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Found 108 results

  1. Bf 109F Cockpit Set & Propeller 1:48 Eduard Brassin The Eduard Bf 109s are great kits but there is always room for some Brassin Goodies. Propeller LATE (648288) As the title would suggest this is a replacement propeller for the kit unit. You get a new hub, spinner, blades and central cannon shaft in resin with a photo etch end for the gun opening. A jog is supplied to glue the separate blades into the hub at the right angle. Cockpit Set (648279) This set is designed to replace the kit cockpit. There are 17 resin parts, photo etch, decals and an instrument film. You get a complete new cockpit tub, with a lower part, sidewalls, and front panel. A new seat is included (with belts) as well as a multipart instrument panel topped of with a new gunsight. Control wheels, stick, and rudder pedals are also brought in. New armour is provided for behind the seat and in the canopy. The canopy struct is also included. Conclusion These sets will no doubt improve on an already great kit. Recommended. Review samples courtesy of
  2. CBU-87 (672127) 1:72 Eduard Brassin The CBU-87 or Cluster Bomb Unit was a free-fall sub-munitions dispenser brought in to replace the older model in the 80s, which has flip-out stabilising fins, and can drop up to 202 bomb-lets to cover a minimum 20m2 area with a variety of types of explosive canister. Whilst their use is banned in many countries due to their lingering effects on civilian population when unexploded ordnance is stumbled upon by the unwary, they are still used by the US and some other countries who did not sign the agreement. The set arrives in the familiar Brassin box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts. There are six canisters in the box, with separate tail-fins that fit with a butt-joint to the main body. The fins are depicted folded for carriage, and as well as the resin parts there are copious stencils & markings to apply to the bodies, and as usual a painting and decaling guide is printed on the front of the instructions, with colour call-outs in Gunze codes. Detail on the fins and bomb bodies is excellent, with different types of rivets evident on the casing, plus a fine rendition of the folded fins. You will need to remove the bombs from the casting stubs with a fine saw, and if you are concerned about the butt-joints fitting well, simply make the centres concave to reduce the likelihood of this happening. As usual, take the precaution of wearing a mask when cutting or sanding resin, as the tiny particles are harmful to your health if breathed in. Washing the parts in warm water will also improve the adhesion of paint, as there may still be some moulding release agent on the parts when you receive them. Conclusion. These are highly detailed units and the addition of full markings will make sure they contribute to the look of your 1:72 build. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  3. AGM-114 Hellfire (648280) 1:48 Eduard Brassin The Hellfire is a fire-and-forget anti-armour missile that has been used extensively (and expensively) in the Middle East, both against armour, and targets that are required to be taken out with precision. Carrying only 20lbs of high explosives in its warhead, it is still a powerful weapon and speeds to the target using its own radar guidance, which is housed behind a snub glass nose cone. They are the favourite arms of the Apache and the Predator drones due to their low weight and precision, and numerous variants have been used. As usual with Eduard's larger resin sets, they arrive in the familiar Brassin rectangular box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions on top, doubling as additional protection. This set contains resin and Photo-Etch (PE) parts to build eight missiles, plus a pair of four-missile Multiple Ejector Racks, as well as a choice of clear and FOD covered seeker heads. The main missile body is a single part, with a clear or opaque resin seeker head, PE fins fore and aft, plus a PE exhaust ring. If the missiles aren't being used on a rack, a small resin part is attached just behind the nose, otherwise the lug is subsumed within the rail once attached. The four-point racks are made from a resin body with two arms attached to provide the extra stations, with PE rail ends, a PE rear panel, and some additional resin pipework between the rails. The missiles are shown in a set of scrap diagrams to show the location of the decals, which are supplied on a small sheet within the bag that contains the two PE sheets. As usual, the colour call-outs are provided in Gunze codes. A 4-pack of Hellfires under the wing(let) of any suitable aircraft looks rather good (IMHO), so these should sell incredibly well. As always with Eduard resin, the casting is first rate, crisp, and with sensibly placed casting blocks to ease removal of the parts. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  4. P-47D Wheels 1:32 Eduard Brassin The wheels are one area of a kit which really do benefit from resin replacement when they are this good. The wheels are individual units with the hubs as separate parts. The solid tail wheel is also included. Conclusion These are really well cast units from Eduard and will enhance you P-47 model. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  5. Bf 109F Wheels 1:42 Eduard Brassin The wheels are one area of a kit which really do benefit from resin replacement when they are this good. The wheels are individual units with the spokes as separate parts. The tail wheel which incorporates the leg seems to be made of a different harder resin. Conclusion These are really well cast units from Eduard and will enhance you Bf 109F model. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  6. CBU-87 1:32 Eduard Brassin The CBU-87 or Cluster Bomb Unit was a free-fall submunitions dispenser brought in to replace the older model in the 80s, which has flip-out stabilising fins, and can drop up to 202 bomblets to cover a minimum 20m2 area with a variety of types of explosive canister. Whilst their use is banned in many countries due to their lingering effects on civilian population when unexploded ordnance is stumbled upon by the unwary, they are still used by the US and some other countries who did not sign the agreement. The set arrives in the familiar Brassin box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts. There are six canisters in the box, with separate tail-fins that fit with a butt-joint to the main body. The fins are depicted folded for carriage, and as well as the resin parts there are copious stencils & markings to apply to the bodies, and as usual a painting and decaling guide is printed on the front of the instructions, with colour call-outs in Gunze codes. Detail on the fins and bomb bodies is excellent, with different types of rivets evident on the casing, plus a fine rendition of the folded fins. You will need to remove the bombs from the casting stubs with a fine saw, and if you are concerned about the butt-joints fitting well, simply make the centres concave to reduce the likelihood of this happening. As usual, take the precaution of wearing a mask when cutting or sanding resin, as the tiny particles are harmful to your health if breathed in. Washing the parts in warm water will also improve the adhesion of paint, as there may still be some moulding release agent on the parts when you receive them. Conclusion. These are highly detailed units and the addition of full markings will make sure they contribute to the look of your 1:32 build. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  7. Yak-38 Forger Ejection Seat 1:48 Eduard Brassin The Harrierski from Hobby Boss has been out a while now, but it's never too late to get hold of a good ejection seat to fill that cramped cockpit with a bit of detail. The K-36VM seat installed in the Yak was shoe-horned into the cockpit and to be honest, not much else can be seen. The set arrives in the familiar Brassin clamshell box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between the two halves, doubling as the header card. Inside the box you get the crispest resin you will ever see, with ten resin parts and a small fret of pre-painted nickel-plated Photo-Etch (PE) parts for extra detail. The seat pan and headbox are mated via a trio of long pegs that ensure a snug fit, with resin ejection handle housing that is augmented by PE parts between the pilot's knees. Resin swing-down arm rests fit to pegs on the sides of the seat back, and a control panel is installed on the right side. At the rear two rams and the central support for the ejection mechanism is added from a combination of resin and PE. The rest of the PE parts are used to detail the seat with stencils and levers, with the option of adding some small sections of wire from your own stock to complete the finest details. Some of the PE parts are best added after painting, as their details will be obscured by paint unless masked. With careful painting, the seat will become the focus of the cockpit, needing little else to finish it off. Review sample courtesy of
  8. Here is my Revell 1/32 Fw 190 F-8 built with the Eduard Brassin engine, cockpit, wheels and uc legs, and prop. It's taken 3 months to complete and is destined to be part of a diorama cover in the WIP diorama section here. I hope you like it! The build is covered in WIP here.
  9. Harrier GR.7/9 (648384for Hasegawa) 1:48 Eduard Brassin The Hasegawa Harriers are well-respected kits, but as moulding technology moves on, there are areas that start to look a little below-par, and coupled with the paucity of weapons in the box, a lot of modellers like to make some upgrades to the basic kit when building. Eduard have a number of sets available for this kit, and they have now released this set that contains a number of them, concentrating their efforts on the most obvious areas. The set arrives in the familiar Brassin rectangular profile box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions assisting Exhaust Nozzles - Four resin nozzles, which are direct replacements for the two part kit nozzles, so not only do you avoid having to fill the seams, but you also get a much better level of detail into the bargain. Sniper ATP - Harrier used this target designation pod extensively, and this set contains all the necessary parts with the adapter rail that is required for attachment to the Harrier. The main body is cut from its pouring plug and the join is covered by a PE part, with an optional "black box" on the aft end, while the movable seeker head and PE lens is fitted into the recess in the front. Then the glazing parts in clear resin are prepared by adding a bevel to their edges as shown in the accompanying diagram, before gluing to the lip around the edges of the window. The adapter rail, sway-braces and pylon are fixed to the top of the pod body, with some small PE parts providing extra detail, and decals supplied for the stencils. If you wanted to pose the pod in its deployed mode, simply turn the seeker head windows to the downward position using your references. TERMA Pod – this defence pod isn't exclusively used by the Harrier, so it has uses with other aircraft, but it is carried by it, so it has been included here, and consists of two resin parts and a small fret of pre-painted PE. The pod is liberated from its casting blocks, then glued together to form the pod body. The PE parts are then affixed to the exterior, which is best done after main painting is completed due to them being pre-printed. Ejection Seat – a complete resin seat with cushions, plus PE belts and other details, plus a small number of stencils. Wheels - The landing gear of the Harrier is described as bicycle-style, with a single nose wheel and large twin tail wheel, both of which resin parts , as are the little stabiliser wheels half-way along the wing with detailed resin yokes and tyres added. Conclusion A great set that is pretty much a one-stop box for anyone needing to upgrade their Hasegawa Harrier. After installation and sympathetic painting, the difference will be plain to see. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  10. P-38J Turbochargers & Air Intakes (648283 for Academy) 1:48 Eduard Brassin The P-38 was an innovative and agile fighter with a speed and grace that defied its large size, making it a formidable foe in late WWII combat. Engine power delivery via the two counter-rotating props was significantly improved by the addition of a large turbocharger unit that was mounted on the top of each engine boom, which makes it quite a focus of attention on any finished Lightning model. This new set from Eduard's Brassin range arrives in the familiar Brassin clamshell box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between the two halves, doubling as the header card. Inside are the two main bodies of the turbochargers, two large intake fairings, four smaller ones, and a sheet of Photo-Etch (PE) brass for the surrounding heat shield. The only modification needed to the kit is to remove the two small intakes on the top of the engine booms. The other parts are just drop-in replacements, even the PE parts. Cutting the parts from the casting blocks will require some patience, as the block for the main turbocharger part is quite large, and lends itself to removal by either a razor saw, or for expediency, a motor tool. As usual, take the precaution of wearing a mask when cutting or sanding resin, as the tiny particles are harmful to your health if breathed in. Washing the parts in warm water will also improve the adhesion of paint, as there may still be some moulding release agent on the parts when you receive them. Review sample courtesy of
  11. CBU-87 1:48 Eduard Brassin The CBU-87 or Cluster Bomb Unit was a free-fall submunitions dispenser brought in to replace the older model in the 80s, which has flip-out stabilising fins, and can drop up to 202 bomblets to cover a minimum 20m2 area with a variety of types of explosive canister. Whilst their use is banned in many countries due to their lingering effects on civilian population when unexploded ordnance is stumbled upon by the unwary, they are still used by the US and some other countries who did not sign the agreement. The set arrives in the familiar Brassin clamshell box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between the two halves, doubling as the header card. There are six canisters in the box, with separate tail-fins that fit with a butt-joint to the main body. The fins are depicted folded for carriage, and as well as the resin parts there are copious stencils to apply to the bodies, and as usual a painting and decaling guide is printed on the front of the instructions, with colour call-outs in Gunze codes. Detail on the fins and bomb bodies is excellent, with different types of rivets evident on the casing, plus a fine rendition of the folded fins on the tail. You will need to remove the bombs from the casting stubs with a fine saw, and if you are concerned about the butt-joints fitting well, simply make the centres concave to reduce the likelihood of this happening. As usual, take the precaution of wearing a mask when cutting or sanding resin, as the tiny particles are harmful to your health if breathed in. Washing the parts in warm water will also improve the adhesion of paint, as there may still be some moulding release agent on the parts when you receive them. Review sample courtesy of
  12. P-38F Cockpit (648277 for Academy) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Academy's Lightning kits are about your best bet in 1:48, even though the original tooling dates back to the 90s, which probably helps explain the relatively sparse detail in the kit cockpit. Here comes Eduard with a new cockpit set to put that right, as under the large blister canopy, a lot of the detail will be visible if you managed to keep the glazing clear. The set arrives in the familiar Brassin rectangular box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between, doubling additional protection. Inside the box are three bags of resin parts, plus a bag of pre-painted nickel-plated Photo-Etch (PE) and a small decal sheet containing a few cockpit stencils. There are twenty grey resin parts, plus two in clear resin, all of which appear to have been mastered using 3D processes, resulting in incredible detail that is far more crisp than even the best traditional masters. Casting is first rate too, with no bubbles, and some tubular parts that are so thin you wonder how the resin would find its way through them. Construction begins with a complete set of pre-painted PE seatbelts, which attach to the resin chair, fixed to the cockpit floor with fine tubular frames and a portion of the main spar at the rear. The rear deck and its finely detailed radio gear is separated from the pilot by head armour and a small circular cushion, with each section locking together using keyed tabs to ensure a concise fit. A set of rudder pedals, laminated pre-printed PE instrument panel, control yoke, and detailed sidewalls go together to create the finished tub, which drops into the fuselage "pod" after the coaming is removed from the kit part. Additional detail is added to the sidewalls before installation, providing throttle quadrants, plus a few other knobs & bobs. The canopy is detailed with a gunsight as well as a section of the roll-over hoop in PE, which will require a little care with the glue. Review sample courtesy of
  13. B-17G Engines/Wheels/Turbochargers 1:72 Eduard Brassin (For Airfix Kit) These new sets are for the new Airfix 1/72 B-17G. Wheels Set (672120) This set contains both main wheels and the tail wheel in resin along with a set of painting masks. Engines Set (672131) This is a comprehensive set to replace all four main engine units for the B-17G, included are engines with seperate nacelles and cowling flap rings. There are 24 resin parts and photo-etched details. To build these up first the wiring harness is applied to the engine, and a front PE ring as well which has to be bent from straight rod. Two seperate resin parts are then added to each engine front. The exhaust ring is then added to the rear of then engine. The cowl flaps are then added to the rear of this assembly. The engine is then added to the wing. The nacelles can be added over the engines as needed. Turbochargers (672133) This 6 part resin set replaces the prominent turbocharges on the B-17. Conclusion Whether you use one or all of these sets the results should be an improvement over the kit parts. All are of the consistent high quality we now expect from the Brassin range. The casting on the engines is particularity good. Highly Recommended. Review samples courtesy of
  14. SC 50 German WWII Bombs 1:72 Eduard Brassin SC 50 (672115) The SC 50 was a standard bomb with a nominal weight of 50Kgs used by the Luftwaffe in WWII. It features a one piece drawn steel body with an explosive filler. This set from Eduard in their brassin range contains 8 bombs with 4 additional small parts per bomb. The small parts are quite fragile and one was broke off in this set. The small parts fit inside the bomb fins . Decals for the markings are also included. Conclusion Quality ordnance is always welcome and these bombs will add some great detail to any model which needs to carry them. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  15. Harrier Upgrades/Pods (for Eduard/Hasegawa) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Designed and released to coincide with their limited edition boxing of Hasegawa's 1:48 Harrier GR.7/9 kit, these four sets have been produced to improve further over the already augmented detail of the boxing. If detail is your thing, then these sets might just hit the spot. Upgrade Set (49784) As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) sets, this arrives in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. It consists of one large sheet of brass, plus a small slip of clear acetate with parts pre-printed on the surface. The set includes skins for the cockpit tub; splitter plates and details for the kit exhaust nozzles; a highly detailed rendition of the protective plates behind the "hot" nozzles; upgrade parts for the landing gear; a more detailed brake surface for under the belly; pylon details; missile exhausts; HUD parts with film for the glass, and a full set of slime-lights with matching decals (not pictured). The Brassin sets arrive in the familiar Brassin clamshell box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between the two halves, doubling as the header card with decals if appropriate. Exhaust Nozzles (648267) Four resin nozzles are included in the box, which are direct replacements for the two part kit nozzles, so not only do you avoid having to fill the seams, but you also get a much better level of detail into the bargain. Sniper ATP for Harrier GR.7/9 (648273) Harrier used this target designation pod extensively, and this set contains all the necessary parts with the adapter rail that is required for attachment to the Harrier. The main body is cut from its pouring plug and the join is covered by a PE part, with an optional "black box" on the aft end, while the movable seeker head and PE lens is fitted into the recess in the front. Then the glazing parts in clear resin are prepared by adding a bevel to their edges as shown in the accompanying diagram, before gluing to the lip around the edges of the window. The adapter rail, sway-braces and pylon are fixed to the top of the pod body, with some small PE parts providing extra detail. If you wanted to pose the pod in its deployed mode, simply turn the seeker head windows to the downward position using your references. TERMA Pod (648266) The TERMA defence pod isn't exclusively used by the Harrier, so it has uses with other aircraft, but it is carried by it, so it has been included here. Inside the box are two resin parts and a small fret of pre-painted PE. The pod is liberated from its casting blocks, then glued together to form the pod body. The PE parts are then affixed to the exterior, which is best done after main painting is completed due to them being pre-printed. Review sample courtesy of
  16. SC 50 German WWII Bombs (648264) 1:48 Eduard Brassin The SC50 was a general purpose free-fall bomb used widely by the Luftwaffe in WWII, weighing roughly 50kg. This set of eight resin bombs from Eduard's Brassin line arrives in the familiar Brassin clamshell box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between the two halves, doubling as the header card. Inside are the eight bomb bodies with integral fins, plus optional "Screamers" that were attached to the tail fins in pairs, as if having bombs dropped on you wasn't scary enough! There are four casting blocks of the screamers, and each bomb is supplied on its own casting block that is very lightly to the tail fins with the finest possible gates. As usual with Eduard, the painting guide gives Gunze call-outs, and shows where the included coloured stripes on the decal sheet should go, along with a few small stencils in black. Review sample courtesy of
  17. Meteor F.8 Wheels (648272) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Airfix's new Meatbox is a grand little kit, but styrene isn't perfect for getting nicely detailed wheels or their mudguards. Resin works superbly for those applications, and Eduard have long since recognised this, with a wide range of resin wheels in their Brassin range. The set arrives in the familiar Brassin clamshell box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between the two halves, doubling as the header card. The box contains eight resin parts on five casting blocks, with two main wheels and one nose wheel, all having moulded-in hubs, with separate wafer-thin mudguards. The final two parts are rather small axle caps that sit inboard. A set of kabuki tape masks completes the set with six tyre masks for clean demarcation between the tyres and hubs. Construction is almost drop-fit, although you do have to add a small length of 0.5mm wire to represent the hoop that holds the lower end of the mudguards in place. It sits in a U-shape, wrapping around the end of the guard, and fixes to the gear leg's yoke, which is about the only fiddly part. The tyres are superbly detailed with tread, sidewall detail, maker's mark and tyre data in raised relief on the sidewalls. A scrap diagram shows the correct orientation of the completed assembly, and the paint call-outs can either be taken from the Airfix instructions, or from the set's instructions that use Gunze Mr Color codes as construction goes along. Review sample courtesy of
  18. P-40B Wheels & Exhausts (for Airfix) 1:48 Eduard Brassin The new Airfix kit is on the starting blocks, and is due to become available on the 16th September 2016, also known as next week at time of writing. Eduard seem to be on the ball with Airfix of late, often beating them to the shops with aftermarket sets, and this kit is no exception. Two resin sets are out already in the Brassin range, which arrives in the familiar clamshell box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between the two halves, doubling as the header card. P-40B Wheels (648270) These are straight-forward replacements for the kit parts, which replace the kit wheels directly, adding additional detail, such as raised tyre sidewall markings and crisply moulded spoked hubs. There are also a set of hub covers that were often worn by the Warhawk, and these are provided on a small Photo-Etch (PE) fret in brass. Of course one of the big pluses with a set of resin wheels is the lack of seam around even one piece tyres, like those supplied in the kit. There is the clean-up of the resin to content with of course, but Eduard's moulding blocks are cleverly made to minimise this, and clean-up is a breeze. The spoked wheels have a little flash over the open areas, which just need cutting or sanding back to reveal the detailed inner-hub behind it. A tail wheel is also included, which shares the same detail upgrades as the main wheels. As a bonus you get a set of yellow kabuki tape masks (not pictured) that will allow you to paint your hubs after the tyres and get a nice easy, sharp demarcation. P-40B Exhaust Stacks (648271) Injection moulding makes it difficult to create hollow exhaust stacks in styrene without moulding them in two parts, which usually leads to them not bothering, which is the case with this kit. You could of course drill them out yourself, but the chances of getting all 12 holes right in the middle is minimal unless you are a modelling god with the most steady hands. This set does all that work for you, giving you two exhaust stacks in resin on one casting block, with a subtle flare of the tips, and fine detail at the base of the part, representing the inside of the exhaust port. Cut off the parts, flat the back and attach them with super glue, and then all you need to do is paint them realistically to depict the level of use your chosen subject has endured. Review sample courtesy of
  19. Hello, Thought I'd start building something a bit more relaxing after the Flanker, so at the Moson show in Hungary I've bought this beautiful eduard's kit - with all the extras. I am planning to build it as opened as possible - engine, cockpit, radio, gunbays, misc. panels and so on. So, starting with the cutting, cleaning and thinning all the resin bits and pieces and dryfitting them over and over again. So, this is my Moson show loot, most of the parts here are for Spit. Too much of them really... So, brassin radio compartment with Aires cockpit test fitted... brassin parts just slot into the position, they fit the eduard kit perfectly. And Aires gunbays (just dryfitted, not glued yet) I think I will thin the plastic a bit more...
  20. Fw 190A-5 Engine Set & Fuselage Guns Set 1:72 Eduard Brassin These sets are both designed for the new Eduard Kit. Engine Set This set provides a complete replacement engine and cowlings for the kit. There is a sheet of photo-etch and an amazing 21 resin parts. The casting on the resin is superb, some of the best from Eduard I have seen. There is a complete engine, mounting brackets and separate cowlings to be displayed of the model. A new resin front cowl, gear box and all new resin exhaust are included for the engine, and a new firewall for the airframe. The photo-etch fret provides the wiring harness for the engine as well as a myriad of small connector parts. Fuselage Guns Set This set provides a replacement set for the fuselage guns of the Fw 190. There is a sheet of phot-etch and 15 resin parts. All the resin parts are superbly moulded. As well as replacement guns there is a replacement fire wall, engine mounts, and back engine part which is seen when this area is open. There are two different gun covers provided but frustratingly nothing in the instructions indicating why, or which to use? The photo-etch sheet provides frames for the side of gun bay, and fixings for the guns & engine. There is also a frame for the front canopy. Combo If the modeller really want to push the boat out and invest in both of these sets then they are available boxed together. Conclusion The new Eduard Fw 190A-5 kit is great in it's own right. These sets will bring it up to a whole new level. Highly Recommended. Review samples courtesy of
  21. Bf.109G External Fuel Tanks (648265) 1:48 Eduard Brassin The 109G often carried an addition fuel tank to extend its range, and these tended to be under the belly on a small "hump" that attached to the underside of the aircraft with a fuel feed and the option to ditch the tank if necessary. The tanks were aerodynamically shaped, with a streamlined rear which often had a flat bottom to give extra ground clearance when taxiing. The set arrives in the familiar Brassin clamshell box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between the two halves, doubling as the header card and protecting the small decal sheet. There are two tanks in the box, representing one of each type, with two pylons, allowing you to use them on two models. To apply the tanks to your model, you need to first remove the four lugs from the underside of the wings, and drill a small hole in the centreline for the location lug that's moulded into the underside of the pylon. Removing the pouring stubs from the resin parts should be simple, as the tanks have five small connections to the plug, which should clean up easily. The pylon has its moulding stub attached on the underside, which makes life easier from a point of view of clean-up. The tank and pylon are glued together by four pegs, and the decals are applied to the bottom and sides of the tank, with locations shown on a scrap diagram which also shows the correct colours using Gunze Sangyo colours. The decals on my sample were slightly damaged due to the protective paper adhering to the sheet, removal of which did a little damage. Check yours before you go tugging at them, as you can probably do a better job by soaking the paper off when it comes time to apply the decals. As usual, take the precaution of wearing a mask when cutting or sanding resin, as the tiny particles are harmful to your health if breathed in. Washing the parts in warm water will also improve the adhesion of paint, as there may still be some moulding release agent on the parts when you receive them. Review sample courtesy of
  22. Multiple Ejector Racks 1:72 Eduard Brassin The Multiple Ejector Rack or MER is used to attach upto six weapons to a single aircraft pylon. Eduard have produced these in resin & photo-etch to give a highly detailed unit. 3 complete racks are included in this package along with the data stencils. Conclusion These are highly detailed units and should improve the look of any model they are used on. Highly Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  23. Mk.77 Bombs 1:72 Eduard Brassin The Mk.77 is the modern day successor to the Vietnam era Napalm bombs. Where Napalm was a mixture of gasoline, polystyrene, and benzene; the Mk.77 uses a kerosene based fuel with a rumoured oxidiser added to make it harder to extinguish. Mk.77s were first deployed in Iraq (despite this being initially denied) and later in Afghanistan. This set from the Brassin arm of Eduard offers a pair of Mk.77 bombs and the fuse tips which are moulded as separate parts. Conclusion This is a great weapons package from Eduard. These parts should enhance any F-4, or other kit you can think of. Highly Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  24. F-4 Armaments Set 1:72 Eduard Brassin This set from the Brassin arm of Eduard seems to offer a one stop shop to tool out you 1/72 F-4 with missiles and dumb bombs. The set offers 4 Sidewinder AIM-9B, 4 Sparrow AIM-7E and 18 Mk.82 bombs. The sidewinders have the rear fins moulded on and the front ones as photo-etch. The Sparrows have the rear fins moulded on, with the front ones in resin. Both missiles have photo-etch exhaust parts. The bombs have three types of fuse each all in resin. The parts are all upto Eduard's usual standard, with crisp castings and should pose no problems. Full decals are provided for the missiles & bombs. Although for the F-4, many other aircraft carried these weapons. Conclusion This is a great weapons package from Eduard. These parts should enhance any F-4, or other kit you can think of. Highly Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  25. AS.34 Kormoran 1 (648249) 1:48 Eduard Brassin The Kormoran is an anti-ship missile, which can also be re-purposed to land attack if necessary, and is currently used on the Tornado, with a newer version the Kormoran 2 introduced in the 1980s. The set arrives in the familiar Brassin clamshell box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between the two halves, doubling as the header card. Two resin missile bodies are included in the box, with sufficient of the smaller and larger fins included for them both. The fins slot neatly into place inside deep recesses on the body to give them strength, and the exhaust is depicted by a small piece of Photo-Etch (PE) that is shaped to the rear angle. The missiles were either white or olive drab, and are stencilled accordingly with colour call-outs in Gunze codes. Review sample courtesy of