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Found 15 results

  1. I believe the thread hit its maximum size so was automatically locked. I have had a few PM's. If you don't like the thread don't subscribe. For those who enjoyed the melting pot...knock yourself out HERE IS THE LINK TO THE 1ST THREAD WITH LOTS OF QUESTIONS, ANSWERS and PHOTOS - START here TIP: search from Google, enter the search parameters followed by site:www.britmodeller.com
  2. Supermarine Spitfire Mk.IX (more) Brassin and Bronze Resin Accessories for Eduard Kit 1:72 Eduard No sooner had we reviewed the last (huge) pile of resin goodies for their very own Spitfire Mk.IX kit, (see here) than Eduard dispatched another pile of bits pieces. This time around the upgrades include bronze undercarriage legs, resin upper cowls and resin ordnance to add interest to the underside of your Spit. Supermarine Spitfire Mk.IX Top Cowls for Eduard Kit 1:72 Eduard Eduard have produced two resin upper cowling pieces for their new kit, although they are nearly impossible to tell apart. As far as I can tell, the only difference is a subtle change to the hydraulic reservoir access panel at the very aft edge of the cowl. Nevertheless, the parts are well made and will be handy if you wish to finish your model with an exposed engine. Top Cowl Early Top Cowl Late Supermarine Spitfire Mk.IX Legs Bronze with Wheels for Eduard Kit 1:72 Eduard We reviewed four sets of replacement resin wheels and undercarriage doors last month, so it was a surprise to find another two sets in this month's box from Eduard. These sets are different, however, as they include bronze undercarriage legs as well as the same resin parts that were contained in the original sets. The bronze legs will be a lot stronger than their plastic equivalents, but don't expect anything extra in terms of detail. If anything, the cast detail is a little soft (or certainly no shaper than the plastic legs supplied with the kit. Even so, if you handle your models a lot, then these might be worth the extra investment. Spitfire Mk.IX Legs Bronze with 5 Spoke Wheels, Smooth Tyre Spitfire Mk.IX Legs Bronze with 4 Spoke Wheels, Pattern Tyre Supermarine Spitfire Mk.IX 500lb Bomb and Drop Tank for Eduard Kit 1:72 Eduard Unlike the items pictured above, these are not really direct replacements for the kits parts (although long range fuel tanks and a couple of small bombs are included with the kit). They are really nicely cast though, and the photo etched details on the bomb will instantly set it apart from any plastic equivalent. Supermarine Spitfire Mk.IX 500lb Bomb Supermarine Spitfire Mk.IX Drop Tank Conclusion There's nothing much wrong with Eduard's new IX, but even the best kits can be improved on, not least because of the limiting factors resulting from the use of injection moulded plastic. Naturally Eduard themselves have provided the means to enhance their new kit. Even if one or two of these items could be described as gilding the lily, there can be no denying the quality of design and manufacture. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  3. Spitfire Mk.IXc Late Version Profipack 1:72 Eduard When the prototype Spitfire took to the air for the first time on 5 March 1936, few involved could have foreseen where the development of the type would lead. By the end of the Second World War, the type had earned itself a place in the history books as well as the nation's psyche. One of the ultimate Merlin powered variants was the Mk.IX. The Mk.IX was a response to the appearance of the Focke Wulf Fw190, which proved itself more than a match for the Spitfire Mk.V. Powered by the two-stage supercharged Merlin 61, the performance of the Mk.IX was a quantum leap over its forebears, enabling the Spitfire to meet its German foe on equal terms. By the end of the War, over 5,600 Mk.IXs rolled off the production line at Castle Bromwich. Eduard have earned an excellent reputation in recent years with world-class models such as their 1:72 Hellcat, Bf110 and MiG-15. Their models typically feature a mixture of exquisite detail and superb if complex engineering which puts them right at the pinnacle of modern kit manufacturers. The latest all-new 1:72 kit to roll off the Prague production line is the Spitfire Mk.IXc Late Version, the first in a series of new Mk.IX Spitfire kits from the Czech manufacturer. The kit arrives packed into a glossy, top-opening box adorned with a picture of Pierre Clostermann's aircraft in combat over Europe. Inside the sturdy box are five sprues of parts moulded in the blue-grey plastic often used by Eduard and a single sprue moulded in clear plastic. Altogether there are well over 150 plastic parts and, as this is a profipack edition, the plastic parts are accompanied by a small fret of pre-painted photo etched parts and a set of die-cut paint masks. The instruction book is a glossy, stapled A5 affair which includes full-colour painting diagrams. The overall impression is of a really premium quality package. The quality of the mouldings is up to the usual Eduard standard, with clean, crisp details and no flaws anywhere. As with other recent kits from Eduard, there is plenty of fine detail, with parts such as the cockpit comparable to high-end resin items (which, in turn, should tell you how good Eduard's resin cockpit is). The surface detail on the outside of the airframe is exquisitely rendered, with fine recessed panel lines and delicately engraved rivet and fastener detail. It's clear from the outset that Eduard have taken an uncompromising approach when it comes to detail. The cockpit is fabulous, particularly so in this Profipack edition with its extra photo etched parts. I don't think I've ever seen a Spitfire kit in this scale with a seat made up of three parts, so it's just as well that a set of pre-painted harnesses have been included too. There is a choice of plastic or photo etched parts for the pilot's armour, and further tiny photo etched details for the control column and throttle controls. The instrument panel also benefits from the addition of photo etched parts, with a detailed plastic alternative provided if you don't fancy using the metal parts. Unusually, the cockpit sidewalls have been moulded separately. I can only think that Eduard have done this in order to maximise the amount of detail they have been able to pack in, as well as paving the way for their resin cockpit, which uses the same approach. Once the cockpit has been assembled and painted, it can be fitted between the vertically split fuselage halves, along with the engine firewall, a blank part into which the propeller is fitted later on, and the pilot's head armour. The leading edge wing root also has to be fitted at this stage. The fact that these parts have been moulded separately to the rest of the kit is testament to Eduard's commitment to detail, if not buildability! The breakdown of the wing is no less complex. As you might expect, the lower wing has been moulded as a single span, with separate upper wing surfaces. Between the two you must sandwich seven parts which together make up the walls of the main landing gear bay. The ailerons and wing tips have been moulded separately, which allows multiple version to be built from the same moulds (alternative parts are included but marked as not for use for the aircraft depicted on this kit's decal sheet). The same applies to the rudder and elevators. Multiple alternatives are included on the sprues, so make sure you use the correct version for your intended subject. Choice is good though, as it makes for a very comprehensive package. The upper and lower cowlings are moulded separately, with the former split along the middle. Even the wing radiators are made up of six parts each, with the surface of the radiators themselves picked out in photo etched metal in this boxing. Turning the model over, the undercarriage is just as detailed as the rest of the kit. Each of the main landing gear legs is made up of seven parts, with the tyres moulded separately to the hubs and photo etched parts to represent hob covers (where fitted). The separate tyres will make painting easier, which is just as well as the included paint masks don't cater for the landing gear. A long range fuel tank and a couple of small bombs are included, as are a two different types of slipper tanks. The wing cannon barrels are moulded separately, which means they can be added at the end of the build in order to avoid accidental damage. Two different canopies are included depending on whether you wish to finish your model with the canopy open or closed. This is just as well given all the superb detail in the cockpit. As this is a profipack edition, a full set of canopy masks has been included. Ive used Eduards pre-cut masks a number of times now and have always found them to be excellent for turning a time consuming chore into a quick and easy job. Eduard are usually pretty generous with the decal options in their profipacks, and this is no exception. Choices are provided for the following six aircraft: Spitfire LF Mk.IXc MJ586, No. 602 Squadron, flown by Pierre Clostermann, Longues sur Mer Airfield, July 1944; Spitfire HF Mk.IXc ML296, No.312 Squadron, flown by F/Lt Otto Smik, RAF North Weald, August 1944; Spitfire LF Mk.IXc MH712, No.302 Squadron, flown by W/O Henryk Dygala, Summer/Autumn 1944; Spitfire LF Mk.IXc MJ250, No.601 Squadron, Italy, Summer 1944; Spitfire LF Mk.IXc ML135, No.401 Squadron, flown by Jerry Billing, RAF Tangmere, 7 June 1944; and Spitfire LF Mk.IXc ML135, No.401 Squadron, flown by Jerry Billing, France, 1 July 1944. All of the aircraft are finished in a variation of the Ocean Grey/Dark Green over Medium Sea Grey scheme with the exception of MJ250 which is finished in silver/natural metal. Each option is illustrated with a four-view colour profile. The decals look crisp, thin and glossy and the colours used are nice and bold. Conclusion Given Eduard's track record with their recent 1:72 scale kits, it should come as no surprise that their Spitfire is so good. It is both accurate and highly detailed, putting it some way ahead of most other 1:72 kits on both counts. The addition of photo etched parts and masks makes this edition as close to a complete package as its possible to get, as well as being superb value for money. The only downside is the kit's complexity, with the part count alone exceeding Airfix's new Spitfire Mk.I in the larger 1:48 scale. Other than that, this kit looks mighty impressive on the sprue and can be highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  4. I tend to have a number of posts and was about to start another. Edgar is great with his answers so maybe we can all use one place for our Q and A, I just received Hayes owners manual and I noticed that the cutaway depicts both TR9 (Top) and side antenna. Interestingly none of the restored spits have any wires showing. I am doing and early MKIX so was wondering what the low down was on when to use both, none, only one type? Next (stupid questions - I am doing one of the desert polish MK IX's Eduards paint ref show no walk lines. I looked at a poor quality photo, to no avail. I know that the early Vb's were rushed out and repainted on arrival. I would have thought that by the time the MK IX's were dispatched they would have come in desert cammo with all the bells and whistle i.e. "no step" etc.
  5. Painting a Merlin ENGINE

    I have just finished the ICM Merlin, for my Mk IX (don't tell me its a poor example - seen that in other posts) - I can live with it). Now I have looked at a tone of pics and I read somewhere that Edgar mentioned something about grey ext, However I have the 1/32 book by Brett Green and Co on the Tamiya Spitfire and there the Engine seem to be solid black except for exhausts and top covers. I have been told that in service, an engine is just a big black block. Its primed and ready for a dash of colour or not. Thoughts please.
  6. Inspired by robvulcan and PC2012's builds it is now my turn to have a bash at a large scale detailed Spitfire. This is another in my series of builds "Aircraft my Father Fixed". Up to now I've built mostly the aircraft my Father worked on while in Burma in the latter half of WWII while attached to 5 Squadron. before that he was with 81 Squadron from their entry into Operation Torch at Gibraltar Oct '42 up until Sicily had been pacified in Oct-Nov1943 whereupon he was transferred to Cairo en-route to India and 5 Squadron. Funnily enough, 81 Squadron followed his his wake a couple of weeks later and ended up based 5 miles down the road in India, re-equipping with Spitfire VIII, hence why I have a Christmas dinner menu from 81 Sqn in 1943: Anyway, back to Tunisia in the spring/summer of 1943. Up to that point, the squadron had been equipped with Spitfire Vb Trop and Vc Trop (hence my earlier abortive attempt to convert the Hobbyboss Vb Trop to a Vc Trop), however these were beginnign to be outmatched by the German aircraft. The Tropical filters used on the V series had an unfortunate side-effect of reducing overall performance of the engine. So in May '43 81 Sqn started receiving Spitfire IXs. At this point they were based in Tunisia at Souk-el-Khemis airfield and subsequently moved to other airfields in the general vicinity. From reading Alan Peart's book "From North Africa to the Arakan" you get to see that conditions on these airfields were basic to say the least. So I want to try to capture a snapshot of the activity of the groundcrew in these conditions in my diorama. So to begin with, the model - you've all seen plenty of sprue shots so I won't bother here, but at least here is the box: For the base I'm using a 300x300 wooden base supplied by one of my IPMS Farnborough colleagues from his website: http://www.ema-heritage.com/displaybases.html That should give enough space for the aircraft and some activity around it. Speaking of which, the donor kits for figures, materials etc include this lot: Yes I know there is 1:35 scale figures in there but my Dad was only 5' 5" tall, so they'll be okay On th eleft you can see some of the ValueGear stuff that I used in my Hurricane diorama earlier in the year. This stuff is superb, huge variety and excellent casting and detail. I picked up a set of crates as well which you can see in the glass ashtray in the top left. Above that is the IconAir accumulator trolley I built originally for the Hobbyboss build. I've added a small engine on the top of it to represent the generator that was fitted to many of them. This was sourced from the US Maintenance Yard kit from the compressor you can see at the bottom right of the box top picture. For the Spitfire I've got a collection of Decals for the inside and outside that will allow me to represent EN204 FL-L: (from the Osprey book "Spitfire Aces of North Africa and Italy) Note how the original "E" lettering has been badly overpainted to turn it into a "L" Here are the decals I'll use: There is a huge amount of aftermarket stuff for this kit and here is a selection of what I may or may not be using: There are wheels, seat, large cannon wing covers, cockpit door with seperate crowbar (not to be painted red!!), Cockpit upgrade set, cockpit stbd sidewall, "cloth" seatbelts PE Toolbox by Aber (just like the one I have in the Hurricane dio) and finally the PE set for the Hobbyboss Vb, but which contains some very useful bits for this build, eg the PE radio hatch door which will be used elsewhere on this build! I actually started this build a couple of weeks ago but haven't got very far because in the weather we've been having the man-cave shed is to flipping cold!! So I've come up with a cunning plan... Part of the delay was waiting for all the parts to arrive and also to do the research for the various things I want to do. Here is a sample of some of the reference material I've collected: This of course doesn't show the e-book PDF of Monforton's book or the other reference photos, sites etc that I've used and will be using. I've printed some of the engine photos and stuck them up: which gives away my cunning plan to get around the cold weather situation... move a lot of the modelling stuff into a temporary table in the lounge! All the airbrushing will still have to be done in the shed, but at least I can build and brush paint in comfort! I began on the figures as I was waiting. I picke dout two from the 8th army set and one form the Tank riders set: The Tank rider figure in grey had to have the top of his head rebuilt as I won't be putting a steel helmet on him, instead he'll get an RAF side cap at a suitably rakish angle! I began work on the engine and my aim is to add as much detail as I can bear to. The inspiration for that is the amazing Hornet build being undertaken by airscale in another thread here: http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234950214-hph-de-havilland-hornet-sea-hornet-f-mk22-tt202/ Truly magnificent stuff and if I can get anything approaching this, I'll be very happy! Progress so far: Its all a bit bland and OOB so far - well apart from the replacement resin rocker covers with the Rolls Royce logo on them. This will change as time progresses I hope. Now since I've got an accumulator trolley in The diorama, there should be somewhere for it to plug into: Voila! So of course there is also the question of the starboard rear panel I've been pestering people about on another thread... this one: As you can see I've successfully cut it out without causing damage to the surrounds and next to it is the PE Radio access panel from the VB PE set which is near enough the same size (its about 1.75 inches too tall, but that won't be noticeable when its hanging open. Here is the inside of it: which has superb fine detail. One of the things that my researches show for this access hatch is that the inner frame is very visible, with all its lightening holes present. So I'm going to have to scratch build that so that means removing the existing rib detail in the kit: So thats where I stand so far - bloody hell its taken an hour to write this post! I'd better get on with the rest of the day...
  7. Spitfire IX XVI BEST KITS 1/72

    Following the interest and good comments on a thread I started about the XIV kits, I am going to create another thread but this time about the IX. In this thread I will sum up the pros and cons of each kit from the mainstream manufacturers. I to create a useful resource to those looking for the best IX kit. Airfix (IX) Pros Pretty cheap at £7 Really easy to get your hands on Really easy to build Nice decals (two options) Good shape and looks good overall Cons Deep panel lines Wing chord too thick at roots No cockpit detail The canopy is fairly thick and one piece No detail in the wheel wells General lack of detail Italeri (IX) Pros Very cheap Three piece canopy Nice panel details Easy build Nice glass pieces Small and pointy rudder High flying versions (separate kit) Cons Small nose (as was on the V's converted to IX's FILLER MONSTER Inaccurate blisters Detail lacking Sloped radiators KP (IX & XVI highback) Pros It's fairly cheap Decals are good and there's few different options Cons Raised panel lines Rubbish cockpit Needs filler Shapes a bit wrong in places Bad detail Bad wheels Canopy looks totally wrong as does the mirror AZ Model (IX, VII, VIII & XVI) Pros Brilliant detail Brilliant decals Good price (the Joypack is excellent price at around £15 for 3 (without decals)) Panel detail is fantastic Two or three piece canopy Very accurate Cons I've never made the kit so I can't comment Reviews basically say there are no significant bad points Clipped wing tips have to be sawn off if you want to glue on normal span Sword (IX & XVI) Pros Comes with resin Good canopy Fantastic details Great decals Builds very well very accurate Good all over Cons It is a bit expensive at £13 Not for beginers Heller Pros It's ok price It's a good shape overall The prop is, in fact, very very kids out of the cheaper kits Cons Raised panel lines DREADFUL decals (I cannot stress this enough) Cockpit isn't great Really bad radiators Bad exhausts Czech Master Resin (IX, Tr.IX & XVI) Images courtesy of Mark Davies http://www.hyperscale.com/2010/features/spitfiretr972md_1.htm Pros Fantastic detail and panel lines Great cockpit detail Great decals Very accurate Superb kit Full resin kit Cons Very expensive Full resin kit (this is both a pro and a con as a lot of people aren't familiar with full resin) Please feel free to correct me on any of the above Ben
  8. Rotol Equipment for Spitfire Mk VII, VIII and IX plus (X, XI & XVI) Aircraft Pictured above as photographed by Royal Air Force (RAF), Official Photographer, Flying Officer (F/O) L H Baker is an unidentified 241 Squadron (Sqn), RAF Merlin 63 powered Spitfire FIX (probably MH653, RZ-U*), being serviced by Aircraftman (AC1) Jim Birkett of B Flight and Leading Aircraftman (LAC) Wally Passmore of Maintenance Flight at Canne, Vesuvius, Italy during 27 January 1944. It Appears to be fitted with an R.3/4F5/4 type propeller featuring Hydulignum blades with Rotoloid coverings and an Armoured sheath (secured by screws and rivets) with a 4CM/4 Rotol type spinner and GRF/4A governor unit. The following information drawn mostly from the 1950 "Publication No 504, Series 01, Repair & Service Manual, Rotol Equipment for Spitfire Mk VII, VIII & IX" details the various types of propellers and spinners that were fitted to Spitfire Mk VII, VIII, IX & XVI aircraft. Of particular interest to the aviation artist, modeller and or kit maker is a list that describes various propeller and spinner assemblies with their respective aircraft and engine combinations. Information on paint finishes and identification markings are also revealed, as is more importantly the use of both the Rotol Limited and Constant Speed Airscrews (CSA) Limited spinners. The before mentioned spinner types account for previously observed differences such as length between some surviving Merlin 60 series family powered Spitfire spinners. Please note that all of the text in green as shown below is quoted verbatim from the above mentioned Rotol Limited Repair & Service Manual. Rotol Equipment List Publication No 504 Series 01 Reference 7124 ROTOL EQUIPMENT FOR SPITFIRE MK VII, VIII & IX AIRCRAFT LIST OF EQUIPMENT The items of Rotol equipment used on the various Marks of Spit- fire aircraft are shown in tabular form below. Spitfire Mk. VII, VIII & IX. Merlin 61 engine PROPELLER SPINNER GOVERNOR UNIT R.3/4F5/2 4CM/2 GRF/4A R.3/4F5/3 4CM/2 GRF/4A R.3/4F5/4 4CM/4 GRF/4A Merlin 64 engine PROPELLER SPINNER GOVERNOR UNIT R.3/4F5/4 4CM/4 GRF/4A Spitfire L.F. Mk. VIII & IX. Merlin 66 engine PROPELLER SPINNER GOVERNOR UNIT R.3/4F5/4 4CM/4 CGR/1A x x For details of the CGR/1A Governor Unit apply to Rotol Limited. Propeller Descriptions PART 2 02 Sect: 1 Description Chap: 1 Detailed Description Appendix R3/4F5/2 PROPELLER R3/4F5/2 This propeller is similar to that described in the preceding Chapter The table below supplies additional particulars. Pitch range 35° Number of blades 4 Diameter 10’ 9” Rotation R.H. Weight 383 lb. approx. Pin setting angle 48° 30’ Fine pitch angle 31° ± 5’ Balancing angle 50° 00’ Assembly diagram RA.11401-2 Installation diagram RA.11400-6 BEARING. Taper roller. BLADE. Material Covering Sheath Diagram. Dural – – RA.4014 Sheets 1 & 2 NOTE. A limited number only of these propellers have been manufactured. Fur [sic] further details of this type apply to Rotol Limited. PART 2 02 Sect: 1 Description Chap: 1 Detailed Description Appendix R.3/4F5/3 PROPELLER R.3/4F5/3. This propeller is similar to that described in the preceding Chapter The table below supplies additional particulars. Pitch range 35° Number of blades 4 Diameter 10’ 9” Rotation R.H. Weight 393 lb. approx. Pin setting angle 47° 30’ Fine pitch angle 30° ± 5’ Balancing angle 50° 00’ Assembly diagram RA.11401-3 Installation diagram RA.11400-3 BEARING. Taper roller. BLADE. Material Covering Sheath Diagram. Dural – – RA.10061 Sheets 1 & 2 NOTE. A limited number only of these propellers have been manufactured. For further details of this type apply to Rotol Limited. PART 2 02 Sect: 1 Description Chap: 1 Detailed Description Appendix R5/4F5/4 PROPELLER R5/4F5/4 This propeller is similar to that described in the preceding Chapter. The table below supplies additional particulars :– Pitch range 35° Number of blades 4 Diameter 10’ 9” Rotation R.H. Weight 283 lb. Pin setting angle 46° 50’ Fine pitch angle 29° 20’ ± 5’ Balancing angle 50° 00’ Assembly diagram RA.11401-4 Installation diagram RA.11400-5 BEARING. Taper roller. BLADE. Material Covering Sheath Diagram. Hydulignum Rotoloid Brass RA.10046 HRS or Sheets 1 & 2 Jablo PART 2 02 Sect: 1 Description Chap: 1 Detailed Description Appendix R.12/4F5/4 PROPELLER R.12/4F5/4. This propeller is similar to that described in the preceding Chapter. The table below supplies additional details. Pitch range 35° Number of blades 4 Diameter 10’ 9” Rotation R.H. Weight 283 lb. Pin setting angle 39° 50’ Fine pitch angle 22° 20’ ± 5’ Balancing angle 45° 00’ Assembly diagram RA.11401-4 Installation diagram RA.11400-7 BEARING. Taper roller. BLADE. Material Covering Sheath Diagram. Hydulignum Rotoloid Brass RA.10046 HRS or (Sheets 1 & 2) Jablo Spinner Notes Rotol and Constant Speed Airscrews spinner types, please note this image cannot be trusted as a source of accurate dimensional information since it is sourced from a reduced JPG image file of a scanned photocopy of a photocopy of a .......... Part 3 04 Sect: 1 Description CHAPTER – 1. DETAILED DESCRIPTION. (Rotol and C.S.A. type Spinners) GENERAL. 1. The spinner fitted on any Rotol propeller may be in one of two main groups . These are the C.S.A. group of spinners and the Rotol group, the names in each case denoting the manufacturer. 2. The C.S.A. spinner consists generally of a two-piece shell shaped to fit over the blade roots, and attached to a circular back plate mounted on the rear of the propeller hub. It is held on to a back plate secured to the rear of the hub shell by a series of locking nipples which engage corresponding pear-shaped slots in a moveable lock ring. A special key inserted through a slot in the spinner shell moves the lock ring and allows the nipples to engage or disengage the pear-shaped slots, thus permitting the shell to be locked in position or removed from the back plate. 3. The Rotol spinner, while consisting basically of assemblies similar to the C.S.A. type, depends upon an entirely different arrangement for locking the shell to the back plate. In this case a series of forwardly projecting pegs are cush mounted on the back plate and locate in housings fitted to the rear of the spinner shell. A special locking device, accessible through a small hole in the Shell, enables each peg to be locked in its housing, thus securing the shell to the back plate. 4. The two basic groups of spinner noted above are commonly known as "rear drive" types, the locking device in each case being located on the back plate at the rear of the hub. A second distinct type known as the "front drive" spinner is in existence for both main groups, in which the locking device, or driving pegs, are located on a driving plate or ring attached to the front of the hub. Part 3 04 Sect: 1 Description Chap: 1 Detailed Description Appendix 4CM/2 SPINNER TYPE 4CM/2 This spinner is similar to the Rotol spinner type 4CM/- described in the preceding Chapter. Additional information is detailed below. Weight...............................................22 lbs. General Arrangement........................RA.7641. Part 3 04 Sect: 1 Description Chap: 1 Detailed Description Appendix 4CM/4 SPINNER TYPE 4CM/4 This spinner is similar to the Rotol spinner type 4CM/- described in the preceding Chapter. Additional information is detailed below. Weight...............................................24.3/4 lbs. General Arrangement........................RA.7899. Fitting the spinner shell. 29. With Rotol type spinners, one lock on the spinner shell is marked with red paint and must align with a similarly marked pin on the backplate. Locking is effected by turning the “D’ shaped locking pegs with a screwdriver Through 180 deg, to the “LOCKED” position marked on the spinner shell. 30. With C.S.A. type spinners, the words “TO LOCK”, painted on the spinner shell, must align with the key slot in the backplate by inserting the special key (no other implement should be used) and moving it in the direction shown by the arrow. Wood Blade Description The various wooden blades that were manufactured for the Merlin 60 series family powered Spitfire propellers were divided into hard and soft wood varieties. With the Rotol Jablo Wood Blade and Hydulignum Wood Blade types being hard wood versions. While the Weybridge Blade type was a soft wood version. These blades featured either Acetate, Cristofin, Jablo, Rayoid, Rotoloid, Schwarz or Venus protective coverings. It should also be noted that many albeit not all of these blades featured either a a "Simple" or "Armoured" Leading Edge Sheath. The "Simple" sheath was made from non-ferrous metal while the "Armoured" sheath was made from ferrous metal. Part 6 01 Sect: 1 Description Chap: 1 Detailed Description 8. HARD WOOD BLADE. (i) Jablo Wood Blade. This blade is shaped from a block- consisting of a number of compressed wood boards, see Fig.1. Each board is composed of a pack of veneers of Canadian Birch which have been interleaved with thin resin-impreg- nated paper and subjected, during processing, to a com- bination of pressure and heat. The pack of veneers is thus compressed into a homogeneous board about two-thirds the thickness of the original pack. Towards the root end of each board the density is increased by the incorp- oration of extra veneers of graduated length. The com- pressed boards are cemented together to form the block from which the blade is shaped. The root end of the blade is threaded to screw into the steel adapter, and the remainder of the blade is protected with Jablo covering or Rotoloid. The leading edge of the blade may be protected by a metal sheath. (ii) Hydulignum Wood Blade. The block from which this type blade is shaped consists of a number of compressed boards produced from Canadian Birch veneers, see Fig.2. Each veneer is coated with a pigmented thermoplastic resin and the required number assembled into a pack. The pack is then heated and compressed, so producing a board of constant density. A second heating and pressing operation is carried out to obtain the higher density required at the root end. Top and bottom pressure is re-imposed and at the same time the board is subjected, at one end, to a graduated side pressure which reduces its width and corrugates the veneers; thus imparting greater shear strength as well as increasing density. The pro- cessed boards are then cemented to form a block from which the blade is shaped. The root end is threaded to screw into the steel adapter, and the blade protected with Cristofin or Rotoloid covering. The leading edge may be protected by a metal sheath. 9. SOFT WOOD BLADE. (i) Weybridge Blade. This blade is shaped from Sitka Spruce or Douglas Fir boards of natural density, except for the root and portion which is made from boards of a high- density improved timber known as Jigwood, see Fig.3. Jigwood boards are produced from packs of Canadian Birch veneers which, after being coated with a synthetic resin are heated and compressed to the required thickness and density. The spruce or fir boards are scarfed and cemented to short lengths of Jigwood material and the composite boards so formed are cemented together to form a block. The root end is threaded to receive the steel adapter and the block is shaped to the required contour. The blade is protected with one of the following coverings: – Rayoid, Schwarz or Acetate. The leading edge of the blade may be protected by a metal sheath. 10. Protective Covering. (i) Jablo. This covering consists of an envelope of phosphor- bronze gauze completely enclosing the timber of the blade. Successive coats of synthetic resin are brushed on, thus embedding the bronze gauze and effecting its attachment to the blade. With this type of covering the leading edge of the blade is protected by a metal sheath, which is secured to the blade with screws and rivets, or alternatively the sheath may be soldered to a brass under-strip. This covering is applied only to blades manufactured from Jablo wood. (ii) Rotoloid. This is a skin of cellulose nitrate, approximately 0.040 in. thick which completely covers the timber of the blade. The leading edge of the blade may be protected by a metal sheath. (iii) Cristofin. A thermo-plastic synthetic resin which sets hard on drying. The resin is applied in successive brush coats until the required thickness is built up. The leading edge of the blade may be protected by a metal sheath. (iv) Rayoid. A cellulose nitrate skin approximately 0.040 in. thick. Blades using this covering may have the leading edge protected by a metal sheath. (v) Schwarz. This covering consists of a cellulose acetate skin, approximately 0.040 in. thick, reinforced with linen fabric. With this type of covering the leading edge of the blade is protected by a continuous brass sheath. This covering is applied only to blades manufactured from Sitka Spruce or Douglas Fir. (vi) Acetate. This is a cellulose acetate skin approximately 0.040 in. thick. The leading edge of the blade may be protected by a metal sheath. (vii) Venus. A synthetic resin which sets hard on drying. The resin is applied in successive brush coats, with a suitable drying time between application, until the required thick- ness is built up. The leading edge of the blade may be protected by a metal sheath. Note: – Rotoloid Covering 0.040 in. thick has now superseded Jablo Covering, Cristofin Covering and Venus Covering for all new production wood blades of “Rotol” design. Leading Edge Sheath. 11. The metal sheath, fitted to the leading edge, protects the propeller blade from possible damage caused by stones etc., being picked up when the aircraft engines are run over a loose surface. 12. There are two types of sheath in use, the “Simple” sheath manufactured from non-ferrous metal and the “Armored” sheath which is made from ferrous metal. The method of attachment to the blade is dependent upon the blade design and the type of protective covering used. 13. Jablo wood blades using Jablo covering have a segmented non- ferrous or ferrous metal sheath attached to the leading edge. The metal sheath may be soldered to a brass under-strip which is secured to the blade by screws where the timber is of sufficient thickness, i.e. near the root, and by copper rivets as the tip of the blade is approached. 14. When a leading edge sheath is fitted to a Jablo wood blade using Rotoloid covering, each segment of the sheath is attached to the blade by screws at the root and those sections where the wood is of sufficient thickness and by rivets at the tip sections. 15. Hydulignum wood blades using Cristofin or Rotoloid covering will have the leading edge sheath attached in a manner similar to that described in para.14. 16. With the soft wood – Weybridge – blade, using Schwarz covering, a non-ferrous metal sheath formed in a continuous length is soldered to a strip of phosphor-bronze gauze. The bronze gauze, which exceeds the width of the metal sheath, is secured to the blade leading edge by a number of special steel staples. 17. Those soft wood – Weybridge – blades, using Rotoloid or Acetate covering will have the leading edge sheath, when fitted, attached in a manner similar to that described in para.14. Wood Blade Identification and Markings RESERVED Aluminium Alloy Blade Description RESERVED Aluminium Alloy Blade Identification and Markings RESERVED Propeller Paint 7. All wood blades are spray-finished with matt black paint and the outer four inches of the blade are painted yellow to ensure a visible disc when the propeller is rotating. Part 6 01 Sect: 7 Repair and Salvage Chap: 1 Repairs PAINTING. 38. After repair of covering, except Emergency Repairs, the repaired parts shall be painted. (i) Spray or paint with Grey Surfacer and allow to dry. (ii) Spray or paint two or three coats of Matt Night, DTD.751/4. (iii) The four-inch yellow tip should be given two or three coats of Identification, Yellow DTD.751/5 (iv) Paint a White line, 1/32 in. wide at 0.70 of the original radius, across the thrust face of the blade. This line indicates the blade pitch angle checking station and should be at right angles to the longitudinal axis. (v) Blade identification markings should be made good. Note. New Weybridge blades are painted with Glossy Black Primer and Air Drying Matt Black, DTD.63A, and these may be used as alternatives on Weybridge blades. Pictures and more text will follow later......... Cheers, Daniel. Notes * This aircraft is likely to be the much photographed by RAF, Official Photographer, Flying Officer L H Baker, Spitfire FIX; MH653,RZ-U of 241 Sqn, this aircraft is not Spitfire FVIII JF756 which at the time did not belong to 241 Sqn. shown below is a list of all known 241 Sqn aircraft during January of 1944. List of known 241 Sqn RAF aircraft during January of 1944 Hawker Hurricane IIC, Merlin XX, KW968 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 61, EN244 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FVIII, Merlin 63, JF427 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FVIII, Merlin 63, JF510 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FVIII, Merlin 63, JF512 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FVIII, Merlin 63, JF521 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FVIII, Merlin 63, JF558 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FVIII, Merlin 63, JF560 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FVIII, Merlin 63, JF592 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FVIII, Merlin 63, JF702 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 63, LZ831 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 63, MA425 - RZ-R Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 63, MA580 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 63, MA767 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 63, MA800 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 63, MA854 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 63, MH320 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 63, MH329 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire LFIX, Merlin 66, MH508 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire LFIX, Merlin 66, MH599 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 63, MH651 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 63, MH652 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FIX, Merlin 63, MH653 - RZ-U
  9. Does anyone have any photos or diagrams of whats inside the rear inspection panel on the starboard side of the Spitfire fuselage? I believe from what I've found so far is that this gave access to the battery for the 12v electrical system, but I'm looking for more detailed images of this part of the aircraft. All help gratefully received - this is in preparation for the next phase of my "Aircraft my Father Fixed" project, a 1:32 Tamiya Spitfire IX in 81 Sqn colours from Tunisia in 1943. Thanks
  10. Spitfire Cockpit IX v V

    In my haste I ordered an Aires Mk V cockpit for the Hasegawa Kit. The Kit I have is TamIya. I have now ordered the correct replacement. I have a Hasegawa IX and was wondering if there was much difference and I could use the "wrong" cockpit (i.e. MK V) in the Mk IX?
  11. SPITFIRE IX Moshe 70

    This makes for an interesting pic. Anybody know anything about this aircraft. It has some interesting features. Type C wing Cannon and 50 Cal. and what appear to be out board .303's Bob racks What I assume are rocket racks Now the little I know the main batch of spitfires were LF IXe bought form Czechoslovakia after the '48 war, Israel acquired a batch from Italy. Someone in another forum states that the IAF had a number of IXc. I can't find any proof of this other the the first 2 spits which where pieced together from bits and pieces (D130 and another) As always looking forward to learning from the boffs out there.
  12. Hi all, I completed this Spitfire a week or two ago but have only just completed this diorama. This diorama is almost a what-if, I have no idea what actually happened JEJ-Jr when Johnnie Johnson left the Canadian wing, however my best guess is that they kept hold of it and used it for beer runs. Officially designated Mod. XXX, HM R&C stepped in and prevented any further exports of beer as taxes were not paid on the exports. Despite this, squadrons still did weekly runs to collect beer with little (if any) opposition from Commanding Officers. Ben.
  13. Hi all, Over the summer I did a lot of reading as I was recovering from an operation, one of the books I read was Tom Neil's - The Silver Spitfire. It tells the story of Neil working with the US and how he came to own the Silver Spitfire as well as how it became silver. Without giving any more away, this diorama is of an incident that occurred upon arrival in France. A bit about the diorama before pics. I was originally going to do a usual diorama with the pilot stood outside looking at the mess he made. However, I liked the look of the slate that is the base so much I thought it'd look just as nice without the grass. I tried my hand at scratch building the flaps, open canopy and cockpit detail. The flaps are made out of plastic and thin bits of wire. Overall I'm pleased as I got this model for only the price of the P&P because I used Airfix Flying Hours. Furthermore I started building this at 10 last night and finished at miday today. So I only spent a few hours on it. Anyway, enough of my rambling... Comments and criticism welcome as always Ben.
  14. Hello, Finally got around to finishing the little details on Airfix's Spitfire IX. I used Swords airscrew and exhausts as they are miles better than Airfix's offering. Painted in MK329 this aircraft was made up out of Spitfire wrecks before being flown as a hack aircraft. I havent a clue what the fate of this aircraft was, however, I suspect it stayed with the Canadian 2TAF wing it flew with as they advanced through the low countries before being dumped. Invasion stripes and sqn codes were hand painted, the fuel tank was scratch built as well as the seat belts. Chipping effect was done with a sponge and the exhaust stains done with oil paints (first time using them). The entire airframe was given a heavy ink wash. It's also worth noting that this kit can be picked up for less than 7 pounds (I got for £3 using flying hours). Furthermore it only took three evenings to complete. It looks nearly as good as Freightdog's XIV which costs £16 and took me two WEEKS to build. Ben.
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