Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Search the Community

Showing results for tags '54mm'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Group Builds
  • Model Show Calendar

Forums

  • Site Help & Support
    • FAQs
    • Help & Support
    • New Members
    • Announcements
  • Aircraft Modelling
    • Military Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Civil Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Aircraft
    • Ready for Inspection - Aircraft
    • Aircraft Related Subjects
  • AFV Modelling (armour, military vehicles & artillery)
    • Armour Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Armour
    • Ready for Inspection - Armour
    • Armour Related Subjects
    • large Scale AFVs (1:16 and above)
  • Maritime Modelling (Ships and subs)
    • Maritime Discussion by era
    • Work in Progress - Maritime
    • Ready for Inspection - Maritime
  • Vehicle Modelling (non-military)
    • Vehicle Discussion
    • Work In Progress - Vehicles
    • Ready For Inspection - Vehicles
  • Science Fiction & RealSpace
    • Science Fiction Discussion
    • RealSpace Discussion
    • Work In Progress - SF & RealSpace
    • Ready for Inspection - SF & RealSpace
  • Figure Modelling
    • Figure Discussion
    • Figure Work In Progress
    • Figure Ready for Inspection
  • Dioramas, Vignettes & Scenery
    • Diorama Chat
    • Work In Progress - Dioramas
    • Ready For Inspection - Dioramas
  • Reviews, News & Walkarounds
    • Reviews
    • Current News
    • Build Articles
    • Tips & Tricks
    • Walkarounds
  • Modelling
    • Group Builds
    • The Rumourmonger
    • Other Modelling Genres
    • Britmodeller Yearbooks
    • Tools & Tips
  • General Discussion
    • Chat
    • Shows
    • Photography
    • Members' Wishlists
  • Shops, manufacturers & vendors
    • Air-craft.net
    • A.M.U.R. Reaver
    • Atlantic Models
    • Bernd.M Modellbau
    • BlackMike Models
    • Casemate UK
    • Copper State Models
    • Creative Models Ltd
    • DACO Products
    • Freightdog Models
    • Hannants
    • Hobby Colours & Accessories
    • Hobby Paint'n'Stuff
    • Hypersonic Models
    • Iliad Design
    • Japan:Cool
    • Kagero Publishing
    • Kingkit
    • L'Arsenal 2.0
    • Modellingtools.co.uk
    • Maketar Paint Masks
    • Marmaduke Press Decals
    • MikroMir
    • MJW Models
    • The Hobby Shack
    • NeOmega & Vector Resin
    • Parkes682Decals
    • Pheon Models
    • Pocketbond Limited
    • Precision Ice and Snow
    • Radu Brinzan Productions
    • Red Roo Models
    • RES/KIT
    • SBS Model - Hungary
    • Scale-Model-Kits.com
    • Small Stuff Models
    • Sovereign Hobbies
    • Special Hobby
    • Sphere Products
    • Starling Models
    • Thunderbird Models
    • Tiger Hobbies
    • Tirydium Models
    • Topnotch - Bases and Masks for Models
    • Ultimate Modelling Products
    • Valiant Wings Publishing
    • Videoaviation Italy
    • White Ensign Models
    • Wonderland Models
  • Archive
    • 2007 Group Builds
    • 2008 Group Builds
    • 2009 Group Builds
    • 2010 Group Builds
    • 2011 Group Builds
    • 2012 Group Builds
    • 2013 Group Builds

Categories

  • New Features
  • Other

Found 37 results

  1. Strictly OOB, except I substituted lead foil for the plastic belts. Painted in acrylics.
  2. Painted with Andrea, Vallejo and Humbrol acrylics.
  3. This kit was originally tooled in 1975 and was released from 1975 to 1978, possibly reissued in 1980, and again from 1991 to 1994. History: The ordinary line infantry made all of Napoleon's victories possible. The Bardin uniform was introduced into the French army from 1812. The square-lapelled short-tailed coatee and the trousers were in common usage. By 1815 the French infantry wore a double-breasted short-tailed jacket or habit-veste in blue with red collar and cuffs piped white. White lapels piped red and white turnbacks. Brass buttons. White waistcoat and breeches. Most infantry at Waterloo wore greatcoats. The gaiters were shortened to end below the knee before 1815. Shako. The rolled forage cap was kept under the M.1801 cartridge pouch with the red tassel hanging out below, and they would have a canteen or flask or mess tin. While such things were not issued by the army, almost everyone carried these essential items in one form or another. They had the M.1777 musket and bayonet with 406mm blade. The fusiliers carried their bayonet on the lower part of their crossbelt on the front right hip and did not have a sabre. The M.1801 knapsack was made from cow hide with two (and later three) straps. The greatcoat rolled on top and held by the straps. The voltigeurs still wore a sabre despite repeated orders to the contrary. The elite grenadiers and voltigeurs still wore pompons, which again was common despite having permission to wear plumes. The light infantry - chasseurs - have a sabre and bayonet combined frog suspended by a belt over the right shoulder, and also fringed epaulettes, which mark them out as elites. In reality the uniform was often far less smart than this by Waterloo, and in particular many men wore trousers over the breeches and gaiters, and a cover on the shako. Reference: Brassey’s History of Uniforms Napoleonic Wars Napoleon’s Army ISBN 1-85753-220-1
  4. This kit was originally tooled in 1973 and was released from 1973 to 1978, briefly in 1980, and again from 1991 to 1994. This is packaged in a blister pack. The instructions are printed on the reverse, with assembly in 6 sections. The moulded parts are in white plastic. There is some flash, but details are well depicted, and two sheets of thin plastic card are included for the belts and straps. Options include parade or campaign uniforms and the possibility of making different poses. In addition, this kit has excellent conversion possibilities. History: During the 1815 campaign the Foot Grenadiers were organised into two battalions, each having four companies of 150 men plus 10 officers (1er and 2e Batallions, 1er Régiment de Grenadiers (Old Guard) 1280 officers and men). Uniform consisted of a bearskin with a semi-circular bronze plate, white cords, red plume, red top patch with yellow (white) grenade. Special blue-within red-within white cockade with gold crowned eagle at the centre. Dark blue coat and collar, white lapels and three-pointed cuff flaps, red cuffs and turnbacks, red, fringed epaulettes, white small clothes and belts, gold grenades on the turnbacks. Brass buttons; white and black gaiters, blue great coat and forage cap with white piping, orange lace edging turnup and orange grenade edged white in front; cartridge box with bronze/brass eagle and small grenade in each corner. Reference: AN ILLUSTRATED ENCYCLOPEDIA OF UNIFORMS OF THE NAPOLEONIC WARS ISBN 0-7548-1571-4
  5. The Black Watch

    This kit was originally tooled in 1972 and was released from 1973 to 1978 and again from 1991 to 1994. My first purchase was from MR & ME Models in Kempston, probably around 2006. It is blister packed and in good condition. Construction is illustrated in six stages. The mouldings are in white plastic on two runners. A choice of arms is provided; the parts have fine detail and parts should be interchangeable with other kits in this series. Thin plastic sheet is included for the various belts and straps. Shoulder straps with wings for grenadiers are provided along with the worsted tufts worn by centre companies. History: In 1809 the Highland corps consisted of the 42nd, 78th, 79th, 92nd and 93rd regiments. In addition to the kilt these Scottish troops also wore feathered bonnets with red, white and black, diced headband. Black ostrich feather top with plume and cockade on the left. Tartans of the era were all derived from the official Black Watch (the Military Sett) with various white, yellow or red lines added to provide a regimental distinction; the 42nd being a red line in the sett to indicate grenadier status. Hose was red and white diced. Their officers had crimson silk sashes from the left shoulder to the right hip. They were mounted and wore trews. On campaign a normal shako with a three-line deep red, white and black dicing around often replaced their expensive feather bonnets. When the Battle of Waterloo started, the Union Brigade was posted to the rear of Picton's infantry division; the Greys at the left rear of the Inniskillings, who were in line with the Royals on their right. Pack's Brigade of Picton's division, consisting of the 55th, 92nd (Gordon’s), 42nd (Black Watch) and 1st Foot (Royal Scots), were in front of the Inniskilling Dragoons and Greys. The Royal Dragoons were further to the right, behind Kempt's Brigade (28th Foot, 79th (Cameron’s) and 32nd Foot). Reference: BRITISH INFANTRY UNIFORMS Since 1660 ISBN 0 7137 1127 2 pages 59-60 AN ILLUSTRATED ENCYCLOPEDIA OF UNIFORMS OF THE NAPOLEONIC WARS page 93 WELLINGTON’S ARMY plate 32 Brassey’s History of Uniforms Napoleonic Wars Wellington’s Army ISBN 1-85753-221-X page page 126/7 BRITISH MILITARY UNIFORMS From Contemporary Pictures plate 71
  6. This was bought on e-bay. It is packaged in a blister card, with two sprues of white mouldings. The six assembly stages are illustrated on the header and a small sheet of Plastikard is provided. The figure is nicely sculpted with crisp detail, but some flash evident. This kit was first released from 1971 to 1978 and again from 1991 to 1994. History: At the start of the nineteenth century and the short-tailed, single-breasted jacket was worn. Officers, however, retained the long-tailed coat. Traditionally, hair had been worn in a pigtail, but these were abolished, to the relief of the rank and file, in 1808. The Belgic shako with tall front plate was adopted in 1812 and a short-tailed, single-breasted jacket replaced the old-fashioned long-tailed coat. Officers, however, retained the long-tailed coat. Grey overalls replaced white breeches and gaiters. All regiments of the line wore red tunics with white turnbacks. Facings were worn on collars, cuffs and shoulder straps; collars and shoulder straps were edged in white lace. The centre companies wore a white, worsted tuft at the outer end on the shoulder strap, and a white-over-red tuft on the shako. The two flank companies wore wings in the facing colour, edged and barred in white tape and often having worsted tufts all along their outer edges. The light company wore a green tuft and a small hunting horn badge. There is evidence that these elite company badges were worn on the shoulder wings and the tunic turnbacks as well. This kit is moulded to represent an infantryman of the 2nd Foot Guards (Coldstream) one of the battalions of Guards at the Battle of Waterloo. The Coldstream was the 2nd regiment of Guards Infantry and had buttons and laces in pairs. Their shoulders were decorated with dark blue wings (their facing colour) edged and decorated with white tape. Reference: Airfix Magazine February 1974 page 355 AN ILLUSTRATED ENCYCLOPEDIA OF UNIFORMS OF THE NAPOLEONIC WARS ISBN 0-7548-1571-4 page 100 WELLINGTON’S ARMY ISBN 1-85367-501-6 plate 26, 31 Brassey’s History of Uniforms Napoleonic Wars Wellington’s Army ISBN 1-85753-221-X page 18 BRITISH INFANTRY UNIFORMS Since 1660 ISBN 0 7137 1127 2 plate 35 Sgt Coldstream Guards, 1815
  7. This kit was first issued from 1975 to 1978 and made a brief reappearance in 1980. I suppose that brief period of five years makes this something of a collector’s piece, though it does not yet demand high prices on auction sites and can be bought second hand for a reasonable price. History: Some of the 1768 Clothing Warrant included more loosely fitting coats, turned-down collars, narrower lapels, round cuffs, turned back skirts and white waistcoats and breeches. The model represents a Grenadier of the 5th Foot (Royal Northumberland Fusiliers). This regiment was in America at the outbreak of the War of Independence and fought at Bunker Hill, Lexington and Brandywine among other battles. The bearskin cap has a metal plate bearing the Royal crest and Nec Aspera Terrent in silver. A Sergeant’s rank is indicated by plain white lace and a sash with facing stripe worn under the coat. Light companies were added to each regiment in 1770. They wore shorter coats and special leather caps encircled by chains, tan belts, powder horn and hatchet were peculiar to these companies. Black half-gaiters, originally confined to light infantry, were adopted by all companies on service in preference to the long variety ordered in 1768. From 1776, the hair of all ranks was tied in the style known as clubbed. Powdering continued until abolished in 1795. Reference: BRITISH INFANTRY UNIFORMS Since 1660 ISBN 0 7137 1127 2
  8. Hi all, The European soldier with a halberd, 1510-25 CHRONOS MINIATURES, 54 mm, resin Cheers, Martin
  9. Hi all DRAKKAR RAIDER Andrea miniatures, 54 mm, metal. Cheers, Martin
  10. Hi everyone. The Cossack with a lashRatnik manufacturer. 54 mm, white metal.It is painted for the customer. Best regards, Martin
  11. Taking another run at a figure. [/IMG] Here is what I have so far. I have tried for a tanned/sunburnt color on the skin, as this unit was in Palestine before going to Peshewar for operations against Afridi tribes in the 'Red Shirt' episode. A medium orange, a green-tinted buff , raw umber, and white were the basic palette, with small amounts of ultra-marine blue and black as well. All over Tamiya Fine White primer. I intend to move on to the the uniform and gear next. I like to think I have managed some improvement in doing a face. I only had to strip the head once this time. Paint got too thick, and eyes were too big. Stripped the right eye (figure's right) and re-did it, after the face was painted (it was a bit lower than seemed right). I had one bit of adventure with this. I don't spray much, and step out onto the porch when I do (or down to the basement in winter). I had the head attached before priming, and I managed to drop the figure on the porch. The head came off and scooted into a crack between the porch decking and the rear wall. A rather bad moment. I was able to spot it with a flash-light, and retrieve it with a long tweezers, fortunately....
  12. I don't do figures often, so when I do get one, it's because I really want to do one, and therefore I tend to pile straight in whatever else I may have planned or on the plate. I have had some interest in the Naval Division at Antwerp since back in high school, when I came upon an article on it in an academic history magazine in the school library, and then read Mr. Churchill's history of the Great War. I was interested to discover the Tommy's War people did a figure of an enlisted man in the unit, and found I could get one from a state-side supplier. There was a pretty significant mould mis-alignment on the legs.... I dealt with this as my first step, it being something I know how to do.... After this comes the tricky bit (ie just about everything else...).... I started with the eyes and face because if these aren't at least passable, nothing else is going to matter much. I am pretty much a duffer at figures, and will spare you the preliminaries: what is pictured here represents the result after the third complete stripping of the face down to white primer.... I'm going to put head aside for a bit, so I can come at it with fresh eyes. I expect I will try and get a little more dark color at the edges of the eye-lids, and perhaps a couple more touches of glaze/wash on the cheeks and chin. But next on the agenda is putting on the arms and beginning to paint the clothes.
  13. I don't do figures often, so when I do get one, it's because I really want to do one, and therefore I tend to pile straight in whatever else I may have planned or on the plate. I have had some interest in the Naval Division at Antwerp since back in high school, when I came upon an article on it in an academic history magazine in the school library, and then read Mr. Churchill's history of the Great War. I was interested to discover the Tommy's War people did a figure of an enlisted man in the unit, and found I could get one from a state-side supplier. There was a pretty significant mould mis-alignment on the legs.... I dealt with this as my first step, it being something I know how to do.... After this came the tricky bit (ie just about everything else...).... I started with the eyes and face because if these aren't at least passable, nothing else is going to matter much. I am pretty much a duffer at figures, and will spare you the preliminaries: what is pictured here represents the result after the third complete stripping of the face down to white primer.... I'm going to put this aside for a bit, so I can come at it with fresh eyes. I expect I will try and get a little more dark color at the edges of the eye-lids, and perhaps a couple more touches of glaze/wash on the cheeks and chin.
  14. Been enjoying watching the great builds in this GB and realised there's no plucky Tommies in the mix yet! So I'm going to jump in with a Sergeant, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, Ploegsteert 1915 by Tommy's War. I've made one of their figures before, for the Non-injected GB, and they are lovely, beautifully sculpted and molded. Not a huge amount to the construction, most of the work will be in the painting and I think I'll do a nice little base. Got some suitable reference material and am raring to go! Cheers Segan
  15. The 23rd Regiment of Foot was raised in 1689 by the regimentation of some existing companies; its title of Royal Welsh Fusileers (sic – Fuzileers was also used in the Army List of the time, now Welch Fusiliers) originated in 1714. It served in San Domingo, in the expedition to North Holland in 1799, and in Egypt. A second Battalion was formed and served in the Corunna and Walcheren campaigns, but the first Battalion’s service was more extensive, including Copenhagen (1807), Martinique (1809) and from July 1810 in the Peninsula, originally with the first Division but from that October with the 4th, perhaps most notably at Albuera, though it won eight other Peninsula battle honours. It also fought at Waterloo.
  16. Just back from my hols and I thought I would jump in with this. 2 months till the end of the GB so I should be able to get it done. Seem to be on a bit of a figure making/painting jaunt at the moment. This is the very nice 54mm Sergeant of the Suffolk Regiment at Le Cateau 1914, by Tommy's War. It's the first model I've bought off them and I don't think it will be the last. Cast in very nice grey resin, cant see any bubbles or defects. Also comes with a PE harness for the rifle. Cheers Segan
  17. Converted in 1840 to the East India Company service as the 6th Bengal Irregular Cavalry. They were granted an Honorary Standard for service in Sind in 1844, bearing the device of a lion 'passant regardant'. As part of the 1861 reforms it was added to the regular establishment as the 4th Regiment of Bengal Cavalry. The 4th's first battle honour is Afghanistan North-West Frontier 1879-80 for service during the Second Afghan War. They went through four changes of title between 1900 and 1904, initially owing to the regiment being rearmed with the lance. Mine represents the 4th Bengal Lancers around this time.
  18. Town People

    I picked these up last month, cheaply because the set was incomplete. Some google searching revealed the origin of the figures and I painted them up for around the turn of the 18th to 19th Century. I'm not really sure of the dates for the actual fashions they're wearing... Missing/additional pieces were taken from my Airfix 54mm spares.
  19. Hussars enjoyed great popularity, particularly in the French army. Their name means corsairs, pirates or raiders, derived from the Mongol hoards. These excellent horsemen scoured ahead of the main army, striking terror into the enemy populous. They wore a wolf’s skin across their left shoulder as a light shield. This was replaced by the pelisse – itself a corruption of pelz or animal skin. They wore long moustaches and their hair was worn in cadanettes; three plaits, one at the rear and one in front of each ear.
  20. The 13th Cuirassiers were formed in 1808 from the 1er Régiment Provisoire de Grosse Cavalerie and saw lengthy service in the Peninsula. It was there that this fellow acquired his brown trousers, manufactured like so many overalls and jackets in this theatre of war, from confiscated monks’ habit fabric. Saddlery was natural leather. The cuirassier helmet consisted of an iron cap surrounded by a fur turban, with a copper crest surmounted by a horsehair mane. There were regimental variations as each regiment determined their own specification. The plume for the 13th was scarlet, tipped white (1810). Facings for the 13th were Burgundy or wine red displayed on collar and cuffs. Sheep or deer-hide breeches were reserved for parade dress, replaced by overalls when on the march and campaigning. I don’t know whether cuirassiers carried colours, but this chap has decided to ride with a flag. His shabraque and bedding roll are incorrect for a cuirassier, but they were all I had to hand.
  21. Officer, elite squadron (Gard du Corps) German Light Horse 1807 - 1809 The original uniform consisted of a Polish lancer-style cream kurtka, faced in amaranth (a form of pink), with white wool epaulettes and pewter buttons. The czapska was of the usual style, covered in amaranth cloth and bedecked with a white plume with amaranth tip. The elite company was distinguished by white loops about the lapel buttons and a white aiguillette. This uniform was short-lived with white cloth replacing the cream. This figure consists of the head and torso of the Airfix 54mm Polish Lancer, arms and legs from the 95th Rifleman.
  22. The 11th Light Dragoons were the first regiment to become Hussars outright in 1840. Uniforms had changed little by the time of the Crimean War (1840 – 1854). I chose to model this figure as a Sergeant of the 11th Hussars, 1854, dressed in home service marching order of full dress with certain modifications. His pelisse is absent, having been left on board the transports and not retrieved until after Balaclava. A cap pouch for the Victoria percussion carbine was worn on the right of the sword belt. Only Hussars wore the sabretache in the Crimea. The 11th was the first regiment to receive the busby, made of brown fur and 9” high with crimson bag, gold or yellow cap-lines and gilt or brass chin-chain. The upright feather was white above crimson, but was not worn in the Crimea. Overalls were crimson or cherry, worn by all ranks in all orders of dress, and had two gold or yellow stripes. Saddlecloths were of black lambskin. The men had haversacks and water bottles, the 1821 sword and Victoria carbine.
  23. His profession is indicated by the red horse-shoe patch on the right upper sleeve of his plain stable jacket. He wears the Pokalem fatigue cap, which was common to both lancers and dragoons, proving more practical than its predecessor. The crossed lances on the front were sometimes replaced by the regimental number. This figure was compiled from various components. I think that the Pokalem fatigue cap is Historex. The head was taken from my 1/35 spares. The torso and arms are from the Airfix French Line Infantryman. The kneeling legs from the British 95th Rifleman and his hammer-type tool was scratch-built. I merely glued some grass mat to the base with PVA.
×