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Found 517 results

  1. After the MiG-29 rollout, here´s my dads next jet project. He wanted to build a Phantom for a longer time now. Besides that the subject is related to my mother´s past, how so will be revealed when the model is finished. Gonna use the old Hasegawa kit with either Hi-Decals or CAM Decals.
  2. This aircraft is something close to my heart as I am the membership and events secretary for the Hawker Typhoon Preservation Project, We are aiming to get the world's only flying Hawker Typhoon MkIb flying again. This kit is the superb Hasegawa kit with Eduard cockpit upgrade,and 4 prop spinner from Ultracast. The aircraft was delivered to 174 ‘Mauritius’ squadron on 4th Jan 1945, based at B.100 Goch, and received the code ‘XP-W’. RB396 was lost on operations and was recorded Cat ‘E’ on 1st Apr 1945. Originally equipped with bombs after conversion to the Typhoon (July 1943), 174 squadron converted to rockets by January 1944. The squadron spent the next few months attacking radar stations, flying bomb sites and German communication links in northern France. After D-Day they moved to Normandy providing close support for the Army and attacking German tanks and transport. By September 1944 they had moved to the Netherlands where their remit was offensive sweeps over Germany. On the 1st April 1945 RB396 was the mount of Flt Lt Chris W House setting out from Goch for an offensive sweep. Shortly after selecting his target and releasing his salvo of rockets RB396 was hit by flak, too low to bail out and rapidly losing height Flt Lt House force landed his aircraft to the North East of Denekamp. In the immediate aftermath of the attack the whereabouts of Chris House was not known and as squadron members returned to Goch they reported that he was seen to successfully force land RB396 and it was assumed taken POW, had he survived the landing. He had indeed survived and successfully evaded capture, making his way back to allied lines and much to the surprise of his comrades arrived back at the squadron on 5th April. After 174 squadron was disbanded on 8th April Chris House went on to complete further operations and remained in the RAF until retirement long after the war. If your interested in further information have a look at:- http://hawkertyphoon.com/ Or: https://www.facebook.com/search/top/?q=hawker typhoon rb396 restoration
  3. Oh well - here goes: When I'm finished with the Caribou over in DeHavilland MegaGB I'll start on the Mercury in the Prototype GB and when THAT is done, I'll come back here to start on this: At the moment I'm going for the F with a whole bunch of Durandel missiles! Cheers and I hope to see you back here! Hans J
  4. As my ludicrously long Sea Vixen build finally shows signs of drawing to a close, thoughts turn to what to build next. I always try to have two things on the go at any one time, with the other being my never-ending Ark Royal build - but there is a limit to how much 1/350 scratch building and detailing I can stand at any one time, and I need to have something in 1/48 (my aircraft scale of choice) to keep me going. I thought about a twin Buccaneer build - an Anti-Flash White S1 and an Ark Royal (4) final commission S2D. Those will come at some point, since I have the kits and the necessary conversion materials. But watching the splendid work of Steve (Fritag), Debs (Ascoteer) and others has convinced me that it is high time I built something that I actually flew myself. Sea King or Lynx, Sea King or Lynx... much indecision was finally tilted towards the Queen of the Skies by all the press coverage of its retirement from RN SAR service earlier this year (though the ASaC7 Baggers will soldier on for a while yet), and by markdipXV711's excellent build of an 819 SAR cab which he and I flew in together 20-odd years ago. So, since 819 (my other Sea King squadron) has just been done, I have finally plumped for an aircraft from my first tour. Pull up a bollard and listen to a true dit. 820 Naval Air Squadron, 1988, 18 months into my first front-line tour. We were part of Ark Royal (5)'s CAG (carrier air group) throughout my time on the Squadron, and in July 1988 the ship plus 801 (8 x Sea Harrier FRS1), 849B Flight (3 x Sea King AEW2), a detachment from 845 (2 x Sea King HC4) and 820 (9 x Sea King HAS5) set off for Australia, via Malta, Singapore, Hong Kong, Brunei and Subic Bay (Philippines), and home via Mumbai and Gibraltar. 6 months away, and a bloody good time was had by all... Less than 2 weeks after we sailed, we were taking part in a NATO exercise in the approaches to the Med; basically we were playing the bad guys trying to force a passage through the straits, and a number of RN, USN and Spanish units were trying to stop us... including HM Submarines Torbay, Otter and Opportune. The aim of these exercises is not to be 100% realistic, but to make sure that there is maximum interaction, so occasionally there would be a 2 hour pause where the submarines, having come right inside the screen and "attacked" the hell out of the ships, would withdraw 30 miles and start again. We would knock off tracking them and leave them alone to reposition. In those long distant 1980s Cold War days, ASW was our bread and butter, and on the whole we were pretty good at it. Most of the time we did passive ASW - chucking huge quantities of sonobuoys out of the aircraft and finding submarines that way, often working with our Nimrod and P3C brethren, and often working against USSR boats rather than friendly exercise ones. In my first few weeks on the squadron we rippled 3 (3 cabs airborne 24/7) all the way from Norfolk VA to Harstad in Norway, including several days of tracking 2 Victor IIIs that were taking an interest in our games. It was pretty exhausting, but we could keep it up almost indefinitely. For the guys in the back, passive ASW was often good fun; 3-dimensional chess, and all that. But for the pilots it was skull-shatteringly dull, flying around at 4-5,000' (nosebleed territory for any self-respecting helicopter pilot) and stooging at 70kts for maximum endurance for hour after hour after hour. But on this occasion we were doing active ASW, the task for which the Sea King was originally designed. Active ASW in the daytime is enormous fun for the pilots, especially when you are in contact. At night the aircraft flies the profiles for you, closely monitored by the pilots (since you are down at 40', you want to keep a close eye on things in the pitch black; it can be a tad buttock-clenching at night). In the day, however, you generally fly it all yourself ("manual jumps" as the jargon goes) without any assistance from the AFCS (automatic flight control system), and it's a blast. So there you have the scene. I am 18 months into front line flying, and have reached the dizzy heights of being captain of my own crew. My P2 for this trip is a hugely experienced USN exchange pilot (way more experienced than me, but flying as second pilot while he gets up to speed with RN procedures). We do 45 minutes of active Torbay bashing, but then reach the pre-briefed pause while she repositions. Rather than disrupt the flying programme, we simply keep going, so we have taken a plastic milk float with us (hi tech, I tell you) and are doing some grappling training; chuck the milk float out of the back and practice SAR with it - much harder than it sounds, cos the milk float thrashes around in the down wash, so it is great training for the back seat in conning the aircraft and the front seat in hovering it precisely. A few minutes into the grapple work, with Jim the USN guy on the controls, the port engine stops... or so we thought. The Nr (rotor speed) decays as the good engine runs out of puff (too hot and too heavy to hover on one engine) and we subside rapidly onto the water yelling Mayday and punching the windows out. Phil Smith, the Observer, says he had never seen anyone strap in as fast as poor old BJ Sandoe, the Crewman who had been lying on the floor of the aircraft with his head sticking out, conning Jim onto the milk float, when suddenly the Atlantic Ocean came up to greet him. As I reached up to shut down the No 2 engine (cos you sure as heck don't want to abandon a helicopter while the rotors are still turning) it became apparent that the No 1 engine had not in fact failed, but simply run down to flight idle. The fuel computer had developed a fault and tried to shut the throttle, but there is a physical interlock built into the system for precisely this emergency, called the Flight Idle Stop, which is basically a screw jack that prevents the throttle from closing beyond a certain point - the very last thing you do when starting up is to engage it. So we over-rode the computer and managed the throttle manually, the Nr came back up to where it should be and shot off the surface of the sea like a startled rabbit, downgraded our Mayday to a Pan, and flew back to Mum. A Green Endorsement much later (still on the wall of my loo) and very shaky legs for a few hours afterwards. Well, it has to be this cab, doesn't it? So I present to you ZE419 / 014 / R of 820 Naval Air Squadron in July 1988; a bog standard Sea King HAS5. Dark blue (this was just before the days when everything became grey), black markings. Photos of the real aircraft to follow, I expect, but for now she is one of these in the distance (photo taken the day before we sailed from Pompey, so about 2 weeks before the ditching): The aircraft will be built much as in this photo, actually; folded, included the tail, with engine blanks in. The cabs in the photo have tip socks on, but I will probably build mine with the more robust blade support system known as "Forth Road Bridge" gear (as in this Mk 5 at the Fleet Air Arm Museum): The basis of the model will be the Hasegawa 1/48 Sea King, using the "Ark Royal HAR5" [no such thing; it should be HU5] edition (which for some reason Photobucket refuses to rotate, so turn your head): ...and the excellent Flightpath conversion set, which contains all sorts of goodies important to this build - notably weapons carriers, assorted aerials and a tail rotor much better suited to having a gust lock fitted to it. Herewith statutory sprue shot: ...and pic of the contents of Flightpath box and a couple of other aftermarket goodies: As it happens, I also have a Hasegawa AEW2a kit (acquired before the Mk5 kit was released, as the only game in town for a future Mk5 build). This will also be useful, since it contains a number of applicable bits such as Orange Crop ESM aerials (removed from the HU5). And since all the Hasegawa boxings are variations on the same theme, the kit already contains some parts that I will use - e.g. the HU5 has the sand filter in front of the engine intakes, but in my era we simply had the "barn door"; similarly the HU5 has the sonar removed and a blanking plate fitted. The kit contains both a barn door and a (sort of, -ish) sonar. [i also have a second complete "Ark Royal HAR5", designated eventually to be an 819 SAR aircraft... but not yet]. There will not be much progress for a few days, while I get the Vixen over the line.... Herewith photo of the appropriate log book entry (bottom line:
  5. All right then, time to get started! My project for this group build is the Grumman/General Dynamics F-111B. I suspect that everyone knows the story of this aircraft and its development, but if not I'll direct you to the mother-lode of F-111B information later on in this post. My initial idea is to model one of the Phoenix missile test aircraft, and BuNo 151972 seems a good candidate. This, of course, will be a conversion and my base kit will be the Hasegawa 1:72 RAAF F-111C/G. This is a great kit, and contains all necessary parts to build either the C or G model. The G is essentially the same as the FB-111 as you know. Let's see what we get (and it's so much that it's difficult to close the box without squeezing the contents). First, the specific kit I'm using: Inside we find a lot of styrene! This next photo may look like two copies of the same sprue, but they are different - one is sprue C and the other sprue D. The difference is primarily with respect to the intakes as the F-111C and G had variations in this area (Triple Plow I vs. Triple Plow II). Since 151972 did not have either of these intakes, I will be modifying the Triple Plow I. And the rest: And finally two of these babies: I've acquired several bits of aftermarket goodies to help with this conversion, starting with the set from Pete's Hangar which unfortunately is no longer available. My understanding is that this set has a few problems, but they don't look to be insurmountable. Apparently, the shape of the nose, and its demarcation with the fuselage, is not quite right, but that's why they call it modelling. Some additional decal sheets that may be of help - the sheet from Pete's Hangar is also pictured here, but the other two sheets are from Microscale and are quite old. 72-132 includes the markings for 151972, and 72-452 includes stenciling for the early models of the F-111. Also shown here is the sheet from the kit, not sure if any of this will be used. The Phoenix testing logo is different between the Microscale and Pete's sheets, and based on photographs it looks like Microscale is better (for instance, Pete's omits the fire that the Phoenix bird is emerging from, the USMC globe and USN anchor). I hope those old Microscale sheets are still good! Some additional aftermarket that may be used. Obviously, not all of the photoetch for the F-111D/F is appropriate, but some of it may be useful. We'll see. The masks are fine, but what's this with the ejection seats for a B-57 Canberra? The F-111 had a ejection capsule! Well, yes it did, after a fashion. However, the first three F-111B prototypes, including 151972, did not have the capsule, and were instead fitted with Douglas Escapac ejection seats. According to the Ejection Site, they were model 1C. The resin seats from Pavla are models 1C-6, and have the right basic shape. But I suspect they will need some alteration or enhancement before the end of the day. Finally, the old Revell kit from 1966 will also be used, as it contains a lot of parts that will help, like the knife edge boat tail, aft fuselage bullet fairings (speed bumps as they were called), etc. I picked this up at a model show, and although it's been started (the B/C/FB long wing tips have been glued to the wings) that won't be a problem as I won't be using them. This is one of the few kits produced which claimed to be a B model. Like a lot of kits from the 60s, this one came out while the aircraft was still being developed, and contains several issues. But I think it will come in handy nonetheless. The loose parts, rolling around in the box: And the ones still clinging to the runners: Also in the box were these four pylons, which I suspect are from an F/A-18. But they have a shape resemblance (kind of) to the pylons used by 151972 for the Phoenix missiles. I will be checking if they are close to being the right size, and might work for the model. Again, we'll see. Perhaps they can be modified, maybe not. But it was nice of the chap who sold this to me to include them! The Phoenix missiles will probably be sourced from a Hasegawa F-14A kit, but will need some mods to represent the missiles used in the F-111B test program. Now, about that mother-lode. If you're going to build an F-111B, you simply have to have this monograph: Tommy is the F-111B subject matter expert, and he contributes regularly to Britmodeller. I expect he will show up here to keep me on the straight and moral path. If you follow this link, you'll go to Tommy's blog where he has posted several links to articles that concern the F-111B. There are also instructions for how to obtain the amendments and errata for the F-111B monograph. All of this material taken together remains the prime reference for this much-maligned bird. Cheers, Bill
  6. Hello fellow F-111 fans, My contribution to this long-awaited GB is an F-111D, built from Hasegawa's F-111E boxing, in 1/72 of course. Markings will have to be from aftermarket sources, mainly to help render the different version, but also because the original kit decals for both my F-111E and F-111D/F boxings are sadly in a poor state. Other aftermarket bits and pieces I plan to incorporate are Eduard etch for the cockpit, Eduard canopy masks, a Master pitot and possibly a Pavla canopy. Enough about the 'plan', here are some pictures: Hasegawa F-111E by Andrew, on Flickr Instructions, etch, mask, canopy by Andrew, on Flickr More sprues by Andrew, on Flickr Wings, fuselage, canopy by Andrew, on Flickr Fwd fuselage, intakes by Andrew, on Flickr I've (sort of) cleaned the bench and will make a start very soon - maybe tomorrow night, which is close enough to 1st of April for me... cheers, Andrew.
  7. Eduard next limited edition kit will a 1/32nd Curtiss P-40N Warhawk - ref. 11104 Source: https://www.eduard.com/store/out/media/distributors/leaflet/leaflet2017-07.pdf V.P.
  8. Ok, so. I bought the BigEd set for the Tomcat and it came with a set of F.O.D guards. This influenced my decision to pose my finished (hopefully) model parked. I've now got to the stage of fitting, only to find that they're nowhere near a 'close' fit. They will go into the inlet but they're just too tall. They sit at an angle. I sort of assumed they should be upright. Even the few pictures I've managed to find have confirmed this. Sitting just slightly back on the lower lip and perfectly upright. So, after seeing if they could be modified and quickly deciding against it, I purchased the Quickboost set. Great set as they are (with two decal sheets to boot!), I have exactly the same problem as the etched set. I made sure to have the intake ramp in the fully up position, it physically would not go any further. So, is it that the parts are too big for the kit they're designed for, have I built it wrong or am I just missing something completely obvious? It's the finally couple of pieces to finish off this build before I embark on the next project (Su-15 I think), so any help would be greatly appreciated. Cheers!
  9. Hi guys, I'd notice that Hasegawa just released an old tool early spitfire into a brand new box, dedicated to Douglas Bader. Having already Tamiya's Mk.IX, Mk.VIII I was wondering about adding an early mark to my stash. If I'm not surprised or impressed by raised panel lines, wrong or bad shapes and dimensions is much more a problem to me, so can anyone tell me about this, and the overall kit's qualities? I did a quick search, the result being this review, and Cybermodeller in general is way above what I'm looking for. Still good to give an overview, though. TIA
  10. This is my latest build; a 1/72 S-3A Viking. Hasegawa is my go to company when I want to build something and this one was not a disappointment. Fit was very good, with one exception. The decals were good and I think it make a good build. The one exception to the good fit was the underside wing to fuselage joint which I had to fill with 10 thousandth card. Also used was the Eduard interior. Next up is the Mach 2 X-24A
  11. I know I haven't finished the Luchs yet but I picked this wee beastie up at Telford, liked the box art, and parted with very few readies (cheap I tells ya) 'Oooo zimmerit!' I thought..... Suppose I should have checked before jumping to conclusions Sprue shot with holes because... I did a bit No sign of zimmerit So... do I go nuts and manually, yes, by hand, apply scale zimmerit coat to this.. er... very small, big cat. Have to say I've also been eying up the moulded in tools too I wonder if there are better tracks for it Or.. and this is where I could do with some input, should I go strictly OOB to see what I can make of a basic kit with glue and a lick o' paint? Ooooh input! That's one for you Johnny boy Fixit Phil P.S. Why do I never see the spelling mistakes BEFORE I submit the post?
  12. This aircraft is something close to my heart as I am the membership and events secretary for the Hawker Typhoon Preservation Project, We are aiming to get the world's only flying Hawker Typhoon MkIb flying again. This kit is the superb Hasegawa kit with Eduard cockpit upgrade,and 4 prop spinner from Ultracast. The aircraft was delivered to 174 ‘Mauritius’ squadron on 4th Jan 1945, based at B.100 Goch, and received the code ‘XP-W’. RB396 was lost on operations and was recorded Cat ‘E’ on 1st Apr 1945. Originally equipped with bombs after conversion to the Typhoon (July 1943), 174 squadron converted to rockets by January 1944. The squadron spent the next few months attacking radar stations, flying bomb sites and German communication links in northern France. After D-Day they moved to Normandy providing close support for the Army and attacking German tanks and transport. By September 1944 they had moved to the Netherlands where their remit was offensive sweeps over Germany. On the 1st April 1945 RB396 was the mount of Flt Lt Chris W House setting out from Goch for an offensive sweep. Shortly after selecting his target and releasing his salvo of rockets RB396 was hit by flak, too low to bail out and rapidly losing height Flt Lt House force landed his aircraft to the North East of Denekamp. In the immediate aftermath of the attack the whereabouts of Chris House was not known and as squadron members returned to Goch they reported that he was seen to successfully force land RB396 and it was assumed taken POW, had he survived the landing. He had indeed survived and successfully evaded capture, making his way back to allied lines and much to the surprise of his comrades arrived back at the squadron on 5th April. After 174 squadron was disbanded on 8th April Chris House went on to complete further operations and remained in the RAF until retirement long after the war. If your interested in further information have a look at:- http://hawkertyphoon.com/ Or: https://www.facebook.com/search/top/?q=hawker typhoon rb396 restoration
  13. Hi guys, I will build a Mistel I in 1/32 scale. I will use a Revell/Hasegawa Messerschmitt Bf-109 G2 as the leading airplane. For the flying bomb I will use the Revell Junkers Ju-88 A4 kit with the Aims Mistel I conversion set. I think I have some extra's for the Bf-109. I will place some foto's later. Cheers,
  14. After Hasegawa 2016 (http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235000783-hasegawa-2016/ - thanks 172flogger) I open a new topic for Hasegawa's 2017 reissues and monthly newsfiles. The first one will be: - ref. 08246 - 1/32nd - Boeing F4B4 - original kit: https://www.scalemates.com/kits/148093-hasegawa-js-066-boeing-f4b-4 Release expected on January 22nd, 2017 Source: http://www.hasegawa-model.co.jp/product/08246/ V.P.
  15. For your viewing pleasure here is my Hasegawa X-29 build. I built this because the theme for my club's July contest is Red, White & Blue and this is the only kit I had with that scheme. Hopefully there will be enough of each color to qualify. The kit was the usual Hasegawa excellent fit. However the decals were a bit of a nightmare. The kit is old and so were the decals. I had 2 boxes. In one the decals were badly yellowed, but in the other they looked pretty good. However they turned out to be kind of brittle and I was trying to position them they started breaking apart. So I ended up with non optimal positioning and a lot of breaks. Luckily I was able to get a pretty good color match. but touching up the fine lines was difficult and I had to make do with good enough rather then perfect. Anyway, here it is; Enjoy
  16. This was finished a while ago, but I have only got round to photographing it this week; the WiP is here. The big change here is the Aires cockpit set, an amount of work but worth it. I am fairly happy with the finish but the decals proved to be not as opaque as I would like, so some colour demarcations do show through in places. If you think the pitot looks a bit odd, the real one has subsequently been found and substituted!
  17. If I didn’t know she’s an AAB-1 I would say she’s a Ju-88, bl**dy similar! This particular plane (serial number 7) was built by SNCASE plant in Toulouse and delivered to GB I/31 "Aunis" bomber group on May 8, 1945. That’s why she has no armament and looks very clean.The Hasegawa kit is not very easy to build, the nose is a real nightmare. Eduard Zoom interior set was added (waste of money and time as just the seatbelts are visible), the main U/C legs were moved forward and the wheels flattened a bit. Painted with Hunze H80, decals by PT Decals. Thank you for looking.
  18. Hi all, A late entry to the GB and I must confess I already see no hope of finishing this one on time. Commitments plus recent care for a family member eat up most of the available spare time. Still, worth a try. Also: I changed phones recently and lost a couple of pictures in the process - therefore, there's some gaps in the WiP chronology. So this is what I'm starting with: a box with... er.. stuff. Quite some years ago -might be more than 20 years- I bought a half completed Hasegawa F-111A at a modelling show or a flea market (don't quite remember) for a silly low price and kept it since then to rework it into something fairly nice. Funny thing was, it had one short span wing and one long one. About three years ago, when about to return to the hobby, I began to search ebay and other sites for spare F-111 wings - for which I duly placed a bid and won, don't know for how much, but quite a bit more than the original F-111A kit. The kit came in a heavily damaged box. The model had been partially pained with enamels, so I stripped the plastic of paint immediately (two decades ago, didn't think of making pics then), deconstructed it so I could rework it more properly and stored it in a plastic container to await the day it would be built. Que the dramatic music: That day... Has come. I should be building an F-111A because that's what the kit gives me as an option but I am a foolish person and I'm going to try to make an F out of this -the Triple Plow II intake and wider fuselage being the greatest challenge here. Just for practice sake, to see if I can pull it off. Anyhow, this model isn't intended as a show winner but should work well when I need dynamic backgrounds in scale photography. I'll be using using the bomb bay cover and Foxtrot exhausts from the kit below. The model will depict an F-111F in the first years of 48th TFW service, circa 1977-1980, like HERE. It should mimic an aircraft taxiing with pilots in the cockpit, wings folded at 54 degrees and auxiliary inlet doors open. As mentioned earlier, I lost a couple of pics so we're kind of falling right in the middle of the build. -The nose section was already assembled upon purchase, here I've re-attached it to the rear fuselage. The cockpit was stripped of paint two decades ago. -The vertical tail has been freed from its rudder and glued to the fuselage. -Also note the cut-out wing boxes to make room for the swept-back wings. It occurred to me that cutting out the wing gloves entirely would possibly work better for the swept back wings than increase the size of aperture that's already there. -Not very visible is widened fuselage just behind the intake area. I played with the idea of simply making two cuts and by bending, offset that area enough to correspond to the Triple Plow II. Which would have been the smart thing to do. Instead I went bonkers and did something else entirely, namely I stuck layer upon layer of thin (0.005 mm) Evergreen sheet on the existing plastic using CA gel and then sanded away the inside. Time-consuming, messy, and, well frankly unnecessary. -The wing box was strengthened by adding a bottom deck to it using plasticard. Next I'll try to explain how I managed to finish the intakes, for that I need to find the photos I know I took of the progress. Here's how they came out (still rough!). Thanks for having a peek. Jay
  19. Another OOB build, this time of the still good Hasegawa kit of this weird little twin (which oddly is almost exactly the same length and wingspan as the Whirlwind); very few changes, really just the angle of the seat - it should be bolt upright and cramping the pilot into the front of the cockpit - and an Eduard steel seat harness. Paints are a mix or brands, and again I had a problem with the Alclad Klear Cote refusing to dry, resulting in some dust getting irretrievably stuck in places I realised after I took these that I had omitted the undercarriage doors - they are on now!
  20. Right folks - this was my submission for the F-16 group build which I managed to finish a couple of days late I was so close but yet so far!!! This is only my second modern jet build and I really enjoyed it - made more enjoyable by the fact it's an excellent kit IMOH. Hopefully I can have as much luck completing the Zvezda Mig-21 for the other group build. So I would really appreciate your feedback on this one and I hope I have done the kit and the aircraft some justice. Built OOB with just a couple of tweaks such as a scratched up pitot tube. Pics below - hope you enjoy:
  21. Hi, I have a Hasegawa Blue Angels F-4J kit I shall be coverting to an F-4D (note from the future: plans have changed and it's going to become an RF-4C - see the horrible box lid for a big clue). I have a proper F-4D kit in the stash as well but I want to have this kit out of the way because of the blue plastic (dunno why) I'll need to reproduce the under nose sensor somehow as well as the intake trunking. The plastic cup with 'intake' on the lid contains all the necessary parts I hope - mostly thin plastic card I have prepared a couple of years ago. I'll be finishing this Phantom in USAF 49th TFW markings - which features an HO tail code and a TAC badge. And yes HO stands for Holloman AFB, NM, however this unit was distinctly also assigned to USAFE (the only unit within TAC to be encumbered this way) and had specific infrastructure, including TAB-V shelters, in place at Hahn and Ramstein air bases to deal with the yearly influx of people and planes - in effect, the 'Crested Cap' deployments were mass migrations to Hahn and Ramstein as part of the Reforger exercises. The Wing deployed up to 1977 when the F-4Ds were replaced by F-15s, after which the Crested Caps were taken over by the 4th TFW. Some aircraft would usually remain in Europe during summer and autumn while air and ground crews would be rotated. I have my eye on a 1976 example, when Phantoms regularly appeared with white stencils on the darker camouflage, much like this one: Jay
  22. For no particular reason, Ive been attempting a few Vietnam-era SEA camouflage schemes over the last month - these were both cheapy "dirty bag of plastic" kits (costing £1 and £5 respectively) from a model show that needed rescuing and were ideal for some experimentation. I think my light green is a little too vibrant and the tan too light, although it looks better in real life than it does on the camera. They're both old Hasegawa kits, although I believe that the Thunderchief originally came in a FROG box. Decals for the F-105d are from Print Scale (MiG Eaters) and for the F-4, they are as supplied with the kit. F-105D Thunderchief - Memphis Belle II, 357 TFS, 355th TFW, Takhli Royal Thai Air Base, Thailand, 1970 This is really a very crude kit, although it has commendably sharp edges to its flying surfaces! F-4E Phantom II 469 TFS, 388th TFW, Royal Thai Air Base, Korat Thailand, 1969. This is a better kit although still very basic in detail. Mine came with a full weapons load, which more recent issues do not. FredT
  23. Hello All, This one has also been on the 'shelf of doom' for some time. Probably about 4 or 5 years... It's the Hasegawa Ferrari 348 tb. It'll go well with the other Ferraris that I have been working on. What with the 308 having been finished, and the 288 GTO nearly complete, I thought that I would clear the decks of old builds and add this one to the list of 'in progress'. The box. A pretty car, if not quite so beautiful as the 308 & 288... The sprues. It doesn't look a lot, but the engine is already built and almost ready to be put aside. ... and, the instructions. I'm hoping that this Hasegawa kit will be a bit more successful than a couple of others I tried... I tried to construct the 1/24th Ferrari F189, but it went completely pear-shaped on me and the body work would not fit. I binned it! I also tried the 1/24th Jaguar XJR8 (or was it the XJR9?, I can't remember). That was going well, then I managed to split the rather large wind-screen! That ended up as spare parts... On the other hand, the 1/32nd F-16 seems to going rather better. Anyway, more pictures... The body has been painted with Halfords acrylic spray paint. I can't remember the colour. But I don't need any more (unless I screw up with the cement!). If I do, I'm pretty certain that I can mix up the right cocktail of (Tamiya) colours to get a near enough match. The engine, not quite fully assembled. Again, I have added ignition leads. No engine looks right without ignition leads, except a Diesel. Actually, my wife's Meriva is a petrol, and the ignition leads are nowhere to be seen. Each spark-plug is fed by it's own coil in an ignition block that sits on top of them. Anyway, utterly irrelevant in this case, as the 348 has separate leads to each plug, and they go ... somewhere! (More on that later!) The wheels. Matt chrome seems to work on car kits. I always thing the the high-chrome finish looks too toy-like on 1/24th scale! (Actually, I built the Revell 1/8th scale Jag, and the chrome on that looked too bright and toy-like!) The windows, door-mirrors and the engine cover. That's it for the moment. Thanks for looking, Alan.
  24. Kit manufacture: Hasegawa Scale: 1/72 Type: A-10A Thunderbolt II Extras used: Verlinden Productions resin and photoetch update Paints and colours used: Vallejo Model Air Ghost Grey in the cockpit, various Vallajo and Tamiya paints inside, Gunze H57 Aircraft Grey, H301 Grey FS36081, H302 Green FS34092 and H303 Green FS34102 for the camo colours. Aqua Gloss, Tamiya Semi Gloss and Flat Coat were used for the clear coats. Weather was done with thinned down Tamiya Rubber black and Flory Dark Dirt weathering wash. The kit was ok... Raised panel lines are a pain as they are hard to reproduce when lost through sanding as well as cause issues with holding wash. The fit wasn't great; a lot of filler and sanded needed. To be fair it is an older kit and the amount of resin and lead I crammed in definitely didn't help. That said, it wasn't cheap for an older kit. I bought this before I really new about reboxing etc, and knowing what I know now I'd have probably invested the same money on a new kit. At the end of the day, I'm pleased with how she turned out and she undeniably looks like a hog. Here's the pics: So there we go! Thanks for looking! Comments and criticism welcome as always, Many thanks, Val
  25. Perhaps two is not enough to make a clutch, but it's what I've got. I've stalled out on my Jaguar build for now, and feel the small-scale bug biting again, so I conjured up some phantoms (all one needs is goat's blood, backwards chanting, and some baking soda). I have a Hasegawa F-4C and a Fujimi FGR.2 I've also got two sets of Truedetails rocket chairs, and have placed an order for two sets of Airwaves Phantom canopy details. The plan is to build the FGR.2 as a 92 squadron's XV414 based at Wildenrath, Germany in 1979. For this I'll be using decals in the box, along with some spare 4s from a second Fujimi sheet I found laying around. Photo credit: King Cobra 92 https://www.flickr.com/photos/50963614@N03/12057567995/ The F-4C will be built as a mid-1970s F-4D from Lakenheath, UK. These aircraft were in S.E.A. scheme, but a few got a bad batch of tan, which turned to a light pea green, as seen in the photo below. I have ordered the Xtradecal sheet from Hannants to make this possible. Photo Credit: Fred M (http://www.fightercontrol.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?f=18&p=705920) I have some writing to finish first, but wife is out with friends tonight, so I hope to get started later!