking car, I know , I had a loaner from Hertz whose building we share. And like a diligent car buyer, I did my research: I drove and specced: A Nissan Qashqai (aka "Kumquat" c/o Jeremy Clarkson)- Plain horrible and expensive A Seat Ateca- Basically the same as the Karoq but with rock hard suspension and fewer goodies, weird gear ratios as well for motorway cruising A VW Tiguan- car on which the Karoq & Ateca are based, very nice, cost £5000 more than Karoq with the same spec! So today i was going to test drive the exact spec Karoq at the local dealer in Reading, negotiate a price as I'm a cash buyer with no part exchange, had booked the test drive 3 weeks ago, got my license code etc, , I even had transferred £5000 into my current account for the deposit so I could pay it on the spot and cleared it in advance from my bank for the unusual transaction. So what could possibly go wrong? (08:30) " Hi its Mr Azureglo, confirming my test drive and appointment with Nick at 11:00" " Ah its Ken here, Nicks off sick . No-one called azureglo is booked on any test drives today, but can I check your number and call back right away?" " Sure thing Ken speak later" 09:30 "Hi is that Skoda Newbury, I'd like to book a Saturday test drive for a Karoq Edition TSI DSG which your Reading branch has but isnt terribly keen to let me near" " Hi Mr Azureglo, I'm sorry about that, unfortunately they probably wont let me have it for any Saturdays as its the only one in the group" " OK, so have I done something to offend your company? I mean is just asking to buy car from you and test drive it first some form of Ancient Order Of Vehicular Dealers Tribal insult I was unaware of?" " Sir there is no need to be sarcastic, I'll try and help but I feel you are blaming me for something thats not my fault" " OK, I'm glad to see that your company teaches its staff to take responsibility: So its not your fault and you'll try and get from the recluses at Reading but there's no guarantee?" " Again sir, I think you're being sarcastic and unfair" " Really, thats good to know, you try and sort out this test drive on Monday and we'll see how we go" 10:30 " Hello is that Skoda Reading? I'd like to know why this Ken didn't return my call as promised 2 hours ago? " Hello , I'm Eric the sales manager and Kens busy on a test drive, I think you are being very aggressive and you should know I'm short staffed due to sickness and redundancy and dont appreciate your tone" " Really, my tone is not something thing you don't appreciate, perhaps your dismal customer service and my failure to appreciate it may be the issue? In any case I've re-booked this with Skoda Newbury ,in the vain hope they could not possibly care less about customers than you" "Listen, I'm a grown man and wont wont be talked to like that, I'll tell you Eric's Theory about Perception and Reality" ( he actually said this exact sentence!!!) " Before you do, I have a masters in Cognitive Psychology and am over 50 so I think I win on both counts" " Mr Azureglo, I dont want to have this conversation any more, you can to Newbury , go to my directors or any other Skoda dealer but i am going to end this conversation" " Have a nice day in that case" " I will do" Now I'm exchanging emails with their group brand Director via Linked In and he's a bit worried about all of this, including a threat to record my conversation without my permission ( a criminal offence in the UK) as well as explaining I'm a customer experience architect at O2 Telefonica and this dealer has given me the best example of really bad customer experience. And for the final bit of Karma in three weeks one of the guests at my next public seminar on "multi channel customer experience" is a senior director of retail for VAG, Skoda's parent company. Even for atheists, it appears there is a god. Apart from the sheer waste of time, wasn't buying a new car supposed to be a fun and exciting experience,..not if you want a top of the line Skoda SUV in Reading it seems. Cheers A
  2. My first Diorama, Rally Erechim 2015, Skoda Fabia S2000, driver: Gustavo Saba. Ps: don't have the crew inside the car yet.
  3. Skoda Fabia S2000 - Rally Sulamericano Erechim 2015 - Brasil Drivers: Gustavo Saba (Paraguai)/D. Cagnotti (Argentina)
  4. Skoda 305mm Siege Howitzer CMK 1:35 History The Škoda 30.5 cm Mörser M.11 was a siege howitzer produced by Škoda Works and used by the Austro-Hungarian Army during World War I and by Nazi Germany in World War II. Development began in 1906, when a development contract was placed by the Austro-Hungarian high command with Skoda-Werke in Pilsen to develop a weapon capable of penetrating the concrete fortresses being built in Belgium and Italy. Development work continued until 1909, when the first prototype was finished and, in 1910, fired secretly in Hungary. The weapon was able to penetrate 2 m (6 ft 7 in) of reinforced concrete with its special armour-piercing shell, which weighed 384 kg (847 lb). There were a few technical problems with the first piece, but, after few reconstructions in 1911, the upgraded piece made another round of testing in Felixdorf and in the mountains of Tyrol. After that, Moritz von Auffenberg, the Minister of War, placed an order for 24 of the new weapons The weapon was transported in three sections by a 100-horsepower 15 ton Austro-Daimler road tractor M. 12. It broke down into barrel, carriage and firing platform loads, each of which had its own trailer. It could be assembled and readied to fire in around 50 minutes. The mortar could fire two types of shell, a heavy armour-piercing shell with a delayed action fuse weighing 384 kg, and a lighter 287 kg shell fitted with an impact fuze. The light shell was capable of creating a crater 8 meters wide and 8 meters deep, as well as killing exposed infantry up to 400 m (440 yd) away. The weapon required a crew of 15–17, and could fire 10 to 12 rounds an hour. After firing, it automatically returned to the horizontal loading position. In 1916, the M. 11 design was upgraded and the new M.11/16 was produced - the difference was mainly that the firing platform had been modified to allow for a traverse of 360 degrees. Also in 1916, a new model was released, the M.16, which had longer barrel (L/12) and longer range 12,300 metres (13,500 yd) The Model The kit comes in quite a small, yet deep box with a rendering of the mortar on the front. Inside it is packed with resin parts in a number of poly bags. According to the instruction leaflet there are one hundred and six parts moulded in a greeny grey resin, with the exception of one part which is moulded in dark grey resin. The way they have been moulded onto the blocks you will need to take great care in cutting them off and there will be quite a bit of cleaning up required. The parts are well produced with some great detail including the big bolt heads found on weapons of this era. Read the instructions carefully as there are alternative parts depending on whether you build an early or late version. Construction begins with the very sturdy base unit, onto which the towing beams, forward mounted box top which is fitted with a pair of large brackets onto which four eyebolts are attached. The large turntable is slotted into the base recess and the shell chute base attached to the rear of the base. The build then moves onto the mortar itself with the assembly of the two small recuperators glued to the underside of the trunnion cradle, onto which the two trunnion gears are affixed. The elevation gears are glued to their shaft and the tow assemblies put to one side. The two large recuperators, made up form eight parts are built up, followed by the trunnion section of the barrel. This is fitted with a variety of longitudinal and cross beams top and bottom, an eye plate and four large bolt heads. The middle section, either bolted or smooth is then attached to the trunnion section, followed by the muzzle section, and the optional muzzle cap. The breech section is built up from four parts and can be positioned either open or closed, and finished off with the rear mounted breech plate and recuperator end fittings. The large and small recuperators are then attached to the rear of the barrel section, followed by the breech section. The two impressively moulded trunnion mounts are detailed with a selection of small parts before being fitted to each side of the barrel. Between the mounts the elevation cog assembly is also fitted and closed off with a curved front plate. The barrel/mounting is then fitted to the turntable on the base. The mortar is fitted with a small splinter shield which comes in two parts whilst the main elevation wheel is made up from nine parts. The seven piece training unit is also assembled at this point, whilst the mounting points of it and the “range computer”, and sights are fitted to the left side trunnion mount followed by the units themselves. The complex shell handling system is assembled from seventeen parts, and if done so carefully, should be able to move, allowing the shell, included, to be positioned at any point in the loading process. This assembly is then glued to the rear of the mounting, followed by two rails onto which the shell trolley can run to move the shell onto the loading cradle. The trolley is provided and is made up from eight parts and once assembled can be fitted to the rails finishing the build. Conclusion There have been a few big mortars released in the last year or so, but injection moulded, so it interesting to see CMK release this one. Not that it’s not welcome and is in fact more detailed than the similar marque of weapon released by Takom. Certainly not one for the novice, it will make a superb addition to any collection of big guns. Very highly recommended. Review samples courtesy of
  5. Kora Models has just released a 1/72nd Fieseler-Skoda FiSk.199 (AZmodel Bf.109G-2/4/R-1 Jabo) - ref.72018 AZmodel kit with resin Accessories and decals for creating the FiSk199 Source:https://www.lfmodels.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=2350&zenid=56lk5f17ssm86s4aj36k7tvfi2 Box art V.P.
  6. Skoda Turtle - new from Takom

    Just seen this listed as an upcoming release from Takom There's already a resin one available from CMK but it'll be nice to get it in styrene. The Czech camo looks like it will be 'fun' to paint Andy
  7. Skoda 305mm Siege Howitzer Takom 1:35 History Development began in 1906, when a development contract was placed by the Austro-Hungarian high command with Skoda-Werke in Pilsen to develop a weapon capable of penetrating the concrete fortresses being built in Belgium and Italy. Development work continued until 1909, when the first prototype was finished and, in 1910, fired secretly in Hungary. The weapon was able to penetrate 2 m (6 ft 7 in) of reinforced concrete with its special armour piercing shell, which weighed 384 kg (847 lb). There were a few technical problems with the first piece, but, after few reconstructions in 1911, the upgraded piece made another round of testing in Felixdorf and in the mountains of Tyrol. After that, Moritz von Auffenberg, the Minister of War, placed an order for 24 of the new weapons. The mortar could fire two types of shell, a heavy armour-piercing shell with a delayed action fuse weighing 384 kg, and a lighter 287 kg shell fitted with an impact fuse. The light shell was capable of creating a crater 8 meters wide and 8 meters deep, as well as killing exposed infantry up to 400 m (440 yd) away. The mortar required a crew of 15 to 17, and could fire between 10 to 12 rounds an hour. After firing, it automatically returned to the horizontal loading position. In 1916, the M. 11 design was upgraded and the new M. 11/16 was produced - the difference was mainly that the firing platform had been modified to allow for a traverse of 360 degrees. Also in 1916, a new model was released, the M. 16, which had longer barrel (L/12) and longer range 12,300 metres (13,500 yd). Eight Mörsers were loaned to the German Army and they were first fired in action on the Western Front at the start of World War I. They were used in concert with the Krupp 42 cm howitzer ("Big Bertha") to destroy the rings of Belgian fortresses around Liege (Battle of Liège), Namur (Fortified Position of Namur) and Antwerp (Forts Koningshooikt, Kessel and Broechem). While the weapon was used on the Eastern, Italian and Serbian fronts until the end of the war, it was only used on the Western front at the beginning of the war. In 1915, ten howitzers were used in support of the Austro-Hungarian-German invasion of Serbia under the German General August von Mackensen. By the end of the war, 79 of the weapons of all three types were in service. Only 24 were destroyed. Between the two world wars, large numbers of mortars were in service in Yugoslavia (4 M.11 and 6 M.16), Romania, Italy (23 M.11, 16 M.11/16 and 16 M.16), Czechoslovakia (17 M.16) and Hungary (3 M.11 and 2 M.16). There were only two in Austria; one in the Arsenal, Army Museum in Vienna, the second as a training weapon in Innsbruck. In 1939, Germany seized all 17 pieces from Czechoslovakia and repaired the howitzer from the Arsenal Museum, designating them 30.5 cm Mörser (t). In 1941, they obtained five more weapons after the defeat of Yugoslavia and placed them into service as the 30.5 cm Mörser 638(j). They saw service against Poland, France and the Soviet Union in World War II, where they served with Heavy Artillery Battalions (schwere Artillerie-Abteilungen) 624, 641 and 815 as well as two Heavy Static Artillery Batteries (schwere Artillerie-Batterie bodenstandig) 230 and 779. The barrel was either monobloc or built-up. Some sources indicate that a third type - with loose liner - also existed. To soften recoil, a large slotted muzzle brake was fitted. The breechblock was of interrupted screw type, with forced extraction of cartridge during opening. A safety lock prevented opening of the breechblock before the shot; if there was a need to remove a shell, the lock had to be disabled. To assist loading when the barrel was set to high elevation angle, the breach was equipped with cartridge holding mechanism. The gun was fired by pulling a trigger cord. The Model This kit depicts a Skoda 30.5cm M.1916 as it was used in the siege of Sevastapol in 1942, but since information is sketchy I wouldnt have thought there would have been many changes since they were built in 1916. Contained in the top opening box, with a stylised photograph of the weapon being inspected on the front, are three sprues of sandy coloured styrene. The parts contained on the sprues are free of flash, moulding pips or other imperfections, and the moulded detail appears to be very good indeed. What ejection pin marks there are seem to be kept to be on inside of parts so there isnt much in the way of cleaning up once off the sprues. Takom have used slide mould technology very effectively in the production of the barrel parts allowing for a seamless build. Although there was a carriage designed for the guns, as seen on many of the museum exhibits, this unit is built as one with a fixed base, included in the kit. The build begins with the assembly of the breech block and the rear barrel block, which are then fitted to the trunnion block. The three parts to the barrel slide into each other like a telescope, with the completed unit slide into the trunnion block. The sliding breech is fitted with the release handle and pull handle before being slid into the breech block. The recupertor unit is assembled from upper and lower parts to which the front and rear parts are added, along with what looks like a valve at the front, the completed assembly is then fitted to the underside of the barrel assembly. The two ratchet arcs are also attached to the underside of the barrel and fitted with a spreader bar in between the two parts. The base is made up of a box with individual sides and the top, onto which the traversing ring is fitted. The right hand trunnion mount is fitted with an elevation axle mount, with associated support bracket and an additional strengthening beam. The mount is then attached to the traversing table. Before the left side is fitted the elevation wheel is attached to its support, whilst the hydraulic section of the elevation mechanism is assembled from five parts and the mechanical elevation guide is assembled from four parts. The two elevation ratchet wheels now assembled from two wheels and an axle. The ratchet wheels are then fitted with poly caps to allow the modeller to elevate the gun to their desired position. Each of these assemblies are then fitted to the trunnion mount, which is then fitted to the traversing mount with the elevation wheels and barrel assembly sandwiched between the two trunnions. Protective plates are fitted with ancillary parts before being attached to the front and rear of the trunnion plates. Lastly, the loading chute is assembled from seven parts and fitted to the rear of the gun mount completing the main part of the build. In addition to the gun and its mounting Takom have also included three shells, two long, (AP shells), and a shorter one which I presume is an HE shell, each assembled from two halves. One of the AP shells is fitted with a collar which is used to attach it to the shell handling trolley, also included and made up of eight parts. There is also a shell box to which a separate lid is affixed, allowing one of the three shells to be visible. All very useful if the model is to be built into a diorama. Conclusion This is a very unusual and quite obscure subject, yet still very welcome.I do have a fascination large calibre weapons, but have only seen ones the Germans designed in WW2, so its nice to have the chance to build something a little different and with the option of setting it into either a WW1 or WW2 scene. It would have been even nicer had Takom included a crew for it, so hopefully they will release a set in the future. Highly recommended Review sample courtesy of
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