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Found 530 results

  1. Second in my double build, this will be my entry using the older ghost gray scheme. I had already done a Gulf War F-15 about a year ago and did not feel like repeating. Instead, I had in my stash this wonderful and colorful F-15J from Tac Meet 2013. Lots of lightning bolts. Awesome cartoon bear in the fins. This is Japanese creativity at its best! The kit will be built entirely OOP. First steps were the cockpit. I read somewhere that some of the JASDF Eagles kept their avionics bay in the original metallic emerald color so I will keep them as such. There is sadly, no equivalent in acrylic so I used the instructions' recommended Gunze metallic blue-green which is a bit too blue compared to the real thing. Not a big issue frankly.
  2. My dad´s gonna build a second G-6 besides the Romanian one, using the already initially for the other 109 built up fuselage. According to the Werknummer this one is an Erla built a/c. Selfmade rear cockpit hatch
  3. After already showing slight withdrawal symptoms, my dad´s gonna build another 109. Using the good old Hasegawa G-6 kit with decals from RB Productions. Doing "Blue 10" but don´t know yet if it´s gonna be a pro-German or Pro-Russian scheme.
  4. I'm doing a double build this time (on separate threads), one of which is a Hasegawa F-15C Bitburg MiG killer in 1/72 scale. Why this one? Because I want to do one in Mod Eagle and the other in the older ghost gray scheme. Decals will come from the excellent Two Bobs "Eifel Eagles" set. The kit will be the basic Hasegawa kit which I have already built numerous times so this will be a relatively quick and painless build (I also have a lot of time on my hands!). The kit itself has good fit, although the engines are a bit fiddly and the nose section fit with the fuselage has some alignment issues. Surprisingly for a Hase kit, the cockpit has phenomenal detail not least the avionics bay; overall one of the best I have seen in 1/72 scale. The rest of the kit shows some age, although the panel lines are nice and thin, there's no rivet detail at all and there's a bit of flash here and there. Anyway, let's get on with it: first steps were the cockpit parts and painting some of the fuselage interior bits.
  5. #15/2017 My father wanted to build a Phantom for a longer time now. Finally he decided to build one and we chose an IIAF scheme, looks good and it is linked to my mother´s past. When she was a young women in the 60ies she was married to a Persian and lived in Tehran. Due to a heart condition her husband died after some years and she moved back to Austria. Back then one of her brothers-in-law was Maj.Gen. Abolhassan FATTAHI, Commander of the IIAF Depot. Thanks to the Internet I found out that he made it to Lt.Gen. and emigrated with his family to the US. He passed away in 2013 and is buried now together with his wife at the Andrew Chapel Cemetary in Dranesville/Virginia. https://billiongraves.com/grave/Abolhassan-Fattahi/504970#/ Used the good old Hasegawa kit. Main markings from Hi-Decal, some stencils from the kit, the rest from Icarus Decals. Compared with pics of the real a/c the stencils don´t match the Iranian ones 100% but good enough. Resin seats from Quickboost (Aires) which are a bit too short, so my dad but some plastic sheet under them. Some PE details for the canopies from Airwaves. Camo with Gunze H311 FS36622, mixed Tamiya XF-55 Deck Tan with XF-59 Desert Yellow, XF-64 Red Brown and Gunze H309 FS34079 The model shows an aircraft of 11th TFS (Fighter Weapons School), TFB 1 Mehrabad 1978. During the following Iran-Iraq war it saw extensive action and was credited with a MiG-23 kill. DSC_0001 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0002 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0003 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0004 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0005 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0006 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0007 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0008 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0009 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0010 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0011 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0012 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0013 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0014 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0015 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0016 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0018 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0020 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0021 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr
  6. As my ludicrously long Sea Vixen build finally shows signs of drawing to a close, thoughts turn to what to build next. I always try to have two things on the go at any one time, with the other being my never-ending Ark Royal build - but there is a limit to how much 1/350 scratch building and detailing I can stand at any one time, and I need to have something in 1/48 (my aircraft scale of choice) to keep me going. I thought about a twin Buccaneer build - an Anti-Flash White S1 and an Ark Royal (4) final commission S2D. Those will come at some point, since I have the kits and the necessary conversion materials. But watching the splendid work of Steve (Fritag), Debs (Ascoteer) and others has convinced me that it is high time I built something that I actually flew myself. Sea King or Lynx, Sea King or Lynx... much indecision was finally tilted towards the Queen of the Skies by all the press coverage of its retirement from RN SAR service earlier this year (though the ASaC7 Baggers will soldier on for a while yet), and by markdipXV711's excellent build of an 819 SAR cab which he and I flew in together 20-odd years ago. So, since 819 (my other Sea King squadron) has just been done, I have finally plumped for an aircraft from my first tour. Pull up a bollard and listen to a true dit. 820 Naval Air Squadron, 1988, 18 months into my first front-line tour. We were part of Ark Royal (5)'s CAG (carrier air group) throughout my time on the Squadron, and in July 1988 the ship plus 801 (8 x Sea Harrier FRS1), 849B Flight (3 x Sea King AEW2), a detachment from 845 (2 x Sea King HC4) and 820 (9 x Sea King HAS5) set off for Australia, via Malta, Singapore, Hong Kong, Brunei and Subic Bay (Philippines), and home via Mumbai and Gibraltar. 6 months away, and a bloody good time was had by all... Less than 2 weeks after we sailed, we were taking part in a NATO exercise in the approaches to the Med; basically we were playing the bad guys trying to force a passage through the straits, and a number of RN, USN and Spanish units were trying to stop us... including HM Submarines Torbay, Otter and Opportune. The aim of these exercises is not to be 100% realistic, but to make sure that there is maximum interaction, so occasionally there would be a 2 hour pause where the submarines, having come right inside the screen and "attacked" the hell out of the ships, would withdraw 30 miles and start again. We would knock off tracking them and leave them alone to reposition. In those long distant 1980s Cold War days, ASW was our bread and butter, and on the whole we were pretty good at it. Most of the time we did passive ASW - chucking huge quantities of sonobuoys out of the aircraft and finding submarines that way, often working with our Nimrod and P3C brethren, and often working against USSR boats rather than friendly exercise ones. In my first few weeks on the squadron we rippled 3 (3 cabs airborne 24/7) all the way from Norfolk VA to Harstad in Norway, including several days of tracking 2 Victor IIIs that were taking an interest in our games. It was pretty exhausting, but we could keep it up almost indefinitely. For the guys in the back, passive ASW was often good fun; 3-dimensional chess, and all that. But for the pilots it was skull-shatteringly dull, flying around at 4-5,000' (nosebleed territory for any self-respecting helicopter pilot) and stooging at 70kts for maximum endurance for hour after hour after hour. But on this occasion we were doing active ASW, the task for which the Sea King was originally designed. Active ASW in the daytime is enormous fun for the pilots, especially when you are in contact. At night the aircraft flies the profiles for you, closely monitored by the pilots (since you are down at 40', you want to keep a close eye on things in the pitch black; it can be a tad buttock-clenching at night). In the day, however, you generally fly it all yourself ("manual jumps" as the jargon goes) without any assistance from the AFCS (automatic flight control system), and it's a blast. So there you have the scene. I am 18 months into front line flying, and have reached the dizzy heights of being captain of my own crew. My P2 for this trip is a hugely experienced USN exchange pilot (way more experienced than me, but flying as second pilot while he gets up to speed with RN procedures). We do 45 minutes of active Torbay bashing, but then reach the pre-briefed pause while she repositions. Rather than disrupt the flying programme, we simply keep going, so we have taken a plastic milk float with us (hi tech, I tell you) and are doing some grappling training; chuck the milk float out of the back and practice SAR with it - much harder than it sounds, cos the milk float thrashes around in the down wash, so it is great training for the back seat in conning the aircraft and the front seat in hovering it precisely. A few minutes into the grapple work, with Jim the USN guy on the controls, the port engine stops... or so we thought. The Nr (rotor speed) decays as the good engine runs out of puff (too hot and too heavy to hover on one engine) and we subside rapidly onto the water yelling Mayday and punching the windows out. Phil Smith, the Observer, says he had never seen anyone strap in as fast as poor old BJ Sandoe, the Crewman who had been lying on the floor of the aircraft with his head sticking out, conning Jim onto the milk float, when suddenly the Atlantic Ocean came up to greet him. As I reached up to shut down the No 2 engine (cos you sure as heck don't want to abandon a helicopter while the rotors are still turning) it became apparent that the No 1 engine had not in fact failed, but simply run down to flight idle. The fuel computer had developed a fault and tried to shut the throttle, but there is a physical interlock built into the system for precisely this emergency, called the Flight Idle Stop, which is basically a screw jack that prevents the throttle from closing beyond a certain point - the very last thing you do when starting up is to engage it. So we over-rode the computer and managed the throttle manually, the Nr came back up to where it should be and shot off the surface of the sea like a startled rabbit, downgraded our Mayday to a Pan, and flew back to Mum. A Green Endorsement much later (still on the wall of my loo) and very shaky legs for a few hours afterwards. Well, it has to be this cab, doesn't it? So I present to you ZE419 / 014 / R of 820 Naval Air Squadron in July 1988; a bog standard Sea King HAS5. Dark blue (this was just before the days when everything became grey), black markings. Photos of the real aircraft to follow, I expect, but for now she is one of these in the distance (photo taken the day before we sailed from Pompey, so about 2 weeks before the ditching): The aircraft will be built much as in this photo, actually; folded, included the tail, with engine blanks in. The cabs in the photo have tip socks on, but I will probably build mine with the more robust blade support system known as "Forth Road Bridge" gear (as in this Mk 5 at the Fleet Air Arm Museum): The basis of the model will be the Hasegawa 1/48 Sea King, using the "Ark Royal HAR5" [no such thing; it should be HU5] edition (which for some reason Photobucket refuses to rotate, so turn your head): ...and the excellent Flightpath conversion set, which contains all sorts of goodies important to this build - notably weapons carriers, assorted aerials and a tail rotor much better suited to having a gust lock fitted to it. Herewith statutory sprue shot: ...and pic of the contents of Flightpath box and a couple of other aftermarket goodies: As it happens, I also have a Hasegawa AEW2a kit (acquired before the Mk5 kit was released, as the only game in town for a future Mk5 build). This will also be useful, since it contains a number of applicable bits such as Orange Crop ESM aerials (removed from the HU5). And since all the Hasegawa boxings are variations on the same theme, the kit already contains some parts that I will use - e.g. the HU5 has the sand filter in front of the engine intakes, but in my era we simply had the "barn door"; similarly the HU5 has the sonar removed and a blanking plate fitted. The kit contains both a barn door and a (sort of, -ish) sonar. [i also have a second complete "Ark Royal HAR5", designated eventually to be an 819 SAR aircraft... but not yet]. There will not be much progress for a few days, while I get the Vixen over the line.... Herewith photo of the appropriate log book entry (bottom line:
  7. A long time between updates, partially because I went to the US for a couple of weeks . But it's finally done I've written a full build report at my blog for those interested. For those not interested here's some photos
  8. #23/2016 The first of two new opponents is finished. Hasegawa kit with Techmod decals, Gunze and Tamiya acrylics except Azure from Model Master, Eduard seatbelts. The model shows an a/c of the Royal Egyptian Airforce that participated in the Arab-Israel war and was captured by Israeli troops in December 1948.
  9. After the MiG-29 rollout, here´s my dads next jet project. He wanted to build a Phantom for a longer time now. Besides that the subject is related to my mother´s past, how so will be revealed when the model is finished. Gonna use the old Hasegawa kit with either Hi-Decals or CAM Decals.
  10. After Hasegawa 2016 (http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235000783-hasegawa-2016/ - thanks 172flogger) I open a new topic for Hasegawa's 2017 reissues and monthly newsfiles. The first one will be: - ref. 08246 - 1/32nd - Boeing F4B4 - original kit: https://www.scalemates.com/kits/148093-hasegawa-js-066-boeing-f4b-4 Release expected on January 22nd, 2017 Source: http://www.hasegawa-model.co.jp/product/08246/ V.P.
  11. Ritchie's F-4D

    Well, since my Mirage seems to have stallen, I'd thought I'd try this for a change.....a kit bought in 1984. it will be built as Richie''s plane on the morning of his 5th kill. decals will be ancient microscale, with a black box cockpit, aires 'cans and wheel wells and seamless suckers intakes. with some Eduard added for good measure. Some serious thinning on the wing bottom.....I was warned and the same for the wheelwell....paperthin......... Top of the cockpit sides, I cut an L shape out of the edge so it would fit..... Left hand side right hand side Tub, the black marks are where some machining will be done so the nosewheel well will fit. 'burner cans.......must take better pictures, as the bluing doesn't really show up inside of the 'cans
  12. Hi guys, I will build a Mistel I in 1/32 scale. I will use a Revell/Hasegawa Messerschmitt Bf-109 G2 as the leading airplane. For the flying bomb I will use the Revell Junkers Ju-88 A4 kit with the Aims Mistel I conversion set. I think I have some extra's for the Bf-109. I will place some foto's later. Cheers,
  13. The second of my Hasegawa LL200 airliners that I saved from the shelf of doom. The kit sat quite a while there unfinished,no idea why I had put it there instead of finishing it... Well,together with the JAL 747-200,I reworked/repainted some parts and finished it. This was also a complete OOB build,with the decals provided in the kit.Despite their 20+ years already,they were still in fine condition. Hasegawa has made a superb 747-400 kit,accurate in shape and no fitting issues and unlike Revell with their,much bigger ,1/144 kit,also got the wingshape right I really like Hasegawa's LL200 airliner series and while refurbish and finish these 2 kits,I decided to concentrate on my other kits of that range and build or finish a few of them and take a little break from more difficult/time consuming kits. Korean Air's Boeing 747s were a frequent sight at Zurich Airport for a long time,but the daily service is now served by the smaller Airbus A330-200. Jumbos are a very rare sight at our Swiss airports these days On with the photos Cheers,
  14. Hello fellow F-111 fans, My contribution to this long-awaited GB is an F-111D, built from Hasegawa's F-111E boxing, in 1/72 of course. Markings will have to be from aftermarket sources, mainly to help render the different version, but also because the original kit decals for both my F-111E and F-111D/F boxings are sadly in a poor state. Other aftermarket bits and pieces I plan to incorporate are Eduard etch for the cockpit, Eduard canopy masks, a Master pitot and possibly a Pavla canopy. Enough about the 'plan', here are some pictures: Hasegawa F-111E by Andrew, on Flickr Instructions, etch, mask, canopy by Andrew, on Flickr More sprues by Andrew, on Flickr Wings, fuselage, canopy by Andrew, on Flickr Fwd fuselage, intakes by Andrew, on Flickr I've (sort of) cleaned the bench and will make a start very soon - maybe tomorrow night, which is close enough to 1st of April for me... cheers, Andrew.
  15. Sufa and Brakeet

    I started a Hasegawa F-16I Sufa in the middle of the Auto TF build as a target of opportunity during a road trip. This is the kit: The major assemblies have been completed (see the Auto TF WIP) and the airframe primed. Some AGM-142s and data link pods from the Skunk Works IDF weapons set in the process of painting. Still need touching up and decals. The airframe spent most of today in the spray booth. Next will be painting the various antenna and trying to smooth out the camo finish. I figured so long as I’m doing an IDF camo, then I should get the Brakeet F-16D out as well. This one has been sitting in the stash for a long time. Hasegawa hadn’t moved into the Block 40 and beyond variants at the time they issued this one. The kit came with a resin spine and some resin antenna. When I first tried using CA to attach the spine, the fairing just popped right off. I’m thinking that bottle of CA was getting too old as it has been taking a long time to set. Out with a new bottle of CA and I drilled out holes along the spine. I spot glued the resin fairing to the upper fuselage and then added more CA through the holes and clamped the assembly. This time it stayed put and I added the separate resin ECM fairing at the tail end. The ECM section isn’t as deep as the aft end of the resin spine, so some sanding is in order. Hasegawa gives only the full F-16C/D tail, so the upper portion of the vertical tail was cut away from the base fairing and secured to the resin spine with pins and CA. Thanks for looking, Sven
  16. While looking through my stash for something,I found the Hasegawa Boeing 747 kit that I started some time ago but never finished...I had somehow forgotten about this project and also another Hasegawa Boeing 747-400 that had been partially started and then ended up on the shelf of doom So,my actual builds were set aside and I decided to finish this kit first as well as the 747-400. As I said in my previous thread on the Hasegawa Boeing 767,the Hasegawa LL200 airliner series was a fantastic collection to get. Beautiful schemes,nice kits that build up in no time and a great selection of classic airliners.Sadly that Hasegawa almost went down to zero with their LL200 airliner range,so many of them became sought after collectors items. This one is an updated version of the 1989 release of their Japan Airlines Boeing 747-200,in the then new colour scheme of JAL. Here they added an extra decal sheet with the motives for the "Super Resort Express".This kit was issued back in 1994. Japan Airlines repainted some of their 747s and DC-10-40s in the "Super Resort Express" scheme for their Tokyo-Honolulu service. All of them had these birds and flowers,although in different colors. Hasegawa released a few of them as well,among the 747-200 were also the 747-300 and the DC-10-40. Despite its age,the decals still looked good and went on well,not always the case when dealing with Hasegawa decals...although I airbrushed the grey/red cheatline instead of using the decals as I found the color pretty much off compared to the original. The windows were sealed with Kristal Klear...an endless task on a 747... Painted with my usual Revell and Testors enamels and this time sealed with a spray thats actually meant for protecting photos or self printed DVD/Blu-Ray discs.It protects the surface from yellowing and is scratch resistant. It sets very nicely and dries within 3 minutes. I will use this sealer spray from now on on my future builds instead of laquer. I hope you like the Jumbo (next up in my "restoration from the shelf of doom" program will be the Hasegawa Boeing 747-400 Korean Airlines) Cheers,
  17. This was a sideproject that I had built on and off between other builds for over a year. The Hasegawa LL200 airliner series contained many popular airliners such as the Boeing 747 in almost every version,DC-10,MD-11,DC-9 and among many others,the Boeing 767. Sadly,most of these airliners from this famous series are no longer produced by Hasegawa and also the 767-200 is unlikely to appear again as Hasegawa modified the molds for the 767-300 which is still available. These models are very accurate and easy to build and in their 1/200 scale also not too big and vitrine friendly. My Hasegawa 767-200 kit was actually the Japan Airlines issue,but I once bought a larger number of decal sets for Hasegawa airliners on ebay,among them this nice Delta Airlines set. It was in pretty good condition despite its age,research showed that the original Delta 767-200 kit was released back in 1982. Some small details such as the cockpit windows come from a newer Boeing 777 Hasegawa set and the coroguard panels are from a detail set.Apart from that its completely OOB built. Paints are the usual Revell and Testors enamels,the whole model was then sealed with MicroScale Gloss clear. The Boeing 767-200 in the depicted "Spirit of Delta" scheme can be seen at the Delta heritage museum in Atlanta where it is preserved. Enjoy
  18. H8K2 Emily Photo Etch 1:72 Eduard Announced last year, Hasegawa's all-knew Emily seems to be quite a mysterious beast. The teaser pictures (see the thread in the Rumourmonger forum) look excellent, but I haven't seen one appear in the Ready for Inspection forum, and the kit doesn't even seem to be available from most of the better know UK-based model retailers. I managed to find one availble from a UK seller on ebay, but so high was the price that Paypal Credit was offered as one of the options to purchase! Nevertheless, Eduard have decided that the new flying boat will sell in sufficient quantities worldwide to justify the produciton of a veritable slew of photo etched detail parts. H8K2 Emily Cockpit Interior There are three sets for the interior of the aircraft. First up is the cockpit set. In the usual Eduard style, this includes both pre-painted and unpainted parts. Included on the fret of painted parts is a new multi-layered instrument panel, a multitude of parts for the sidewalls and harnesses for the pilot and co-pilots seat. On the unpainted fret are complete replacement seats, a new cockpit floor, rudder pedals, more details for the sidewalls and bulkheads, as well as the ladders that leads from the flight deck to the interior of the aircraft amd to the observation bubble atop the cockpit. H8K2 Emily Nose Interior A seperate set caters for the extreme forward part of the fuselage. Parts are included to cover the main bulkhead that seperates the nose from the rest of the aircraft, we asll as a nifty door which can be posed in the open or closed position. An access door to the outside of the aircraft is also included, which will enable the modeller to show off a little more of the exquisite detail. Coverings for the floor surfaces are included, as well as lots of details for the sidewalls and the nose gun. H8K2 Emily Rear Interior This set includes details for the mid-rear part of the fuselage. Included on the fret is a door for the bulkhead, replacement coverings for the floor, as well as the raised structure directly underneath the turret. A host of smaller details for the sidewalls are also included on the fret. Details for the upper turret and side blisters, including parts for the machine guns and seats for the gunners are also on the fret. H8K2 Emily Exterior The single large fret contains the ignition wiring for the engine, as well as frames for all of the many windows on the outside of the airframe. Also on the fret are replacement hinges for the aelerons, the use of which will necessitate removing the kit parts. There is some seriously nice detail for the landing gear/beaching assembly, as well as parts for the nose radar antennas and smaller details for the bombs and torpedos. H8K2 Emily Maintenance Platforms If you bought Eduard's sets for the Italeri Short Sunderland, then you'll be familiar with this set. Two unpainted frets are included, which together hold parts for two maintenance platforms per engine. The platforms themselves fold down from cavities in the leading edge of the wing, and inlcude steps are restrining cables. They will certainly add something different to the finished model and I for one think they look excellent. Conclusion If you've given in to temptation and splashed out on Hasegawa's fine new kit, then you probably won't think too much of extending your investment to include some aftermarket details. Together, these sets include pretty much everything you could want in order to super-detail the new kit. Overall this set is up to Eduard's usual high standards and can therefore be recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  19. Hi Everyone I present to you a VFA-143 inflight display from the 2006/2007 cruise. Aftermarket bits used were fightertown decals, aires ejection seat, two mikes seamless intakes and attack squadron GBU-38's. Had a bit of difficulty strapping the pilot into the seat using the PE but I'm pleased with how it turned out. Painted using Mr Hobby and Tamiya paint and weathered with oils and powders. Will take some better photos when the sun is out!
  20. Latest addition is Hasegawa excellent 1/72 eurofighter typhoon of IX Squadron Royal Air Force. Per noctem volamus or There's always bloody something.. http:// http:// http:// http:// http:// http://
  21. All right then, time to get started! My project for this group build is the Grumman/General Dynamics F-111B. I suspect that everyone knows the story of this aircraft and its development, but if not I'll direct you to the mother-lode of F-111B information later on in this post. My initial idea is to model one of the Phoenix missile test aircraft, and BuNo 151972 seems a good candidate. This, of course, will be a conversion and my base kit will be the Hasegawa 1:72 RAAF F-111C/G. This is a great kit, and contains all necessary parts to build either the C or G model. The G is essentially the same as the FB-111 as you know. Let's see what we get (and it's so much that it's difficult to close the box without squeezing the contents). First, the specific kit I'm using: Inside we find a lot of styrene! This next photo may look like two copies of the same sprue, but they are different - one is sprue C and the other sprue D. The difference is primarily with respect to the intakes as the F-111C and G had variations in this area (Triple Plow I vs. Triple Plow II). Since 151972 did not have either of these intakes, I will be modifying the Triple Plow I. And the rest: And finally two of these babies: I've acquired several bits of aftermarket goodies to help with this conversion, starting with the set from Pete's Hangar which unfortunately is no longer available. My understanding is that this set has a few problems, but they don't look to be insurmountable. Apparently, the shape of the nose, and its demarcation with the fuselage, is not quite right, but that's why they call it modelling. Some additional decal sheets that may be of help - the sheet from Pete's Hangar is also pictured here, but the other two sheets are from Microscale and are quite old. 72-132 includes the markings for 151972, and 72-452 includes stenciling for the early models of the F-111. Also shown here is the sheet from the kit, not sure if any of this will be used. The Phoenix testing logo is different between the Microscale and Pete's sheets, and based on photographs it looks like Microscale is better (for instance, Pete's omits the fire that the Phoenix bird is emerging from, the USMC globe and USN anchor). I hope those old Microscale sheets are still good! Some additional aftermarket that may be used. Obviously, not all of the photoetch for the F-111D/F is appropriate, but some of it may be useful. We'll see. The masks are fine, but what's this with the ejection seats for a B-57 Canberra? The F-111 had a ejection capsule! Well, yes it did, after a fashion. However, the first three F-111B prototypes, including 151972, did not have the capsule, and were instead fitted with Douglas Escapac ejection seats. According to the Ejection Site, they were model 1C. The resin seats from Pavla are models 1C-6, and have the right basic shape. But I suspect they will need some alteration or enhancement before the end of the day. Finally, the old Revell kit from 1966 will also be used, as it contains a lot of parts that will help, like the knife edge boat tail, aft fuselage bullet fairings (speed bumps as they were called), etc. I picked this up at a model show, and although it's been started (the B/C/FB long wing tips have been glued to the wings) that won't be a problem as I won't be using them. This is one of the few kits produced which claimed to be a B model. Like a lot of kits from the 60s, this one came out while the aircraft was still being developed, and contains several issues. But I think it will come in handy nonetheless. The loose parts, rolling around in the box: And the ones still clinging to the runners: Also in the box were these four pylons, which I suspect are from an F/A-18. But they have a shape resemblance (kind of) to the pylons used by 151972 for the Phoenix missiles. I will be checking if they are close to being the right size, and might work for the model. Again, we'll see. Perhaps they can be modified, maybe not. But it was nice of the chap who sold this to me to include them! The Phoenix missiles will probably be sourced from a Hasegawa F-14A kit, but will need some mods to represent the missiles used in the F-111B test program. Now, about that mother-lode. If you're going to build an F-111B, you simply have to have this monograph: Tommy is the F-111B subject matter expert, and he contributes regularly to Britmodeller. I expect he will show up here to keep me on the straight and moral path. If you follow this link, you'll go to Tommy's blog where he has posted several links to articles that concern the F-111B. There are also instructions for how to obtain the amendments and errata for the F-111B monograph. All of this material taken together remains the prime reference for this much-maligned bird. Cheers, Bill
  22. Hi everybody; after a couple of propeller builds, here I am back to a jet, and in 1/72! A few words to introduce this project: almost one year ago, I started the build of a Hasegawa 1/72 F-4 J Phantom II, this one: It was my first serious venture in 1/72 scale, and was a lot of fun. I learnt a lot from all the people who followed that WIP, and one in particular is Gene K; former USAF F4 pilot, he has been very helpful both in terms of technical info on the AC and in terms of modelling tips. Long story short, we became friends an I offered him, as a sort of way to thank him for the great help and as a tribute to his career, to build a model of one of the F4-s he has actually flown. He suggested the subject of this build, and not only that: he has actually donated me the two kits I'll be using for this, plus a lot of extras. Basically, following Gene's guidance, I'm going to modify an F-4 J Hase kit to become an F-4C, with the addition of parts coming from the greatly detailed MONOGRAM kit and a few aftermarkets (and some scratch building, of course ). This thread is going to be co-hosted together with Gene, and we'll go into more details in the next few posts. For now, what I have is: a completely cleared workbench (that is something totally new for me ) the kits Hasegawa parts to be added/modified: Nose sensor Stabs Seamless intakes, Gene's patented method Monogram parts: Tanks, pilons, gunpod etc Speed brakes and arrest hook Cockpit (amazing detail for a 1/72 injected kit!!!) Pilots!! One half fuselage has already been "treated" by Gene prior to sending me the kits, as an example to follow. He has also noted indications on the kit plastic Aftermarkets: Specific decals Stencils; these have been donated by another friend, Silvano (Phantom61 here on BM) AC Profile and most important thing: Now Gene will go into more detail about the project and the aircraft. Enjoy! Ciao
  23. Kit – Hasegawa 1:32 (original issue) Paint – Tamiya acrylics & AK Xtreme Metals Decals – Kagero Extras – Barracuda resin wheels, Eduard pre-painted etch seatbelts Republic P-47D-30 Thunderbolt Assigned to Lt. Frank Middleton 65th FS, 57th FG Corsica, mid-1944 An impulse build after the 1:48 Airfix Spitfire from a month or so ago. Five weeks from cracking the box to what you see here – and yes I know I haven’t painted the sway braces on the pylons and centreline yet. As usual with Hasegawa’s BIG kits it simply fell together without any fuss whatsoever, I was expecting ‘issues’ with the multi-piece cowl, but it behaved impeccably. The huge take-away from this build is the incredible quality of AK’s enamel lacquer’s. So much better behaved than Alclad and nowhere near as ‘smelly’. First time using Kagero’s decals and they worked perfectly also. Not much else to say, my first 1:32 completion in a l-o-n-g time and enjoyed so much I dragged-out my H’gawa 109G-14 as a possible next project… Thanks for taking the time to look folks and please feel free to ask any questions or make any comments or criticism. Ian.
  24. I know I haven't finished the Luchs yet but I picked this wee beastie up at Telford, liked the box art, and parted with very few readies (cheap I tells ya) 'Oooo zimmerit!' I thought..... Suppose I should have checked before jumping to conclusions Sprue shot with holes because... I did a bit No sign of zimmerit So... do I go nuts and manually, yes, by hand, apply scale zimmerit coat to this.. er... very small, big cat. Have to say I've also been eying up the moulded in tools too I wonder if there are better tracks for it Or.. and this is where I could do with some input, should I go strictly OOB to see what I can make of a basic kit with glue and a lick o' paint? Ooooh input! That's one for you Johnny boy Fixit Phil P.S. Why do I never see the spelling mistakes BEFORE I submit the post?
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