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Found 482 results

  1. I've had this in the stash for a little while now: Here are the main sprues, there are two sets of these: Clear parts, the resin replacement forward engine section for the F2A-3 variant, instructions and decals: I'll be using the resin nose and building the USMC aircraft shown on the box cover, MF-15 of the Marine's VMF-221 squadron which was flown by Captain William Humberd in defence of Midway Island on 4th June 1942 in the course of which he claimed a Zero and a Kate destroyed and a second Kate as damaged. VMF-221's losses were terrible as their F2A-3's were underpowered, overweight and lacking in manoeuverability compared to the Zeroes that they faced. Most of the Marine pilots had little or no combat experience, but Captain Humberd survived the day and was awarded the Navy Cross; I haven't been able to find any reference to his subsequent career or later life. I was quite tempted to build the other box-art aircraft as I believe it was flown by Jimmy Thach and I have already built an Airfix Wildcat in the markings of the aircraft he flew, but I wanted to build a Dutch ML-KNIL (Royal Netherlands East Indies Air Force) - I had originally bought the Special Hobby boxing for this purpose: ...but having read that it is something of a challenging build (this being the politest way I can think of putting it) I chickened out; Bill 'Navy Bird' built a really lovely RAAF Buffalo I from the basically same kit, but I am no Navy Bird... I shall keep the kit and perhaps one day will be man enough to take it on, but in the meantime I will use some of the transfers to complete the second Hasegawa kit as a B-339C No.3100 as flown by Lt. August 'Guus' Diebel of 2-VLG-V based in Java in early December 1941. This unit was later moved to Singapore where the Dutch B-339's flew alongside the RAF and RAAF Buffaloes. Lt. Diebel claimed 2 Nate fighters in a Japanese raid on Singapore on 12th January 1942, though he was subsequently wounded and forced to bail out. He survived the war with three credited kills and in 1948 was awarded the Military William Order (the highest honour awarded by the Netherlands) but died in 1951 when the Gloster Meteor he was flying crashed at Uithuizen in the Netherlands. The aircraft in question is the top one shown on the back of the box: To build the kit as a B-339 I will need to replace the naval tailcone with the land-based version featuring a larger tailwheel - this is not provided by the kit but at some point I had bought the Quickboost replacement along with a couple of Eduard mask sets - good work, Past Me, your foresight is appreciated: The paint scheme for the USMC F2A-3 is USN Blue Gray over USN Light Gray, the interior will be Bronze Green, all by Sovereign Hobbies Colourcoats: For the Dutch aircraft the scheme was Oudblad (old leaf) and Jongblad (young leaf) with Aluminium-painted undersides. If I understand correctly Oudblad and Jongblad were Olive Drab 41 and what would become Medium Green 42 but I can't swear to it - fortunately for me Jamie of Sovereign Hobbies is a near-neighbour of my folks up in Aberdeen and some time ago as a result of some persistent wheedling, cajoling, whining and snivelling he got me a couple of samples of the colours in question: Close to a brownish OD and Medium Green, as it happens. These colours and the European Dutch LVA colours are not currently available but I think Sovereign will get a new batch made up at some point in the future. As noted above, the F2A-3 kit has a resin extended lenght nose to represent the 10-inch extension added to this variant to include additional fuel tankage... this requires some surgery to some of the kit parts, which I shall start with as if I am given the opportunity to mess something up I will usually take it and if I am to ruin everything I would rather do so before I have invested too much time and effort into the rest of the kit... Sorry for all the blurb and congratulations if you have made it this far Cheers, Stew
  2. I’m hoping to do a few F-16s from The Air Force Flight Test Center at Edwards AFB. The first will be this F-16B. Done as the Automatic Terrain Following test bird from the LANTIRN Test Force I’ll be using some home made decals for the tail markings (middle left): At some point I’ll do the “Bozo Fleet” (test support aircraft) markings as depicted in the Hasegawa kit, but I’ve yet to find a clear coat that does not yellow over time. Sven Old Viper Tester
  3. As my ludicrously long Sea Vixen build finally shows signs of drawing to a close, thoughts turn to what to build next. I always try to have two things on the go at any one time, with the other being my never-ending Ark Royal build - but there is a limit to how much 1/350 scratch building and detailing I can stand at any one time, and I need to have something in 1/48 (my aircraft scale of choice) to keep me going. I thought about a twin Buccaneer build - an Anti-Flash White S1 and an Ark Royal (4) final commission S2D. Those will come at some point, since I have the kits and the necessary conversion materials. But watching the splendid work of Steve (Fritag), Debs (Ascoteer) and others has convinced me that it is high time I built something that I actually flew myself. Sea King or Lynx, Sea King or Lynx... much indecision was finally tilted towards the Queen of the Skies by all the press coverage of its retirement from RN SAR service earlier this year (though the ASaC7 Baggers will soldier on for a while yet), and by markdipXV711's excellent build of an 819 SAR cab which he and I flew in together 20-odd years ago. So, since 819 (my other Sea King squadron) has just been done, I have finally plumped for an aircraft from my first tour. Pull up a bollard and listen to a true dit. 820 Naval Air Squadron, 1988, 18 months into my first front-line tour. We were part of Ark Royal (5)'s CAG (carrier air group) throughout my time on the Squadron, and in July 1988 the ship plus 801 (8 x Sea Harrier FRS1), 849B Flight (3 x Sea King AEW2), a detachment from 845 (2 x Sea King HC4) and 820 (9 x Sea King HAS5) set off for Australia, via Malta, Singapore, Hong Kong, Brunei and Subic Bay (Philippines), and home via Mumbai and Gibraltar. 6 months away, and a bloody good time was had by all... Less than 2 weeks after we sailed, we were taking part in a NATO exercise in the approaches to the Med; basically we were playing the bad guys trying to force a passage through the straits, and a number of RN, USN and Spanish units were trying to stop us... including HM Submarines Torbay, Otter and Opportune. The aim of these exercises is not to be 100% realistic, but to make sure that there is maximum interaction, so occasionally there would be a 2 hour pause where the submarines, having come right inside the screen and "attacked" the hell out of the ships, would withdraw 30 miles and start again. We would knock off tracking them and leave them alone to reposition. In those long distant 1980s Cold War days, ASW was our bread and butter, and on the whole we were pretty good at it. Most of the time we did passive ASW - chucking huge quantities of sonobuoys out of the aircraft and finding submarines that way, often working with our Nimrod and P3C brethren, and often working against USSR boats rather than friendly exercise ones. In my first few weeks on the squadron we rippled 3 (3 cabs airborne 24/7) all the way from Norfolk VA to Harstad in Norway, including several days of tracking 2 Victor IIIs that were taking an interest in our games. It was pretty exhausting, but we could keep it up almost indefinitely. For the guys in the back, passive ASW was often good fun; 3-dimensional chess, and all that. But for the pilots it was skull-shatteringly dull, flying around at 4-5,000' (nosebleed territory for any self-respecting helicopter pilot) and stooging at 70kts for maximum endurance for hour after hour after hour. But on this occasion we were doing active ASW, the task for which the Sea King was originally designed. Active ASW in the daytime is enormous fun for the pilots, especially when you are in contact. At night the aircraft flies the profiles for you, closely monitored by the pilots (since you are down at 40', you want to keep a close eye on things in the pitch black; it can be a tad buttock-clenching at night). In the day, however, you generally fly it all yourself ("manual jumps" as the jargon goes) without any assistance from the AFCS (automatic flight control system), and it's a blast. So there you have the scene. I am 18 months into front line flying, and have reached the dizzy heights of being captain of my own crew. My P2 for this trip is a hugely experienced USN exchange pilot (way more experienced than me, but flying as second pilot while he gets up to speed with RN procedures). We do 45 minutes of active Torbay bashing, but then reach the pre-briefed pause while she repositions. Rather than disrupt the flying programme, we simply keep going, so we have taken a plastic milk float with us (hi tech, I tell you) and are doing some grappling training; chuck the milk float out of the back and practice SAR with it - much harder than it sounds, cos the milk float thrashes around in the down wash, so it is great training for the back seat in conning the aircraft and the front seat in hovering it precisely. A few minutes into the grapple work, with Jim the USN guy on the controls, the port engine stops... or so we thought. The Nr (rotor speed) decays as the good engine runs out of puff (too hot and too heavy to hover on one engine) and we subside rapidly onto the water yelling Mayday and punching the windows out. Phil Smith, the Observer, says he had never seen anyone strap in as fast as poor old BJ Sandoe, the Crewman who had been lying on the floor of the aircraft with his head sticking out, conning Jim onto the milk float, when suddenly the Atlantic Ocean came up to greet him. As I reached up to shut down the No 2 engine (cos you sure as heck don't want to abandon a helicopter while the rotors are still turning) it became apparent that the No 1 engine had not in fact failed, but simply run down to flight idle. The fuel computer had developed a fault and tried to shut the throttle, but there is a physical interlock built into the system for precisely this emergency, called the Flight Idle Stop, which is basically a screw jack that prevents the throttle from closing beyond a certain point - the very last thing you do when starting up is to engage it. So we over-rode the computer and managed the throttle manually, the Nr came back up to where it should be and shot off the surface of the sea like a startled rabbit, downgraded our Mayday to a Pan, and flew back to Mum. A Green Endorsement much later (still on the wall of my loo) and very shaky legs for a few hours afterwards. Well, it has to be this cab, doesn't it? So I present to you ZE419 / 014 / R of 820 Naval Air Squadron in July 1988; a bog standard Sea King HAS5. Dark blue (this was just before the days when everything became grey), black markings. Photos of the real aircraft to follow, I expect, but for now she is one of these in the distance (photo taken the day before we sailed from Pompey, so about 2 weeks before the ditching): The aircraft will be built much as in this photo, actually; folded, included the tail, with engine blanks in. The cabs in the photo have tip socks on, but I will probably build mine with the more robust blade support system known as "Forth Road Bridge" gear (as in this Mk 5 at the Fleet Air Arm Museum): The basis of the model will be the Hasegawa 1/48 Sea King, using the "Ark Royal HAR5" [no such thing; it should be HU5] edition (which for some reason Photobucket refuses to rotate, so turn your head): ...and the excellent Flightpath conversion set, which contains all sorts of goodies important to this build - notably weapons carriers, assorted aerials and a tail rotor much better suited to having a gust lock fitted to it. Herewith statutory sprue shot: ...and pic of the contents of Flightpath box and a couple of other aftermarket goodies: As it happens, I also have a Hasegawa AEW2a kit (acquired before the Mk5 kit was released, as the only game in town for a future Mk5 build). This will also be useful, since it contains a number of applicable bits such as Orange Crop ESM aerials (removed from the HU5). And since all the Hasegawa boxings are variations on the same theme, the kit already contains some parts that I will use - e.g. the HU5 has the sand filter in front of the engine intakes, but in my era we simply had the "barn door"; similarly the HU5 has the sonar removed and a blanking plate fitted. The kit contains both a barn door and a (sort of, -ish) sonar. [i also have a second complete "Ark Royal HAR5", designated eventually to be an 819 SAR aircraft... but not yet]. There will not be much progress for a few days, while I get the Vixen over the line.... Herewith photo of the appropriate log book entry (bottom line:
  4. Will be building this kit As the F-16D Digital Flight Control System (DFLCS) test jet With home-made tail markings lower middle on the sheet Sven Old Viper Tester
  5. Hello gang. I saw this kit at 50% discount at the LHS today and immediately thought of this GB. I believe this is one of the earliest boxings of Hasegawa's F-16 line. It represents a block 15 aircraft, and comes with three decal options. Two Wolfpack squadron machines from Korea, and one Dutch with 311 sqn. None of the marking options are particularly interesting, and the decals look iffy (flat with glossy bits), but a stroll through the interwebs showed little in the way of alternatives. So Dutch F-16 it is! This build will be OOB save for seatbelts. This kit doesn't have the finesse of the Tamiya F-16, but I have a soft spot for kits from the 1980s, as that is what I grew up on. I never built this model in the 1980s, but a friend had it, and I always loved the boarding ladder and recessed panels (my Monogram F-16 had raised lines ) Work begins tomorrow. And you can bet I'll be including the boarding ladder!
  6. I know I haven't finished the Luchs yet but I picked this wee beastie up at Telford, liked the box art, and parted with very few readies (cheap I tells ya) 'Oooo zimmerit!' I thought..... Suppose I should have checked before jumping to conclusions Sprue shot with holes because... I did a bit No sign of zimmerit So... do I go nuts and manually, yes, by hand, apply scale zimmerit coat to this.. er... very small, big cat. Have to say I've also been eying up the moulded in tools too I wonder if there are better tracks for it Or.. and this is where I could do with some input, should I go strictly OOB to see what I can make of a basic kit with glue and a lick o' paint? Ooooh input! That's one for you Johnny boy Fixit Phil P.S. Why do I never see the spelling mistakes BEFORE I submit the post?
  7. Hello Chaps, It's been a while since I posted anything, but this is because my wife and I moved to a new home that we bought. With all the packing, moving, unpacking and settling in, time went by fast....6 months to be precise before I touched styrene again. Well, since the move, I still haven't found the time to create my new man-cave/modeling den in the basement, which means that airbrushing is a no go, and so, because I was getting severe withdrawals, I decided to try my hand at brush-painting some 1/72 scale kits in my stash. I chose to do 1/72 rather than my normal 1/32 or 1/48 scale for a good reason- if I screwed up with the "Hairy-Sticks", I wouldn't be too bothered about messing up a smaller and cheaper kit. Since November, I've managed to complete five 1/72 scale kits and one 1/144 scale kit and I have to say, I've had fun painting them the "old fashioned" way, I used Model Master acrylics and then oils for the weathering stage. So, I'd like to share the first of those 6 builds and apologize for not having/finding the time to post a build log prior to this RFI post. I hope you like it...I was happy with my "Hairy Stick" results: Although I much prefer to build the larger scale kits, purely for comfort on my aging eyes and much prefer to use an airbrush, I did have fun and this was a decent little kit. If you'd like to watch my YouTube video for this, then here is the link to that: Thanks in advance for any comments made, much appreciated! Cheers, Martin
  8. Hello Britmodellers; here's my new project, the probably well known 1 72 Hasegawa F4-J Phantom II. I'm moving out of my comfort zone here, as I normally build in 1 48 scale, but I got this kit at bargain price and I decided (after a very challenging RE2002 from Italeri) to try with this. I intended to build this OOB, but then I got tempted along the way ... and I ordered the Eduard Pre-painted zoom set for the cockpit (hasn't arrived yet). Plus I sourced an old Eduard PE detail set at my local shop (sorry, forgot to take pics before starting cutting out pieces..) So I started with a quick dry-fit of the main parts: Fit is pretty good, a breath of fresh air compared to my previous build ... Probably a couple of tricky points from what I can see now: main fuselage to wings join and main air intakes to fuselage. Then it was time for som PE parts: first of all the speed brakes The moving part is made of two pieces, and you have to conform it to the kit parts before proceeding Then I removed the corresponding section on the wings The third PE part (sorry, I wouldn't know how to call this in English): Other side, this shows a bit how I did it I've also added some PE details in the wheel bay area Tail chute cover PE detail Next, it was time to start gluing the fuselage main section; I've added a reference tab to the lower part, to allow for a better alignment ..which turned out to be useless, as I had to enlarge the first pin hole towards the front (you see the corresponding pin on the above pic, top right corner) to have a good fit, so the tab isn't touching the opposite fuselage half. Gluing this per sections, trying to achieve a stronger adhesion: That's it for now. Comments, suggestions and any kind of tips are more then welcome. Ciao
  9. Hey guys, this is jut a small a update to my build for the last P-51D group build. I did not get it done in time, so I will continue here. This is the initial post: Hasegawa P-51D "Mustang" 1/48 group build Time for modelling is unfortunately limited, sorry for not getting it managed to make some in press pictures. The build is complete and I had to think about the paint theme. I decided to go with a very attractive blue nose, called "Nancy-Lee". Source: www.americanairmuseum.com Once again Life Like Decals provides everything we need. the decals are tricky to use. Once applied, the look is good, but I wouldn´t recommend them. the paint job was done with Revell Aqua Color, Silver and "lufthansa blue". I have used Tamiya tape for masking the nose and I am pretty happy how she came out. I tried to give some panels a different shade of silver with Oil filtering. It is not easy to make some good pictures to show this effect. The wheels provided by Hasegawa look really great, first stage of painting. Please visit my Blog for more builds. Pete´s mancave Thanks for looking Pete
  10. Hello everybody, here is my try at Hasegawa P-51C. Built almost OOB, with addition of Quickboost exhausts. Painted with Gunze Aluminium and Red, wash is Tamiya, and exhaust stains and dirt a combination of Tamiya smoke and Tamiya D weathering set. Decals are combination of Revell (national insignia, yellow bands and stencils) and Tally Ho. Tally Ho decals acted terribly, resisting every attempt to get them from backing paper. Thanks for looking!
  11. Hasegawa's F-4s have been around for a while now, but I think they are still beautiful kits. I'm building mine with an Aires cockpit and exhaust set. I also have a Wolfpack nose correction set for the EJ variant. I'm still undecided on the color scheme. Tempted to finish it as a colorful 'Okinawa Phantom', but it might end up as a simple low viz bird. I really enjoyed working on the Aires pit. This is my first resin cokcpit set. Painted with Tamiya acrylics followed by an dark oil wash. Unfortunately most of this will be hidden once in place. Exhausts More to come (hopefully). Thanks for looking.
  12. Kit - Hasegawa 1:48 Paint - All enamels Decals - Aeromaster & kit Extras - Ultracast resin seat. All major markings masked & sprayed. Mitsubishi A6M3 'Zero' Tainan Air Group Late 1942 Believe it or not, I started this way back in 2008 and almost immediately it took-up residence on the 'Shelf of Forgetfulness' until I rediscovered it a couple of weeks back. Please feel free to make any criticism, comment or ask any questions - before anyone posts it, I KNOW when I took the pics I hadn't painted the exhausts under the cowl - they're done now !! AFN Ian.
  13. After Hasegawa 2016 (http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235000783-hasegawa-2016/ - thanks 172flogger) I open a new topic for Hasegawa's 2017 reissues and monthly newsfiles. The first one will be: - ref. 08246 - 1/32nd - Boeing F4B4 - original kit: https://www.scalemates.com/kits/148093-hasegawa-js-066-boeing-f4b-4 Release expected on January 22nd, 2017 Source: http://www.hasegawa-model.co.jp/product/08246/ V.P.
  14. Hi all, Here is my latest build - the Hasegawa 1/24 Porsche 962. A fun little build, this kit was re-released midway through last year. I finished it as the Omron 962 Vern Schuppan ran with great success in Japan in 1989. This is chassis 962-008, which was earlier in life a factory Rothmans car and the red/yellow Shell/Dunlop car the Andrettis drove at Le Mans in 1988. I used Tamiya lacquers for the paintwork and acrylics for the weathering. I used a little "artistic license" with the paintwork. As always, comments and critiques are very welcome. Thanks for looking, Jake
  15. Hi, I have a Hasegawa Blue Angels F-4J kit I shall be coverting to an F-4D. I have a proper F-4D kit in the stash as well but I want to have this kit out of the way because of the blue plastic (dunno why) I'll need to reproduce the under nose sensor somehow as well as the intake trunking. The plastic cup with 'intake' on the lid contains all the necessary parts I hope - mostly thin plastic card I have prepared a couple of years ago. I'll be finishing this Phantom in USAF 49th TFW markings - which features an HO tail code and a TAC badge. And yes HO stands for Holloman AFB, NM, however this unit was distinctly also assigned to USAFE (the only unit within TAC to be encumbered this way) and had specific infrastructure, including TAB-V shelters, in place at Hahn and Ramstein air bases to deal with the yearly influx of people and planes - in effect, the 'Crested Cap' deployments were mass migrations to Hahn and Ramstein as part of the Reforger exercises. The Wing deployed up to 1977 when the F-4Ds were replaced by F-15s, after which the Crested Caps were taken over by the 4th TFW. Some aircraft would usually remain in Europe during summer and autumn while air and ground crews would be rotated. I have my eye on a 1976 example, when Phantoms regularly appeared with white stencils on the darker camouflage, much like this one: Jay
  16. Starting with this kit, bought for 3 quid from SMW 2010. And planning to complete as Israeli AF livery. No decals other than leftover insignias from Phantoms and Eagles - so very DIY.
  17. So I guess I should get a move on this GB... I want to have something done by the end. I'm doing a Hasegawa 1/72 Mitsubishi F-2A and I'm going to use a F-16 resin set from Modern Hobbies. The Hasegawa kit is originally from 1998 apparently, but this boxing (the white box) came out in 2003. Not much to say... it looks a bit nicer than their F-16 releases, which I'm a big fan of. So here's a parts' breakdown... it also comes with a lavish arms sprue. What I wanted to highlight is the Modern Hobbies set. I can't go on enough about it... a resin set mastered by Greg Williams, who is an impressive modeller in his own right. I've used his products a number of times, and I have never been dissatisfied.... except with the fact that I didn't discover them sooner. Now the F-16 Set is not a perfect match both in accuracy and fit for this kit... but its pretty close. I asked greg what he thought and he made a couple of really useful diagrams for me when he sent the set. Here's an example. So what is the F-2? its actually a derivative design of the F-16 based on the Agile Falcon concept that emerged in the 1980s. Although F-16 originally emerged as the "low" part of the tactical fighter mix with the "high" F-15, the basic design was seen as being very adaptable. Early on you saw the F-16XL, a cranked delta that would compete and lose against the F-15E as a large strike aircraft to replace the F-111. AgileFalcon was seen as a direct competitor to the F-15C or even a low cost F-22/23 alternative. General Dynamics would increase the wing area, beef up the airframe, install a more powerful engine (Pratt and Whitney F100-PW 229 or GE F110-129, that would be installed on the Block 50/52), and markedly improve the avionics. Unsurprisingly the proposal did not elicit much interest, and much of the technology was incorporated into the F-16 Block 40 and 50. Events would conspire in Japan to give the Agile Falcon concept new life. The JASDF wanted to replace its indigenously produced F-1 strike aircraft, with a new indigenously produced fighter. The FS-X program would be an highly advanced multirole aircraft that would first replace the F-1, then the F-4 and eventually the F-15. However there was a number of issues. First that this was a massive technological undertaking that was not likely to come anywhere close to the budget. Furthermore while the F-1 was indigenously produced, it was by no means a world beater in terms of technology and design, akin to the trainer/light attack Anglo-French Jaguar. In the United States you saw increasing disquiet with the Japanese efforts, so a lobbying effort launched to dissuade them from pursuing the FS-X program and select an American alternative. Without going too in depth, they were successful and Mitsubishi and GD/LM partnered together to build the F-2. Anyway, that's a short history... I'll go a bit more into it while I build, and maybe come March I'll add a few photos of the actual aircraft... we'll see.
  18. Good morning, Britmodellers! Finally finished Hasegawa F/A-18F Super Hornet in 1/48 scale with Eduard BigED and Fightertown decals This bird took me about 3 months, but the result is ok for me! Enjoy the pics, constructive criticism is welcome! Regards, Oliver.
  19. Hi folks, I've decided for my New Year's Resolution that I am going to fully participate in the group builds for 2017 and follow the schedule to the letter (I heard u laughing)!! No I'm definitely going to give it my best shot - so to get the year off to a good start I've joined the F-16 group build with the following kit: I'm hoping to get cracking in the next couple of days so I will keep you posted on progress. I'm going to keep this one OOB and see how I get on. Good luck everyone
  20. Ok so I'm a big fan of the Phantom and decided a few months ago to do a joint build of Israeli and Japanese F4's. I used the Hasegawa kits for both builds with aftermarket decals from Isra Decal and DXM (stencils). I used the original decals for the JASDF Phantom in the main and considering they were printed in 1986 they came out well. Eduard cockpit aftermarket was also used and Ised Mr Color, Tamiya and Alclad paints for both. I got a lot of help form members on here during the build so thanks for that. The Israeli F4 has a temporary 'load out' as I am awaiting some of the Hasegawa sets. Overall I enjoyed the builds and even more so that the kits costs me £16 and £24 respectively which is great value considering I just paid £60 for the Hasegawa re-hash of the FGR1!!
  21. Have had this in the stash for 5 years now and it needs to be built! The Hasegawa 1/32nd General Dynamics F-16A (Kit #S20) which will be built OOB and in the mid 70's era 'Demonstrator' red/white/blue colour scheme, aircraft serial 75-0745. Michael
  22. Hi guys! I forgot the reasons why this one wasn't finished, I hope not too many pieces are missing... Also, I wonder what will happen when that masking tape will be pulled away Ciao. Roberto.
  23. “Welcome back my friends to the show that never ends. We're so glad you could attend! Come inside! Come inside!” For myself and my favorite all time musical group, 2016 was not a good year. To Keith Emerson and Greg Lake RIP. Your gift of music was outstanding. I have been absent from this fine forum for about a year now (other than occasionally lurking about and being jealous of fantastic builds that happen here every day). December 2015 I woke up with shooting pains throughout my body coupled with numbness in my extremities. Being the ever-diligent person I am and realizing that just ignoring it would not make it go away, (Not that I would ever try that, heaven forbid!) I began a wonderful odyssey of various health professionals poking, prodding, inserting, inspecting and failing to detect why I now had no feeling in my hands. The general pain shooting throughout my body had ceased, but there was absolutely no feeling in my hands. The best I can describe it is they feel as if they are constantly asleep. Anyway, going through a bunch of medical people that suggested everything from diabetes, (nope), carpel tunnel (nope), neuropathy (nope), cancer (not again) to me just being mental I came away with a wonderful diagnosis of we don’t know why you have no feeling in your hands, but we don’t think it is endangering your health. Yeah, didn’t make sense to me either. The best guess for my condition is narrowed to two causes, neither of which, I understand, is curable. The first, and my favorite, is I was exposed to some unknown chemical in Southeast Asia from either the U. S. forces or the communist forces and it is just now showing up. Now I did go into some very interesting areas where I shouldn’t have been, and into jungles that shouldn’t have anything sprayed in them but there was, and I was not privy to what was used, how it was to affect humans, as my chances of surviving the war were minimal. My cheery little group had 100% plus casualty rate. (Never could understand how that could be, except most of us got wounded at least once and foolishly kept returning to fight. Option one then is some unknown chemical has resided in my body for about 45 years and is just now starting to run rampant, cheery huh? The second option and what I really think is more likely is I have had shingles since 1990 when they were triggered by some cancer treatments. Just was told that sometimes as a side effect, you just loose feeling in your extremities, usually your hands. The cure, same as for shingles, just learn to live with it. And, for the last year my brothers in plastic, I have been learning to use my hands without having any feeling in them. You take for granted how much the sense of touch comes into play on a day by day basis. How tightly do you hold a Styrofoam cup? (Okay, I know I shouldn’t be using them, but some places still sell drinks that way!) Most people can feel the cup sidewalls beginning to give in by touch and then just maintain that pressure. By trial and error and many drink mishaps, I learned just how much to think to hold the cup so I didn’t either drop it or squish it. Same for holding eating utensils, cracking eggs (that was a fun lesson, the kitchen was a mess), holding glass bottles over tile floors. The amusing one that still gives me fits is how hard to grip pills when I take them out of a bottle to keep them from falling out of my hand. In regards to modeling, “Hi! My name is George. I am just learning how to assemble plastic kits. Bear with me!” So, from a rather massive stash (more on that later) I chose a relatively easy build to begin the trek back to putting plastic pieces together. The kit is 1/48 Hasegawa Bf 109 E-3. This will not only be a WIP for the 109, but probably, an interesting lesson on how much touch is used in model construction. I really am a newbie. I went to my trusty Photobucket account and can’t sign in. When I did sign in, it wouldn’t let me into my library or download pictures. Once that was sorted out, then I try to upload to Britmodeller and everything has changed with the new software version. ARGGGGHHHHHH. Okay, blood pressure back to normal so here goes. The kit looks very nice. Here is the box cover art and the plastic innards. It has some photo etch and a nice selection of decal choices. The first job is the cockpit. The selection of parts is nice. The seat has some basic seat belt detail, not great, but for me and this build adequate And the instrument panel is nothing to write home about, but for this build, some dry brushing will be enough as the canopy will be closed. Any resemblance to the actual panel instruments and the kit detail representation is strictly coincidental! I now will try to see how well I can botch a kit that should go together by itself. Wish me luck. As always, all comments are welcome.
  24. Hi everyone Last weekend I had some time off from work so I decided to clean out and remodel my workshop.... ....and in doing so I found a plane I started 3 years ago the Hasegawa 1/48 Hawker Typhoon 1b which as the title says will be built as MP197 using the rather lovely decals from Aviaeology AOD48003 Typhoon Special. At the time I had the Barracuda cast cockpit upgrade..... ...which in my opinion looks lovely, its just a shame most of it will never be seen again! Oh and for those observant amongst you you would have noticed the head armour is missing, I broke it off many moons ago but I still have it and I'll reattached it nearer the end of the build. General model pictures..... ....my 1/24 version is still on going but it is my long build so I need smaller stuff to keep me sane!
  25. Hi all Some pics of my first completed build for 2017, Hasegawa 1/48 Desert Snake Stuka. Only modifications were plastic wedges on ailerons replaced with actuators in brass plus Eduard seatbelts & gunsight. The mould has been reboxed many times and is showing it's age a bit now with more flash to be removed but still well worth the effort in the long run. Thanks for looking