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Found 12 results

  1. F4U-1 Propeller 1:32 Eduard Brassin - For Tamiya Kit Propeller (632110) This is a new prop unit. The blades are individual and seat into the top of the hub via a provided jig. When this is removed from the pour block the modeller will have to drill a locating hole in it. Review samples courtesy of
  2. Spitfire propellers from Ultracast

    There are many threads and questions about Spitfire propellers and which should be fitted to what mark etc. There are some great references here on Britmodeller already. This post is intended to publicise the different propellers and spinners available for Spitfires in 1/48 scale from Ultracast. All info from Ultracast's own site: Weybridge 2-blade propeller - Ultracast 48197 This propeller was installed on the first production Spitfires (K9787 to K9863) De Havilland 3-blade propeller and spinner - Ultracast 48112 This is the prop & spinner mostly commonly associated with the Mk I Spitfire, however this blade was also used on many Mk II's and Mk V's. Rotol 3-blade propeller and blunt spinner (includes blister for Coffman starter on Mk.II Spits) - Ultracast 48113 This is the prop & spinner most commonly associated with the Mk II Spitfire. This combination was also used on some Mk V's. Check your reference photos for correct prop & spinner. Rotol 3-blade metal propeller and spinner - Ultracast 48114 This prop & spinner is seen on many Mediterranean and Pacific theatre Spitfire Mk V's. Check your reference photos for correct prop & spinner. Many photos of this combination can be found on the Australian War Memorial website, including photos of Clive Caldwell standing in front of a Spitfire Mk V using these blades. Another very interesting photo can be found on Page 143 of Wings of Fame Vol. 18. This photo shows two Spitfire Mk V's undergoing service on Malta, one Spitfire has the early De Havilland blades, the other has these wider Rotols. Rotol 3-blade wooden propeller and long spinner - Ultracast 48115 This is the prop & spinner most commonly associated with the Mk V Spitfire. This set contains accurately profiled blades and a detailed spinner. Mk.IX 4-blade propeller and spinner - Ultracast 48260 Standard fare for Mk.VIII, IX and XVI Spitfires - this set contains more accurately shaped propeller blade tips, and provides missing rivet detail from the otherwise lovely new Eduard kits.
  3. This is my tutorial on how to get a good weathered finish on the nose cap of a model plane. There will be no pictures sadly because I don't know how to get them from my phone to the forum. This is intended for beginners and people who need or want to finish a model faster. 1. Start with a black base coat. Just paint the nose cap black, and make sure the whole cap is painted the color. 2. Get any color you want or the one assigned in the painting instructions and paint the color from the top of the nose to the bottom. One or two coats is the best for this, because you still want to keep the weathered finish on it. And Voila! You have an easily weathered nose cap! This is probably my only tutorial, as I discovered this accidently and wanted to show it with other modelers. Don't say hate comments to me saying this was unneeded, as I am only 13 and I'm not as good a modeler as adults. And don't say any hate comments to other people, because that's just plain rude.
  4. source: http://modelforum.cz/viewtopic.php?f=97&t=77712&start=720#p1880503 "Dalšími v pořadí nejbližšími rozpracovanými projekty (ono je toho docela hodně) je moderní dvoumotorák s vrtulemi a druhoválečná stíhačka." next project is a twin-engine modern aircraft with propellers And next is WW2 fighter http://modelforum.cz/viewtopic.php?f=97&t=77712&start=735#p1880919 "ne, nebude to Turbolet, lítá to nebo lítalo na západ od nás (a na jih, sever a možná i na východ)" No, not L-410 Turbolet. It flies or flew to the west of Czech Republic (and to the south, north and maybe to the east) type is still secret
  5. Hello everybody, just another question that came across my mind recently: what are the reasons behind the different developments of propellers on German and British fighters in WWII? Both the Spitfire and the Bf-109 started their career with a two-bladed fixed-pitch wooden airscrew. On both aircraft, these were quickly replaced by two-bladed, then three-bladed variable-pitch propellers. With ever increasing engine power the Spitfire soon used four propeller blades (Mk. IX onwards), five blades (Mk. XIV) and eventually even a contra-rotating prop with 2x3 blades (some Mk. 21 and the last Seafires). By contrast, even the last Bf-109 K in 1945 used only three blades. The German airscrews changed in terms of increased chord and area but always remained three-bladed. This is even true for later and larger fighters, the Fw-190, Ta-152 and Do-335. I suppose that three-blade airscrews are less labor-intense and cheaper to produce than those with four or five (let alone contra-rotating designs), but somehow the propeller has to match the increasing engine output. With the rpm limited (the propeller tips shouldn’t get supersonic) and the diameter limited (problem of striking the ground), the chord/area and the number of blades seem to be only adjustable parameters. Therefore, it’s funny that the two countries followed different paths. Any ideas?
  6. Focke Wulf 190F-8 Propeller 1:32 Brassin (632 069) Although the general feeling is that the Revell 1:32 Focke Wulf 190F-8 is pretty well detailed straight from the box, it seems Eduards intent to replace almost every bit of detail other than the main fuselage and wing components. With this in mind they have just released a replacement propeller set. The set comes in the hard blister pack that Eduard/Brassin parts are usually found. On opening there is a small etched template under a card backing, three dark grey resin propeller blades and four light grey resin parts, protected by foam inserts. The propeller boss and cooling fan need to be carefully removed from their moulding blocks and cleaned. The tangs on the brass template are then folded to 90 degrees which are slipped over the boss back plate so that the shaft hole can be accurately drilled out. The set includes a jig so that the propeller blades can be fitted to the boss at the correct angle. The spinner also needs to be carefully removed from its moulding block, and for some strange reason Eduard have made this so that the pour stubs are on the out surface of the spinner. This makes for quite a bit of careful sanding and polishing to get a really good smooth surface. With the blades attached to the boss, the spinner can be added along with the cooling fan and the whole assembly slipped onto the kits propeller shaft. Conclusion Although the new Revell kit has superb detail straight out of the box some modellers are just not content. This is a very nice set that is slightly marred by the way the spinner has been moulded, but hey, this is modelling, right? Once assembled the propeller will look superb. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  7. Propeller Blades

    I have notice that it seems fashionable to weather blades by chipping the paint and shoing silver along the edges. I always thought the following: Spitfire and Hurricane - wood with plastic strips on the edges painted black yellow tips Mossy and other RAF - Unsure but same as above German - Wood painted green or black Japanesse - wood painted black USA - early - wood painted silver in from and black facing pilot USA - late - unsure Anyone care to enlighten me Thanks Sean
  8. The first bunch of resin detail sets from Barracuda Studios has just landed. For the fans of the Spitfire, the 109 and other WW2 fighters like the He 219 and the Me 262. Wing correction sets, seats and wheels for the Spitfire, a cowling set for the big He 219 and wheels, bulges, cooleres and more for the Gustavs in 1/32 scale. The detail sets are mainly for the new Revell kits but will fit the Hasegawa and Trumpeter as well http://www.berndmm.de/en/brands/barracuda-cast/ Single items can be shipped worlfwide for 4,95€/ 3,65 GBP / $ 5,65 Thank you very much Bernd BerndM.Modellbau
  9. Greetings all, Does anyone know what type of propellers where used on the 'original' civil DC-3's equipped with Wright Cyclone R-1820 engines? Although I'm sure they are not correct, however to my eyes, the prop and spinner that comes with the 1/72 Matchbox Lysander look quite similar. I have posted a separate 'wants' post for a spare prop here if anyone has one - http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234966944-matchbox-172-lysander-prop-spinner-any-condition/ Failing that, does anyone know of any aftermarket props that are available in 1/72 scale. Cheers and thanks for looking.. Dave.
  10. P-51 Mustang Propeller blades Red Roo Models 1:32 There seems to many a variation in the style and shape of propeller blades used on the NA P-51 Mustang. Not all of them are supplied in the various kits currently released. Meaning it’s been the tasks of the modeller to either modify what’s been provided, or buy in aftermarket propellers. To this end, Red Roo Models have released three sets of propeller blades to give the modeller more options on which 1:32 scale P-51 variant they wish to build. Each set includes four individual resin blades for both NAA and CAC built aircraft. The blades are almost ready to use straight out of the packet with only a minimal amount of cleaning up required around the root of each blade. They appear really well moulded with fine leading/trailing edges and tips plus the right amount of twist on each blade. The sets provided for this review include:- CAC P-51 Mustang with HS “Cuffed” paddle blades (RRR32007 CAC P-51 Mustang with HS “Cuffless” chisel tip blades (RRR32008) NAA P-51 Mustang with Aeroproducts blades, (RRR32009 Conclusion This is the first set of Red Roo resin that I’ve been asked to review and I am really impressed with the fine mouldings that they’ve managed to achieve. That and the fact they can be used straight out of the packet without the fuss of removing them from moulding blocks makes them even more desirable. I had to check they were in fact made of resin as they looked like injected moulded styrene but with the extra finesse. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  11. Rotol Equipment for Spitfire Mk VII, VIII and IX plus (X, XI & XVI) Aircraft Pictured above as photographed by Royal Air Force (RAF), Official Photographer, Flying Officer (F/O) L H Baker is an unidentified 241 Squadron (Sqn), RAF Merlin 63 powered Spitfire FIX (probably MH653, RZ-U*), being serviced by Aircraftman (AC1) Jim Birkett of B Flight and Leading Aircraftman (LAC) Wally Passmore of Maintenance Flight at Canne, Vesuvius, Italy during 27 January 1944. It Appears to be fitted with an R.3/4F5/4 type propeller featuring Hydulignum blades with Rotoloid coverings and an Armoured sheath (secured by screws and rivets) with a 4CM/4 Rotol type spinner and GRF/4A governor unit. The following information drawn mostly from the 1950 "Publication No 504, Series 01, Repair & Service Manual, Rotol Equipment for Spitfire Mk VII, VIII & IX" details the various types of propellers and spinners that were fitted to Spitfire Mk VII, VIII, IX & XVI aircraft. Of particular interest to the aviation artist, modeller and or kit maker is a list that describes various propeller and spinner assemblies with their respective aircraft and engine combinations. Information on paint finishes and identification markings are also revealed, as is more importantly the use of both the Rotol Limited and Constant Speed Airscrews (CSA) Limited spinners. The before mentioned spinner types account for previously observed differences such as length between some surviving Merlin 60 series family powered Spitfire spinners. Please note that all of the text in green as shown below is quoted verbatim from the above mentioned Rotol Limited Repair & Service Manual. Rotol Equipment List Publication No 504 Series 01 Reference 7124 ROTOL EQUIPMENT FOR SPITFIRE MK VII, VIII & IX AIRCRAFT LIST OF EQUIPMENT The items of Rotol equipment used on the various Marks of Spit- fire aircraft are shown in tabular form below. Spitfire Mk. VII, VIII & IX. Merlin 61 engine PROPELLER SPINNER GOVERNOR UNIT R.3/4F5/2 4CM/2 GRF/4A R.3/4F5/3 4CM/2 GRF/4A R.3/4F5/4 4CM/4 GRF/4A Merlin 64 engine PROPELLER SPINNER GOVERNOR UNIT R.3/4F5/4 4CM/4 GRF/4A Spitfire L.F. Mk. VIII & IX. Merlin 66 engine PROPELLER SPINNER GOVERNOR UNIT R.3/4F5/4 4CM/4 CGR/1A x x For details of the CGR/1A Governor Unit apply to Rotol Limited. Propeller Descriptions PART 2 02 Sect: 1 Description Chap: 1 Detailed Description Appendix R3/4F5/2 PROPELLER R3/4F5/2 This propeller is similar to that described in the preceding Chapter The table below supplies additional particulars. Pitch range 35° Number of blades 4 Diameter 10’ 9” Rotation R.H. Weight 383 lb. approx. Pin setting angle 48° 30’ Fine pitch angle 31° ± 5’ Balancing angle 50° 00’ Assembly diagram RA.11401-2 Installation diagram RA.11400-6 BEARING. Taper roller. BLADE. Material Covering Sheath Diagram. Dural – – RA.4014 Sheets 1 & 2 NOTE. A limited number only of these propellers have been manufactured. Fur [sic] further details of this type apply to Rotol Limited. PART 2 02 Sect: 1 Description Chap: 1 Detailed Description Appendix R.3/4F5/3 PROPELLER R.3/4F5/3. This propeller is similar to that described in the preceding Chapter The table below supplies additional particulars. Pitch range 35° Number of blades 4 Diameter 10’ 9” Rotation R.H. Weight 393 lb. approx. Pin setting angle 47° 30’ Fine pitch angle 30° ± 5’ Balancing angle 50° 00’ Assembly diagram RA.11401-3 Installation diagram RA.11400-3 BEARING. Taper roller. BLADE. Material Covering Sheath Diagram. Dural – – RA.10061 Sheets 1 & 2 NOTE. A limited number only of these propellers have been manufactured. For further details of this type apply to Rotol Limited. PART 2 02 Sect: 1 Description Chap: 1 Detailed Description Appendix R5/4F5/4 PROPELLER R5/4F5/4 This propeller is similar to that described in the preceding Chapter. The table below supplies additional particulars :– Pitch range 35° Number of blades 4 Diameter 10’ 9” Rotation R.H. Weight 283 lb. Pin setting angle 46° 50’ Fine pitch angle 29° 20’ ± 5’ Balancing angle 50° 00’ Assembly diagram RA.11401-4 Installation diagram RA.11400-5 BEARING. Taper roller. BLADE. Material Covering Sheath Diagram. Hydulignum Rotoloid Brass RA.10046 HRS or Sheets 1 & 2 Jablo PART 2 02 Sect: 1 Description Chap: 1 Detailed Description Appendix R.12/4F5/4 PROPELLER R.12/4F5/4. This propeller is similar to that described in the preceding Chapter. The table below supplies additional details. Pitch range 35° Number of blades 4 Diameter 10’ 9” Rotation R.H. Weight 283 lb. Pin setting angle 39° 50’ Fine pitch angle 22° 20’ ± 5’ Balancing angle 45° 00’ Assembly diagram RA.11401-4 Installation diagram RA.11400-7 BEARING. Taper roller. BLADE. Material Covering Sheath Diagram. Hydulignum Rotoloid Brass RA.10046 HRS or (Sheets 1 & 2) Jablo Spinner Notes Rotol and Constant Speed Airscrews spinner types, please note this image cannot be trusted as a source of accurate dimensional information since it is sourced from a reduced JPG image file of a scanned photocopy of a photocopy of a .......... Part 3 04 Sect: 1 Description CHAPTER – 1. DETAILED DESCRIPTION. (Rotol and C.S.A. type Spinners) GENERAL. 1. The spinner fitted on any Rotol propeller may be in one of two main groups . These are the C.S.A. group of spinners and the Rotol group, the names in each case denoting the manufacturer. 2. The C.S.A. spinner consists generally of a two-piece shell shaped to fit over the blade roots, and attached to a circular back plate mounted on the rear of the propeller hub. It is held on to a back plate secured to the rear of the hub shell by a series of locking nipples which engage corresponding pear-shaped slots in a moveable lock ring. A special key inserted through a slot in the spinner shell moves the lock ring and allows the nipples to engage or disengage the pear-shaped slots, thus permitting the shell to be locked in position or removed from the back plate. 3. The Rotol spinner, while consisting basically of assemblies similar to the C.S.A. type, depends upon an entirely different arrangement for locking the shell to the back plate. In this case a series of forwardly projecting pegs are cush mounted on the back plate and locate in housings fitted to the rear of the spinner shell. A special locking device, accessible through a small hole in the Shell, enables each peg to be locked in its housing, thus securing the shell to the back plate. 4. The two basic groups of spinner noted above are commonly known as "rear drive" types, the locking device in each case being located on the back plate at the rear of the hub. A second distinct type known as the "front drive" spinner is in existence for both main groups, in which the locking device, or driving pegs, are located on a driving plate or ring attached to the front of the hub. Part 3 04 Sect: 1 Description Chap: 1 Detailed Description Appendix 4CM/2 SPINNER TYPE 4CM/2 This spinner is similar to the Rotol spinner type 4CM/- described in the preceding Chapter. Additional information is detailed below. Weight...............................................22 lbs. General Arrangement........................RA.7641. Part 3 04 Sect: 1 Description Chap: 1 Detailed Description Appendix 4CM/4 SPINNER TYPE 4CM/4 This spinner is similar to the Rotol spinner type 4CM/- described in the preceding Chapter. Additional information is detailed below. Weight...............................................24.3/4 lbs. General Arrangement........................RA.7899. Fitting the spinner shell. 29. With Rotol type spinners, one lock on the spinner shell is marked with red paint and must align with a similarly marked pin on the backplate. Locking is effected by turning the “D’ shaped locking pegs with a screwdriver Through 180 deg, to the “LOCKED” position marked on the spinner shell. 30. With C.S.A. type spinners, the words “TO LOCK”, painted on the spinner shell, must align with the key slot in the backplate by inserting the special key (no other implement should be used) and moving it in the direction shown by the arrow. Wood Blade Description The various wooden blades that were manufactured for the Merlin 60 series family powered Spitfire propellers were divided into hard and soft wood varieties. With the Rotol Jablo Wood Blade and Hydulignum Wood Blade types being hard wood versions. While the Weybridge Blade type was a soft wood version. These blades featured either Acetate, Cristofin, Jablo, Rayoid, Rotoloid, Schwarz or Venus protective coverings. It should also be noted that many albeit not all of these blades featured either a a "Simple" or "Armoured" Leading Edge Sheath. The "Simple" sheath was made from non-ferrous metal while the "Armoured" sheath was made from ferrous metal. Part 6 01 Sect: 1 Description Chap: 1 Detailed Description 8. HARD WOOD BLADE. (i) Jablo Wood Blade. This blade is shaped from a block- consisting of a number of compressed wood boards, see Fig.1. Each board is composed of a pack of veneers of Canadian Birch which have been interleaved with thin resin-impreg- nated paper and subjected, during processing, to a com- bination of pressure and heat. The pack of veneers is thus compressed into a homogeneous board about two-thirds the thickness of the original pack. Towards the root end of each board the density is increased by the incorp- oration of extra veneers of graduated length. The com- pressed boards are cemented together to form the block from which the blade is shaped. The root end of the blade is threaded to screw into the steel adapter, and the remainder of the blade is protected with Jablo covering or Rotoloid. The leading edge of the blade may be protected by a metal sheath. (ii) Hydulignum Wood Blade. The block from which this type blade is shaped consists of a number of compressed boards produced from Canadian Birch veneers, see Fig.2. Each veneer is coated with a pigmented thermoplastic resin and the required number assembled into a pack. The pack is then heated and compressed, so producing a board of constant density. A second heating and pressing operation is carried out to obtain the higher density required at the root end. Top and bottom pressure is re-imposed and at the same time the board is subjected, at one end, to a graduated side pressure which reduces its width and corrugates the veneers; thus imparting greater shear strength as well as increasing density. The pro- cessed boards are then cemented to form a block from which the blade is shaped. The root end is threaded to screw into the steel adapter, and the blade protected with Cristofin or Rotoloid covering. The leading edge may be protected by a metal sheath. 9. SOFT WOOD BLADE. (i) Weybridge Blade. This blade is shaped from Sitka Spruce or Douglas Fir boards of natural density, except for the root and portion which is made from boards of a high- density improved timber known as Jigwood, see Fig.3. Jigwood boards are produced from packs of Canadian Birch veneers which, after being coated with a synthetic resin are heated and compressed to the required thickness and density. The spruce or fir boards are scarfed and cemented to short lengths of Jigwood material and the composite boards so formed are cemented together to form a block. The root end is threaded to receive the steel adapter and the block is shaped to the required contour. The blade is protected with one of the following coverings: – Rayoid, Schwarz or Acetate. The leading edge of the blade may be protected by a metal sheath. 10. Protective Covering. (i) Jablo. This covering consists of an envelope of phosphor- bronze gauze completely enclosing the timber of the blade. Successive coats of synthetic resin are brushed on, thus embedding the bronze gauze and effecting its attachment to the blade. With this type of covering the leading edge of the blade is protected by a metal sheath, which is secured to the blade with screws and rivets, or alternatively the sheath may be soldered to a brass under-strip. This covering is applied only to blades manufactured from Jablo wood. (ii) Rotoloid. This is a skin of cellulose nitrate, approximately 0.040 in. thick which completely covers the timber of the blade. The leading edge of the blade may be protected by a metal sheath. (iii) Cristofin. A thermo-plastic synthetic resin which sets hard on drying. The resin is applied in successive brush coats until the required thickness is built up. The leading edge of the blade may be protected by a metal sheath. (iv) Rayoid. A cellulose nitrate skin approximately 0.040 in. thick. Blades using this covering may have the leading edge protected by a metal sheath. (v) Schwarz. This covering consists of a cellulose acetate skin, approximately 0.040 in. thick, reinforced with linen fabric. With this type of covering the leading edge of the blade is protected by a continuous brass sheath. This covering is applied only to blades manufactured from Sitka Spruce or Douglas Fir. (vi) Acetate. This is a cellulose acetate skin approximately 0.040 in. thick. The leading edge of the blade may be protected by a metal sheath. (vii) Venus. A synthetic resin which sets hard on drying. The resin is applied in successive brush coats, with a suitable drying time between application, until the required thick- ness is built up. The leading edge of the blade may be protected by a metal sheath. Note: – Rotoloid Covering 0.040 in. thick has now superseded Jablo Covering, Cristofin Covering and Venus Covering for all new production wood blades of “Rotol” design. Leading Edge Sheath. 11. The metal sheath, fitted to the leading edge, protects the propeller blade from possible damage caused by stones etc., being picked up when the aircraft engines are run over a loose surface. 12. There are two types of sheath in use, the “Simple” sheath manufactured from non-ferrous metal and the “Armored” sheath which is made from ferrous metal. The method of attachment to the blade is dependent upon the blade design and the type of protective covering used. 13. Jablo wood blades using Jablo covering have a segmented non- ferrous or ferrous metal sheath attached to the leading edge. The metal sheath may be soldered to a brass under-strip which is secured to the blade by screws where the timber is of sufficient thickness, i.e. near the root, and by copper rivets as the tip of the blade is approached. 14. When a leading edge sheath is fitted to a Jablo wood blade using Rotoloid covering, each segment of the sheath is attached to the blade by screws at the root and those sections where the wood is of sufficient thickness and by rivets at the tip sections. 15. Hydulignum wood blades using Cristofin or Rotoloid covering will have the leading edge sheath attached in a manner similar to that described in para.14. 16. With the soft wood – Weybridge – blade, using Schwarz covering, a non-ferrous metal sheath formed in a continuous length is soldered to a strip of phosphor-bronze gauze. The bronze gauze, which exceeds the width of the metal sheath, is secured to the blade leading edge by a number of special steel staples. 17. Those soft wood – Weybridge – blades, using Rotoloid or Acetate covering will have the leading edge sheath, when fitted, attached in a manner similar to that described in para.14. Wood Blade Identification and Markings RESERVED Aluminium Alloy Blade Description RESERVED Aluminium Alloy Blade Identification and Markings RESERVED Propeller Paint 7. All wood blades are spray-finished with matt black paint and the outer four inches of the blade are painted yellow to ensure a visible disc when the propeller is rotating. Part 6 01 Sect: 7 Repair and Salvage Chap: 1 Repairs PAINTING. 38. After repair of covering, except Emergency Repairs, the repaired parts shall be painted. (i) Spray or paint with Grey Surfacer and allow to dry. (ii) Spray or paint two or three coats of Matt Night, DTD.751/4. (iii) The four-inch yellow tip should be given two or three coats of Identification, Yellow DTD.751/5 (iv) Paint a White line, 1/32 in. wide at 0.70 of the original radius, across the thrust face of the blade. This line indicates the blade pitch angle checking station and should be at right angles to the longitudinal axis. (v) Blade identification markings should be made good. Note. New Weybridge blades are painted with Glossy Black Primer and Air Drying Matt Black, DTD.63A, and these may be used as alternatives on Weybridge blades. Pictures and more text will follow later......... Cheers, Daniel. Notes * This aircraft is likely to be the much photographed by RAF, Official Photographer, Flying Officer L H Baker, Spitfire FIX; MH653,RZ-U of 241 Sqn, this aircraft is not Spitfire FVIII JF756 which at the time did not belong to 241 Sqn. shown below is a list of all known 241 Sqn aircraft during January of 1944. List of known 241 Sqn RAF aircraft during January of 1944 Hawker Hurricane IIC, Merlin XX, KW968 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 61, EN244 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FVIII, Merlin 63, JF427 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FVIII, Merlin 63, JF510 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FVIII, Merlin 63, JF512 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FVIII, Merlin 63, JF521 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FVIII, Merlin 63, JF558 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FVIII, Merlin 63, JF560 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FVIII, Merlin 63, JF592 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FVIII, Merlin 63, JF702 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 63, LZ831 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 63, MA425 - RZ-R Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 63, MA580 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 63, MA767 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 63, MA800 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 63, MA854 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 63, MH320 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 63, MH329 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire LFIX, Merlin 66, MH508 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire LFIX, Merlin 66, MH599 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 63, MH651 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 63, MH652 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 63, MH653 - RZ-U
  12. RAAF P-51D question

    I am looking to build a specific RAAF Mustang with the new Airfix kit, namely A68-766 in 1946. According to the source I have Mustangs with serials in the range A68-600 to 813 were P-51D's. Is anyone able to confirm (or not) that I am safe making use of the kit's provided cuffed HS propeller. I cannot find any photographs of the said aircraft, but I have found some artwork which would indicate a cuffed propeller is OK. Many thanks in advance. Cheers Simon
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