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Found 470 results

  1. This is part III in my series on the Gulf of Sidra incident. The short encounter on 19 August 1981 in which two Tomcats shot down two Libyan Fitters. After the E-2C Hawkeye and the Su 17 Fitter I recently finished the Hasegawa kit of the A-7E Corsair II. I fitted the model with a D-704 Buddy Pack by Attack Squadron under the port wing, and two fuel tanks under the starboard wing, as seen on a picture of this particular aircraft from September 1980. The specific markings of the "403" were homemade and the squadron markings were provided by an old decal set from Microscale. Hope you like!
  2. “Welcome back my friends to the show that never ends. We're so glad you could attend! Come inside! Come inside!” For myself and my favorite all time musical group, 2016 was not a good year. To Keith Emerson and Greg Lake RIP. Your gift of music was outstanding. I have been absent from this fine forum for about a year now (other than occasionally lurking about and being jealous of fantastic builds that happen here every day). December 2015 I woke up with shooting pains throughout my body coupled with numbness in my extremities. Being the ever-diligent person I am and realizing that just ignoring it would not make it go away, (Not that I would ever try that, heaven forbid!) I began a wonderful odyssey of various health professionals poking, prodding, inserting, inspecting and failing to detect why I now had no feeling in my hands. The general pain shooting throughout my body had ceased, but there was absolutely no feeling in my hands. The best I can describe it is they feel as if they are constantly asleep. Anyway, going through a bunch of medical people that suggested everything from diabetes, (nope), carpel tunnel (nope), neuropathy (nope), cancer (not again) to me just being mental I came away with a wonderful diagnosis of we don’t know why you have no feeling in your hands, but we don’t think it is endangering your health. Yeah, didn’t make sense to me either. The best guess for my condition is narrowed to two causes, neither of which, I understand, is curable. The first, and my favorite, is I was exposed to some unknown chemical in Southeast Asia from either the U. S. forces or the communist forces and it is just now showing up. Now I did go into some very interesting areas where I shouldn’t have been, and into jungles that shouldn’t have anything sprayed in them but there was, and I was not privy to what was used, how it was to affect humans, as my chances of surviving the war were minimal. My cheery little group had 100% plus casualty rate. (Never could understand how that could be, except most of us got wounded at least once and foolishly kept returning to fight. Option one then is some unknown chemical has resided in my body for about 45 years and is just now starting to run rampant, cheery huh? The second option and what I really think is more likely is I have had shingles since 1990 when they were triggered by some cancer treatments. Just was told that sometimes as a side effect, you just loose feeling in your extremities, usually your hands. The cure, same as for shingles, just learn to live with it. And, for the last year my brothers in plastic, I have been learning to use my hands without having any feeling in them. You take for granted how much the sense of touch comes into play on a day by day basis. How tightly do you hold a Styrofoam cup? (Okay, I know I shouldn’t be using them, but some places still sell drinks that way!) Most people can feel the cup sidewalls beginning to give in by touch and then just maintain that pressure. By trial and error and many drink mishaps, I learned just how much to think to hold the cup so I didn’t either drop it or squish it. Same for holding eating utensils, cracking eggs (that was a fun lesson, the kitchen was a mess), holding glass bottles over tile floors. The amusing one that still gives me fits is how hard to grip pills when I take them out of a bottle to keep them from falling out of my hand. In regards to modeling, “Hi! My name is George. I am just learning how to assemble plastic kits. Bear with me!” So, from a rather massive stash (more on that later) I chose a relatively easy build to begin the trek back to putting plastic pieces together. The kit is 1/48 Hasegawa Bf 109 E-3. This will not only be a WIP for the 109, but probably, an interesting lesson on how much touch is used in model construction. I really am a newbie. I went to my trusty Photobucket account and can’t sign in. When I did sign in, it wouldn’t let me into my library or download pictures. Once that was sorted out, then I try to upload to Britmodeller and everything has changed with the new software version. ARGGGGHHHHHH. Okay, blood pressure back to normal so here goes. The kit looks very nice. Here is the box cover art and the plastic innards. It has some photo etch and a nice selection of decal choices. The first job is the cockpit. The selection of parts is nice. The seat has some basic seat belt detail, not great, but for me and this build adequate And the instrument panel is nothing to write home about, but for this build, some dry brushing will be enough as the canopy will be closed. Any resemblance to the actual panel instruments and the kit detail representation is strictly coincidental! I now will try to see how well I can botch a kit that should go together by itself. Wish me luck. As always, all comments are welcome.
  3. Hi everyone Last weekend I had some time off from work so I decided to clean out and remodel my workshop.... ....and in doing so I found a plane I started 3 years ago the Hasegawa 1/48 Hawker Typhoon 1b which as the title says will be built as MP197 using the rather lovely decals from Aviaeology AOD48003 Typhoon Special. At the time I had the Barracuda cast cockpit upgrade..... ...which in my opinion looks lovely, its just a shame most of it will never be seen again! Oh and for those observant amongst you you would have noticed the head armour is missing, I broke it off many moons ago but I still have it and I'll reattached it nearer the end of the build. General model pictures..... ....my 1/24 version is still on going but it is my long build so I need smaller stuff to keep me sane!
  4. After jumping in with my first 'Ready for Inspection' post, here's my first WIP. My enjoyment of the extra details and interior bits-and-bobs with the Tamiya 1/32 Corsair led to this, my second, 1/32nd scale build. It was a gift, and if I am honest - I have never been a lover of the P40 in any of its variants, and I really don't know why. It's an amazing looking aircraft, huge spinner, shoulder heavy, and so on... It's just never really grabbed me. But either way... Here goes. I will, as usual, be working with brush paints and rattle cans - as I do not (yet) own an airbrush. Sadly this means colours - both interior and exterior - are likely only vague approximations, and not mixed to historically accurate levels. As far as after-market add ons, I plan to use a mask for the canopy, and I have ordered the CMK resin undercarriage bays with canvas covers... This will be my first time using resin add-ons. So any advice regarding these particular items is welcome. From colouring (seems like a dark grey / green is best), to the fit and so on. Just seemed worth adding a bit of pazzazz to this kit. First up, I added some extra wire to the cockpit walls. This stuff is cast offs from by fuse-boxes on the pavement. I always see so much of it, and just pick it up and pop it in my bag. Anyway - stripped it down, and drilled some small holes to house the ends, then glued it down. Not sure how accurate, but at 1/32 I wanted to add some more visual detail. Then parts were primed with flat grey, as was the cockpit floor and rear cockpit wall. These were then sprayed lightly with aluminium silver before being lightly blotched with artists' watercolour masking fluid, which was left to dry (25 mins) before being sprayed at an angle with something close(ish) to an interior green. Then surfaces were brushed with an old toothbrush... (NB - A new fancy toothbrush with rubber nubbins seems to make this task significantly easier than doing it with a bristle-only brush). I then brush painted some details onto the side walls, added some spurious decals from past kits (once again - for visual effect at the expense of accuracy), did an oil wash of mixed black and brown, and finally made a mixed pigment from mainly 'mud green', with a touch of 'sand' and 'dark brown' which I splodged all over the foot-end of the floor. Next up is a matt varnish on it all, and then on to the instrument panel. Thanks for looking, and any comments most welcome.
  5. As my ludicrously long Sea Vixen build finally shows signs of drawing to a close, thoughts turn to what to build next. I always try to have two things on the go at any one time, with the other being my never-ending Ark Royal build - but there is a limit to how much 1/350 scratch building and detailing I can stand at any one time, and I need to have something in 1/48 (my aircraft scale of choice) to keep me going. I thought about a twin Buccaneer build - an Anti-Flash White S1 and an Ark Royal (4) final commission S2D. Those will come at some point, since I have the kits and the necessary conversion materials. But watching the splendid work of Steve (Fritag), Debs (Ascoteer) and others has convinced me that it is high time I built something that I actually flew myself. Sea King or Lynx, Sea King or Lynx... much indecision was finally tilted towards the Queen of the Skies by all the press coverage of its retirement from RN SAR service earlier this year (though the ASaC7 Baggers will soldier on for a while yet), and by markdipXV711's excellent build of an 819 SAR cab which he and I flew in together 20-odd years ago. So, since 819 (my other Sea King squadron) has just been done, I have finally plumped for an aircraft from my first tour. Pull up a bollard and listen to a true dit. 820 Naval Air Squadron, 1988, 18 months into my first front-line tour. We were part of Ark Royal (5)'s CAG (carrier air group) throughout my time on the Squadron, and in July 1988 the ship plus 801 (8 x Sea Harrier FRS1), 849B Flight (3 x Sea King AEW2), a detachment from 845 (2 x Sea King HC4) and 820 (9 x Sea King HAS5) set off for Australia, via Malta, Singapore, Hong Kong, Brunei and Subic Bay (Philippines), and home via Mumbai and Gibraltar. 6 months away, and a bloody good time was had by all... Less than 2 weeks after we sailed, we were taking part in a NATO exercise in the approaches to the Med; basically we were playing the bad guys trying to force a passage through the straits, and a number of RN, USN and Spanish units were trying to stop us... including HM Submarines Torbay, Otter and Opportune. The aim of these exercises is not to be 100% realistic, but to make sure that there is maximum interaction, so occasionally there would be a 2 hour pause where the submarines, having come right inside the screen and "attacked" the hell out of the ships, would withdraw 30 miles and start again. We would knock off tracking them and leave them alone to reposition. In those long distant 1980s Cold War days, ASW was our bread and butter, and on the whole we were pretty good at it. Most of the time we did passive ASW - chucking huge quantities of sonobuoys out of the aircraft and finding submarines that way, often working with our Nimrod and P3C brethren, and often working against USSR boats rather than friendly exercise ones. In my first few weeks on the squadron we rippled 3 (3 cabs airborne 24/7) all the way from Norfolk VA to Harstad in Norway, including several days of tracking 2 Victor IIIs that were taking an interest in our games. It was pretty exhausting, but we could keep it up almost indefinitely. For the guys in the back, passive ASW was often good fun; 3-dimensional chess, and all that. But for the pilots it was skull-shatteringly dull, flying around at 4-5,000' (nosebleed territory for any self-respecting helicopter pilot) and stooging at 70kts for maximum endurance for hour after hour after hour. But on this occasion we were doing active ASW, the task for which the Sea King was originally designed. Active ASW in the daytime is enormous fun for the pilots, especially when you are in contact. At night the aircraft flies the profiles for you, closely monitored by the pilots (since you are down at 40', you want to keep a close eye on things in the pitch black; it can be a tad buttock-clenching at night). In the day, however, you generally fly it all yourself ("manual jumps" as the jargon goes) without any assistance from the AFCS (automatic flight control system), and it's a blast. So there you have the scene. I am 18 months into front line flying, and have reached the dizzy heights of being captain of my own crew. My P2 for this trip is a hugely experienced USN exchange pilot (way more experienced than me, but flying as second pilot while he gets up to speed with RN procedures). We do 45 minutes of active Torbay bashing, but then reach the pre-briefed pause while she repositions. Rather than disrupt the flying programme, we simply keep going, so we have taken a plastic milk float with us (hi tech, I tell you) and are doing some grappling training; chuck the milk float out of the back and practice SAR with it - much harder than it sounds, cos the milk float thrashes around in the down wash, so it is great training for the back seat in conning the aircraft and the front seat in hovering it precisely. A few minutes into the grapple work, with Jim the USN guy on the controls, the port engine stops... or so we thought. The Nr (rotor speed) decays as the good engine runs out of puff (too hot and too heavy to hover on one engine) and we subside rapidly onto the water yelling Mayday and punching the windows out. Phil Smith, the Observer, says he had never seen anyone strap in as fast as poor old BJ Sandoe, the Crewman who had been lying on the floor of the aircraft with his head sticking out, conning Jim onto the milk float, when suddenly the Atlantic Ocean came up to greet him. As I reached up to shut down the No 2 engine (cos you sure as heck don't want to abandon a helicopter while the rotors are still turning) it became apparent that the No 1 engine had not in fact failed, but simply run down to flight idle. The fuel computer had developed a fault and tried to shut the throttle, but there is a physical interlock built into the system for precisely this emergency, called the Flight Idle Stop, which is basically a screw jack that prevents the throttle from closing beyond a certain point - the very last thing you do when starting up is to engage it. So we over-rode the computer and managed the throttle manually, the Nr came back up to where it should be and shot off the surface of the sea like a startled rabbit, downgraded our Mayday to a Pan, and flew back to Mum. A Green Endorsement much later (still on the wall of my loo) and very shaky legs for a few hours afterwards. Well, it has to be this cab, doesn't it? So I present to you ZE419 / 014 / R of 820 Naval Air Squadron in July 1988; a bog standard Sea King HAS5. Dark blue (this was just before the days when everything became grey), black markings. Photos of the real aircraft to follow, I expect, but for now she is one of these in the distance (photo taken the day before we sailed from Pompey, so about 2 weeks before the ditching): The aircraft will be built much as in this photo, actually; folded, included the tail, with engine blanks in. The cabs in the photo have tip socks on, but I will probably build mine with the more robust blade support system known as "Forth Road Bridge" gear (as in this Mk 5 at the Fleet Air Arm Museum): The basis of the model will be the Hasegawa 1/48 Sea King, using the "Ark Royal HAR5" [no such thing; it should be HU5] edition (which for some reason Photobucket refuses to rotate, so turn your head): ...and the excellent Flightpath conversion set, which contains all sorts of goodies important to this build - notably weapons carriers, assorted aerials and a tail rotor much better suited to having a gust lock fitted to it. Herewith statutory sprue shot: ...and pic of the contents of Flightpath box and a couple of other aftermarket goodies: As it happens, I also have a Hasegawa AEW2a kit (acquired before the Mk5 kit was released, as the only game in town for a future Mk5 build). This will also be useful, since it contains a number of applicable bits such as Orange Crop ESM aerials (removed from the HU5). And since all the Hasegawa boxings are variations on the same theme, the kit already contains some parts that I will use - e.g. the HU5 has the sand filter in front of the engine intakes, but in my era we simply had the "barn door"; similarly the HU5 has the sonar removed and a blanking plate fitted. The kit contains both a barn door and a (sort of, -ish) sonar. [i also have a second complete "Ark Royal HAR5", designated eventually to be an 819 SAR aircraft... but not yet]. There will not be much progress for a few days, while I get the Vixen over the line.... Herewith photo of the appropriate log book entry (bottom line:
  6. I've had this in the stash for a little while now: Here are the main sprues, there are two sets of these: Clear parts, the resin replacement forward engine section for the F2A-3 variant, instructions and decals: I'll be using the resin nose and building the USMC aircraft shown on the box cover, MF-15 of the Marine's VMF-221 squadron which was flown by Captain William Humberd in defence of Midway Island on 4th June 1942 in the course of which he claimed a Zero and a Kate destroyed and a second Kate as damaged. VMF-221's losses were terrible as their F2A-3's were underpowered, overweight and lacking in manoeuverability compared to the Zeroes that they faced. Most of the Marine pilots had little or no combat experience, but Captain Humberd survived the day and was awarded the Navy Cross; I haven't been able to find any reference to his subsequent career or later life. I was quite tempted to build the other box-art aircraft as I believe it was flown by Jimmy Thach and I have already built an Airfix Wildcat in the markings of the aircraft he flew, but I wanted to build a Dutch ML-KNIL (Royal Netherlands East Indies Air Force) - I had originally bought the Special Hobby boxing for this purpose: ...but having read that it is something of a challenging build (this being the politest way I can think of putting it) I chickened out; Bill 'Navy Bird' built a really lovely RAAF Buffalo I from the basically same kit, but I am no Navy Bird... I shall keep the kit and perhaps one day will be man enough to take it on, but in the meantime I will use some of the transfers to complete the second Hasegawa kit as a B-339C No.3100 as flown by Lt. August 'Guus' Diebel of 2-VLG-V based in Java in early December 1941. This unit was later moved to Singapore where the Dutch B-339's flew alongside the RAF and RAAF Buffaloes. Lt. Diebel claimed 2 Nate fighters in a Japanese raid on Singapore on 12th January 1942, though he was subsequently wounded and forced to bail out. He survived the war with three credited kills and in 1948 was awarded the Military William Order (the highest honour awarded by the Netherlands) but died in 1951 when the Gloster Meteor he was flying crashed at Uithuizen in the Netherlands. The aircraft in question is the top one shown on the back of the box: To build the kit as a B-339 I will need to replace the naval tailcone with the land-based version featuring a larger tailwheel - this is not provided by the kit but at some point I had bought the Quickboost replacement along with a couple of Eduard mask sets - good work, Past Me, your foresight is appreciated: The paint scheme for the USMC F2A-3 is USN Blue Gray over USN Light Gray, the interior will be Bronze Green, all by Sovereign Hobbies Colourcoats: For the Dutch aircraft the scheme was Oudblad (old leaf) and Jongblad (young leaf) with Aluminium-painted undersides. If I understand correctly Oudblad and Jongblad were Olive Drab 41 and what would become Medium Green 42 but I can't swear to it - fortunately for me Jamie of Sovereign Hobbies is a near-neighbour of my folks up in Aberdeen and some time ago as a result of some persistent wheedling, cajoling, whining and snivelling he got me a couple of samples of the colours in question: Close to a brownish OD and Medium Green, as it happens. These colours and the European Dutch LVA colours are not currently available but I think Sovereign will get a new batch made up at some point in the future. As noted above, the F2A-3 kit has a resin extended lenght nose to represent the 10-inch extension added to this variant to include additional fuel tankage... this requires some surgery to some of the kit parts, which I shall start with as if I am given the opportunity to mess something up I will usually take it and if I am to ruin everything I would rather do so before I have invested too much time and effort into the rest of the kit... Sorry for all the blurb and congratulations if you have made it this far Cheers, Stew
  7. Hi all. Needed something to keep me going before christmas day so i visited my local hobby shop in Ely and picked up this 1/72 mustang for a tenner. Bargain bouquet ! What a lovely kit, and a pleasure to build. Really enjoyed my first experience with Hasegawa. Pro’s: Its a Mootang. Superb fit & lovely detail. Fun to build! Con’s: Decals on the thick side All comments and critique very, very welcome. Hope you enjoy the pictures. Cheers! Thanks for looking!
  8. After Hasegawa 2016 (http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235000783-hasegawa-2016/ - thanks 172flogger) I open a new topic for Hasegawa's 2017 reissues and monthly newsfiles. The first one will be: - ref. 08246 - 1/32nd - Boeing F4B4 - original kit: https://www.scalemates.com/kits/148093-hasegawa-js-066-boeing-f4b-4 Release expected on January 22nd, 2017 Source: http://www.hasegawa-model.co.jp/product/08246/ V.P.
  9. I know I haven't finished the Luchs yet but I picked this wee beastie up at Telford, liked the box art, and parted with very few readies (cheap I tells ya) 'Oooo zimmerit!' I thought..... Suppose I should have checked before jumping to conclusions Sprue shot with holes because... I did a bit No sign of zimmerit So... do I go nuts and manually, yes, by hand, apply scale zimmerit coat to this.. er... very small, big cat. Have to say I've also been eying up the moulded in tools too I wonder if there are better tracks for it Or.. and this is where I could do with some input, should I go strictly OOB to see what I can make of a basic kit with glue and a lick o' paint? Ooooh input! That's one for you Johnny boy Fixit Phil P.S. Why do I never see the spelling mistakes BEFORE I submit the post?
  10. Completing my set of US Navy fighters is my latest effort. Hasegawa's 1/48 F/A-18F Super Hornet. A nice kit overall but a bit lacking in the weapons department. Finished with Xtracyrlix and a brush in the markings of VFA-2 on board USS Abraham Lincoln in 2004. Decals from Cam Pro sheet 48-015. With its predecessor from VF-2. All four together.
  11. Starting with this kit: And planning to complete as Israeli AF livery. No decals other than leftover insignias from Phantoms and Eagles - so very DIY.
  12. Hi guys! I forgot the reasons why this one wasn't finished, I hope not too many pieces are missing... Also, I wonder what will happen when that masking tape will be pulled away Ciao. Roberto.
  13. Hi all Some pics of my first completed build for 2017, Hasegawa 1/48 Desert Snake Stuka. Only modifications were plastic wedges on ailerons replaced with actuators in brass plus Eduard seatbelts & gunsight. The mould has been reboxed many times and is showing it's age a bit now with more flash to be removed but still well worth the effort in the long run. Thanks for looking
  14. #2/2017 Second Yom Kippur pair is finally finished. Hasegawa kit (VA-55 A-4E/F), decal sheets for Ayits are no longer available or at least hard to get, therefore had to use different sources, the stencils are from the kit, the roundels from the Hobbycraft A-4E/H kit, the numbers from an Isradecal number sheet and the squadron badges from Isradecal Mystere sheet. Gunze acrylics for the camo, Quickboost seat, Snakeeyes, MER and LAU-3 rocket pods from Hasegawa weapon set. The model shows an aircraft of IAF Squadron No.116 "Flying Wing" during the Yom Kippur War in 1973. DSC_0001 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0002 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0003 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0004 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0005 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0006 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0007 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0008 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0009 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0010 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0011 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0012 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0013 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0014 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0015 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0016 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0017 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0018 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0019 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0020 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0021 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0022 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr
  15. Hi folks, I've decided for my New Year's Resolution that I am going to fully participate in the group builds for 2017 and follow the schedule to the letter (I heard u laughing)!! No I'm definitely going to give it my best shot - so to get the year off to a good start I've joined the F-16 group build with the following kit: I'm hoping to get cracking in the next couple of days so I will keep you posted on progress. I'm going to keep this one OOB and see how I get on. Good luck everyone
  16. I’m hoping to do a few F-16s from The Air Force Flight Test Center at Edwards AFB. The first will be this F-16B. Done as the Automatic Terrain Following test bird from the LANTIRN Test Force I’ll be using some home made decals for the tail markings (middle left): At some point I’ll do the “Bozo Fleet” (test support aircraft) markings as depicted in the Hasegawa kit, but I’ve yet to find a clear coat that does not yellow over time. Sven Old Viper Tester
  17. Have had this in the stash for 5 years now and it needs to be built! The Hasegawa 1/32nd General Dynamics F-16A (Kit #S20) which will be built OOB and in the mid 70's era 'Demonstrator' red/white/blue colour scheme, aircraft serial 75-0745. Michael
  18. Hasegawa is to release a 1/72nd Sukhoi Su-35 "Flanker-E" kit. Source: http://www.ipmsdeutschland.de/Ausstellungen/Nuernberg2014/Bilder_AT/Hasegawa_04.htm V.P.
  19. Will be building this kit As the F-16D Digital Flight Control System (DFLCS) test jet With home-made tail markings lower middle on the sheet Sven Old Viper Tester
  20. My latest completion, a Hasegawa 1/72 scale F-16B. A good practice run for the F-16 GB. The tail markings are homemade and represent an aircraft from the F-16 Combined Test Force at Edwards AFB in 1989 used for development testing of the Air Defense Fighter variant. Used Eduard photo-etch for the cockpit, Master AOA and pitot probes and missiles from the Hasegawa weapons set. The target ID light on the left side is an MV lens. The Eduard set provides details to spruce up the kit ejection seats, which are pretty basic, but they don’t include the green emergency oxygen bottle on the left side of the seat. The bottle is a pretty prominent part of the ACES II so I represented them with pieces of stretched sprue painted with green from the little Testors square bottle. The high-speed data recorder pod on the centerline is made from the front portion of two F-16 centerline tanks The Eduard HUD frame went pinging off to feed the carpet monster, so I replaced it with a basic from made from beer can aluminium. The Hasegawa kit decals for the national insignia, air refueling stenciling and walkway lines have a brownish cast to them. This is most prominent on the walkway stripes, so I left them off. I’ll have to check my decal stash for suitable replacements for the stars and bars. Thanks for looking, Sven Old Viper Tester
  21. Hi All, Picked this up last year at Hinckley, second hand sans original decals, But these were in the package too, So I guess I'll be doing "Old Yeller" then. I'll need to add a second seat and for true accuracy the cuffs need to come off the propellor blades but no one else would know chez Bonhoff so the second may not happen.
  22. This is my first post on here but I've been lurking on and off for a few years. I've been building model aircraft for a while but after a few years in which model railways have been my main interest I've returned to aircraft and over the summer I've built a few (finally finished an Airfix Eurofighter, Airfix Boston, Airfix Lightning F2A and an Airfix Vampire T11). I have built very few non-Airfix kits (just a few Revell kits) and this was my first Hasegawa kit. I picked this aircraft for no particular reason other than it looked interesting to build - it was very much an impulse buy. A little research later revealed that this kit is very old and as I discovered is rather poorly detailed. However for only £7.49 I think it was worth it! Overall fit of the parts was OK, except that the locating tabs on the undercarriage doors and weapons pylons didn't 'snap' home as some more recent kits do. The instructions, especially for painting were nowhere near as good as Airfix instructions, although as I have built quite a few kits now they didn't really cause me much trouble. I'm quite happy with the result, it's perhaps not my best paint finish as there are quite significant 'ridges' along the grey-white boundary. But I can cope with that. It was all brush painted and decals were those supplied with the kit. My only change was to replace part of one of the undercarriage assemblies with a piece of a paperclip cut to length because the original fell off or got lost at some other point, I never did quite work out what happened to it. Overall build time was 9 days, one of my fastest ever. Of that, construction probably only took about 4 days, if that. Anyway, on to the pictures: Thanks for looking.
  23. Because the MiG-21 is gonna be finished tomorrow, my dad starts with the Su-7 of the second Yom Kippur pair. Using the Kopro edition of this kit with Linden Hill Decals to build an Iraqi fighterbomber. And when the Mirage will be finally done, an A-4E Ayit will follow, using a Hasegawa kit with decals from Hobbycraft and Sky Decals
  24. Here's my Revell Spitfire IXe/XVI (Hasegawa repop) converted using the Brigade Models fuselage and a few extra AM bits. It's a representation of the Boultbee Flight Academy's aircraft which I flew in 2014. The full trauma associated with its build is at the Aussie Modeller website. Not a great result but it fills a spot in the cabinet and looks the part if you don't look too close: It's supposed to look like this: I even made up a decal for the signatures on the front cockpit door (every WWII Spitfire pilot who's flown in the aircraft has autographed the door, as has HRH Prince Harry who flew it a couple of months before me). Unfortunately, it's barely visible and my blundering errors take attention from it anyway. I made it harder for myself by opening up the doors and canopies but you get that...
  25. Hi all Here are a few shots of my take on Cresswell's P-40E. I performed the following to the kit. Fuselage - kit seat replaced with Ultracast resin seat - antenna wire made from stretched sprue - kit exhaust replaced with Quick Boost resin exhaust - recognition light replaced with MV Products lens - photo-etched ring sight added Wings - wing gun barrels drilled out - landing light replaced with MV Products lens - kit wheels replaced with Ultracast smooth tread resin wheels Paint and Decals - airframe painted with Xtracolor X391 Vert Fonce, X101 Dark Earth FS10118 and X138 ADC Grey FS16473 - all markings are from Cutting Edge Pyn-up PYND48025 Curtiss Cuties Part 2 - model is weathered with chalk pastels References - Kagero Monograph No. 36 Curtiss P-40 Volume 1 - Kagero Monograph No. 40 Curtiss P-40 Volume 2 - Kagero Monograph No. 43 Curtiss P-40 Volume 3 - Detail and Scale Vol. 62 P-40 Warhawk Part 2 - Squadron Walk Around No. 8 P-40 Warhawk - MBI Books Curtiss P-40 - Kookaburra RAAF Camouflage & Markings 1939-45 Vol. 1 Cheers Randy