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Found 26 results

  1. It is easy to be wise after the event, and it is in some such light that one cannot help viewing the probable work of the Firebrand in the Pacific had not Japan surrendered. As it is, this aircraft has not had a chance to prove its formidable capabilities against our erstwhile active enemies. That the aircraft is formidable there can be no doubt and the writer cannot help but feel a twinge of regret that circumstances, past and recent, prevented it from demonstrating the quality of its powers. - Flight, September 27th 1945 It was never my favourite aeroplane, and we would have been very poorly placed if it had been necessary to go to war strapped to such a lumbering giant. - Cdr Maurice Tibby I like Firebrands. To me it’s one of those rare aircraft that unfortunately did not benefit from the ‘if it looks right…’ rule of thumb. Despite looking very much the part of the capable carrier strike aircraft, it was rather lacking in too many respects. As far as appearances go though, in my opinion it’s a winner. The front half resembles a leaner Sea Fury, without the camel hump rather detracts from the latter’s lines. Even that barn door of a fin doesn’t entirely diminish the overall impression of ruggedness. The choice in 1/48 is limited to Magna’s resin offering, and the various online reviews of said kit don’t inspire a massive desire to search out an example. I seem to remember, at a SMW long ago, that Dynavector showed a prototype master for the Firebrand for their next vac release. Sadly they exited the kit business not long afterwards. For a while I’ve idly entertained the possibility of scratchbuilding a Firebrand, and recently I’ve made some small movements in actually doing something about it. Time will tell whether it gets very far. I don’t expect this to progress rapidly, so if you’re tempted to use the ‘popcorn’ emoji then be sure to stock up. If in the meantime someone goes ahead and releases a decent kit, then no one will be happier than I. Anyway, the current intention is to 3D print some of the more complex parts (propeller blades, cowling perhaps) and use ‘traditional’ scratchbuilding techniques for other parts of the airframe. That notwithstanding, I think it’s likely that I shall end up drafting most of the airframe in 3D, since I think this might be useful for scratchbuilding purposes (e.g. for creating bulkheads, ribs, and other cross sections). To do this I’m getting to grips with a couple of free 3D packages, namely Autodesk’s 123D and Fusion 360. Of which more later. Expect this thread to be a series of semi-random posts as I flit back and forth between research, 3D modelling and, eventually, perhaps even some proper plastic bashing. By no means do I consider myself a Firebrand expert (plus I’m learning the software as I go along), so if anyone has any hints or advice in either area they would be most welcome. cheers, Jason
  2. SMS Battleship Baden Kagero Super Drawings in 3D SMS Baden[ was a Bayern-class dreadnought battleship of the German Imperial Navy built during World War I. Launched in October 1915 and completed in March 1917, she was the last battleship completed for use in the war; two of her sisters—Sachsen and Württemberg—were incomplete when the war ended. The ship mounted eight 38-centimeter (15 in) guns in four twin turrets, displaced 32,200 metric tons (31,700 long tons; 35,500 short tons) at full combat load, and had a top speed of 21 knots (39 km/h; 24 mph). Along with her sister Bayern, Baden was the largest and most powerfully armed battleship built by the Imperial Navy. Upon commissioning into the High Seas Fleet, Baden was made the fleet flagship, replacing Friedrich der Grosse. Baden saw little action during her short career; the only major sortie in April 1918 ended without any combat. Following the German collapse in November 1918, Baden was interned with the majority of the High Seas Fleet in Scapa Flow by the British Royal Navy. On 21 June 1919, Rear Admiral Ludwig von Reuter ordered the scuttling of the fleet. However, British sailors in the harbour managed to board Baden and beach her to prevent her sinking. The ship was refloated, thoroughly examined, and eventually sunk in extensive gunnery testing by the Royal Navy in 1921. The Baden design was actually used as the basis for the later Bismarck and Tirpitz. This latest release from Kagero flows the now familiar format, with a short history of the ship, covering eleven pages, including:- The construction outline General characteristics of the hull Armour Machinery and propulsion Armament Fire control Ships oats and other equipment Complement SMS Baden Commanders Operational history The next fifty seven pages are taken up with the wonderfully rendered 3D drawings that this series has become known for. Although with this release quite a bit of the lower hull is also shown which is a bonus particularly the torpedo tubes, rudder and propellers. The renderings show every part of the ship both in wide angle and close up which show some amazing detail not seen in other publications. The last ten pages contain more 3D renderings that have been produced in real 3D. Kagero have kindly included a pair of 3D glasses to view these pictures and whilst it is a little gimmicky they do work rather well, with the guns and equipment standing out of the page. Conclusion As we’ve come to know what to expect from this series I can’t really say much more, other than if you’re a maritime fan you really should have them all in your reference library. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  3. IJNS Aircraft Carrier Taiho Kagero Super Drawings in 3D Taihō (meaning Great Phoenix), was an aircraft carrier of the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II. Possessing heavy belt armour and featuring an armoured flight deck (a first for any Japanese aircraft carrier), she represented a major departure in Japanese aircraft carrier design and was expected to not only survive multiple bomb, torpedo, or shell hits, but also continue fighting effectively afterwards. Built by Kawasaki at Kobe, she was laid down on 10 July 1941, launched almost two years later on 7 April 1943 and finally commissioned on 7 March 1944. Taihō was formally commissioned on 7 March 1944. Following several weeks of service trials in Japan's Inland Sea, she was deployed to Singapore, arriving there on 5 April. Taihō was then moved to Lingga Roads, a naval anchorage off Sumatra, where she joined veteran carriers Shōkaku and Zuikaku in the First Carrier Division, First Mobile Force. All three carriers engaged in working up new air groups by practicing launch and recovery operations and acting as targets for mock aerial attacks staged from Singapore airfields by their own planes. On 15 April, Vice-Admiral Jisaburo Ozawa officially transferred his flag from Shōkaku to Taihō to take advantage of the carrier's extensive command facilities. Shortly thereafter, the First Mobile Force departed Lingga and arrived on 14 May at Tawi-Tawi off Borneo, where the fleet could directly refuel with unrefined Tarakan Island crude oil and await execution of the planned Kantai Kessen ("decisive battle") known as Operation A-GO. When American carrier strikes against the Marianas indicated an invasion of Saipan was imminent, the Japanese Combined Fleet staff initiated Operation A-GO on 11 June. Taihō and the rest of Ozawa's First Mobile Force departed Tawi-Tawi on 13 June, threading their way through the Philippine Islands and setting course for Saipan to attack American carrier forces operating in the vicinity. On 19 June 1944, Taihō was one of nine Japanese aircraft carriers involved in the Battle of the Philippine Sea. At 07:45 that morning, she was turned into the wind to launch her contribution (16 Zeros, 17 Judy’s and nine Jill’s) to Ozawa's second attack wave. As Taihō's planes circled overhead to form up, American submarine USS Albacore, which had spotted Ozawa's carriers earlier that morning, reached an ideal attack position and fired a spread of six torpedoes at the carrier. One of Taihō's strike pilots, Warrant Officer Sakio Komatsu, saw the torpedo wakes, broke formation and deliberately crashed his aircraft into the path of one torpedo; the weapon detonated short of its target and four of the remaining five missed. The sixth torpedo, however, found its mark and the resulting explosion holed the carrier's hull on the starboard side, just ahead of the island. The impact also fractured the aviation fuel tanks and jammed the forward elevator between the flight deck and upper hangar deck. With the ship down 5 ft (1.5 m) by the bows due to flooding, the forward elevator pit filled with a mixture of seawater, fuel oil and aviation gasoline. Taiho's captain marginally reduced her speed by a knot and a half to slow the ingress of seawater into the hull where the torpedo had struck. As no fires had started, Vice-Admiral Ozawa ordered that the open elevator well be planked over by a flight deck damage control party in order to allow resumption of normal flight operations. By 09:20, using wooden benches and tables from the petty officers' and sailors' mess rooms, this task was completed. Ozawa proceeded to launch two more waves of aircraft. Meanwhile, leaking aviation gasoline accumulating in the forward elevator pit began vaporising and soon permeated the upper and lower hangar decks. The danger this posed to the ship was readily apparent to the damage control crews but, whether through inadequate training, lack of practice (only three months had passed since the ship's commissioning) or general incompetence, their response to it proved fatally ineffectual. Efforts to pump out the damaged elevator well were bungled and no one thought to try to cover the increasingly lethal mixture with foam from the hangar's fire suppression system. Because Taihō's hangars were completely enclosed, mechanical ventilation was the only means of exhausting fouled air and replacing it with fresh. Ventilation duct gates were opened on either side of hangar sections No. 1 and No. 2 and, for a time, the carrier's aft elevator was lowered to try to increase the draught. But even this failed to have any appreciable effect and, in any case, air operations were resumed about noon, requiring the elevator to be periodically raised as aircraft were brought up to the flight deck. In desperation, damage control parties used hammers to smash out the glass in the ship's portholes. Taihō's chief damage control officer eventually ordered the ship's general ventilation system switched to full capacity and, where possible, all doors and hatches opened to try to rid the ship of fumes. Unfortunately, this simply resulted in saturation of areas previously unexposed to the vapours and increased the chances of accidental or spontaneous ignition. About 14:30 that afternoon, 6½ hours after the initial torpedo hit, Taihō was jolted by a severe explosion. A senior staff officer on the bridge saw the flight deck heave up. The sides blew out. Taihō dropped out of formation and began to settle in the water, clearly doomed. Though Admiral Ozawa wanted to go down with the ship, his staff prevailed on him to survive and to transfer his flag to the cruiser Haguro. Taking the Emperor's portrait, Ozawa transferred to Haguro by destroyer. After he left, Taihō was torn by a second thunderous explosion and sank stern first at 16:28, taking 1,650 officers and men out of a complement of 2,150 down with her. The titles in this series from Kagero are being released thick and fast. This is the 39th title in the Super Drawings in 3D, and another superb reference book for modellers. Continuing with the tried and tested format, but due to the short nature of the ships career there are only four pages of information, yet covering items such as:- The Hull Propulsion Armour The Hanger Conning Tower Armament Aircraft Radars In Service These are followed by ninety pages of the beautifully rendered drawings we have come to expect, covering all external areas of the ship, and although rather a plain ship in comparison with some of the other titles in this series there is a lot of detail provided, such as the retracting searchlights and their covers on the flightdeck edges. Something I didn’t know the ship had. Each rendering has brief annotations which give useful insights as to what the areas are and the subtle details included. There are no detailed 3D drawings of the ships equipment or aircraft, which is a bit of a shame, but you can get most of the detail from the main renderings. The drawings of the quarterdeck and the boat hangers are probably the most interesting part of the ship, just a shame that the aircraft hangers themselves haven’t been included in the drawings, probably due to the lack of accurate material available on this design. The centre pages are taken up with two full width views from the starboard bow and aft quarter and with a pair of side views of the island area showing the camouflage she most likely wore when she was sunk. Unlike the previously reviewed book on the HMS Warspite, this edition does include an A1 sheet of line drawings of the ship, with a three view on one side in 1:400 scale and slightly angled views on the reverse which aren’t to any particular scale. The fore and aft views on this side, however, are also to 1:400. Conclusion This book is certainly a lot thicker than the other titles reviewed here and if you have a set of optivisors then the detail contained therein can be put to good use if you’re building either the Tamiya or Fujimi 1:700 kits available. I just hope that Fujimi release an example in my preferred 1:350 scale one day. As with the others in the series, this book could form part of a superb library of 3D drawings that any maritime modeller will be proud of. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  4. HMS Warspite 1914-1919 Kagero Super Drawings in 3D HMS Warspite was a Queen Elizabeth-class battleship built for the Royal Navy during the early 1910s. Other than the Battle of Jutland, and the inconclusive action of 19 August, her service during World War 1 generally consisted of routine patrols and training in the North Sea. Warspite, the sixth warship of the Royal Navy to carry the name, was laid down on 21 October 1912 at Devonport Royal Dockyard, launched on 26 November 1913, and completed in April 1915 under the command of Captain Edward Phillpotts. Warspite joined the 2nd Battle Squadron of the Grand Fleet following a number of acceptance trials, including gunnery trials, which saw Churchill present when she fired her 15 inch (381 mm) guns. Churchill was suitably impressed with their accuracy and power. In late 1915, Warspite was grounded in the River Forth causing some damage to her hull; she had been led by her escorting destroyers down the small ships channel. After undergoing repairs for two months at Rosyth and Jarrow, she rejoined the Grand Fleet, this time as part of the newly formed 5th Battle Squadron which had been created for Queen Elizabeth-class ships. In early December, Warspite was involved in another incident when, during an exercise, she collided with her sister-ship Barham, which caused considerable damage to Warspite's bow. She made it back to Scapa Flow and from there to Devonport for more repair work, rejoining the fleet on Christmas Eve 1915. Having escaped the trap the 5th Battle Squadron headed north, exchanging fire with both Hipper's battlecruiser force and the leading elements of Scheer's battleships, damaging Markgraf. When the squadron turned to join the Grand Fleet the damage from a shell hitting the port-wing engine room caused Warspite's steering to jam as she attempted to avoid her sister-ships Valiant and Malaya. Captain Phillpotts decided to maintain course, in effect circling, rather than come to a halt and reverse. This decision exposed Warspite and made her a tempting target; she was hit 13 times, but inadvertently diverted attention from the armoured cruiser Warrior, which had been critically damaged whilst attacking the leading elements of the German fleet. This action gained her the admiration of Warrior's surviving crew, who believed that Warspite's movement had been intentional. The crew regained control of Warspite after two full circles. Their efforts to end the circular motion placed her on a course which took her towards the German fleet. The rangefinders and the transmission station were non-functional and only "A" turret could fire, albeit under local control with 12 salvos falling short of their target. Sub Lieutenant Herbert Annesley Packer was subsequently promoted for his command of "A" turret. Rather than continue, Warspite was stopped for ten minutes so the crew could make repairs. They succeeded in correcting the problem, but the ship would be plagued with steering irregularities for the rest of her naval career. As the light faded the Grand Fleet crossed ahead of the German battle line and opened fire, forcing the High Seas Fleet to retreat and allowing Warspite to slip away. Warspite was holed 150 times during the battle, and had 14 killed and 16 wounded; among the latter warrant officer Walter Yeo, who became one of the first men to receive facial reconstruction via plastic surgery. Although she had been extensively damaged, Warspite could still raise steam and was ordered back to Rosyth during the evening of 31 May by Rear-Admiral Hugh Evan-Thomas, commander of the 5th Battle Squadron. Whilst travelling across the North Sea the ship came under attack from a German U-boat. The U-boat fired three torpedoes, all of which missed their target. Warspite later attempted to ram a surfaced U-boat. She signalled ahead for escorts and a squadron of torpedo boats came out to meet her. They were too slow to screen her effectively, but there were no more encounters with German vessels and she reached Rosyth safely on the morning of 1 June, where it took two months to repair the damage. Upon the completion of her repairs, Warspite rejoined the 5th Battle Squadron. Further misfortune struck soon afterwards, when she collided with Valiant after a night-shooting exercise, necessitating more repair work at Rosyth. Captain Philpotts avoided reprimand on this occasion, but was moved to a shore-based job as Naval Assistant to the new First Sea Lord, Admiral Jellicoe. He was replaced by Captain de Bartolome in December 1916. In June 1917, Warspite collided with a destroyer, but did not require major repairs. In the following month, Warspite was rocked at her moorings in Scapa Flow when Vanguard, a St. Vincent-class battleship, exploded with the loss of hundreds of her crew when an ammunition magazine detonated. Early in April 1918 she joined the Grand Fleet in a fruitless pursuit of the German High Seas Fleet which had been hunting for a convoy near Norway. In 1918, Warspite had to spend four months being repaired after a boiler room caught fire. Captain Hubert Lynes relieved Captain de Bartolome and on 21 November he took Warspite out to escort the German High Seas Fleet into internment at Scapa Flow following the signing of the Armistice. This is the latest book of Kageros 3D Drawings, and the 38th in the series, which is building up nicely into a superb single point of reference for maritime modellers. Following the now familiar format, but with only four pages of text giving the information on the design of the ship and its operational service; these are followed by seventy three pages of beautifully rendered drawings covering all external areas of the ship, and it is these drawings that set this series above others as the show much more detail than any period photograph can show, or that shown on 2D plans. Each rendering has brief annotations which give useful insights as to what the areas are and the subtle details included. The last nine pages contain drawings of individual items, such as the main turrets, secondary and tertiary armament, ships boats, (ranging from the 50ft steam pinnace right down to the 15ft dinghy), torpedoes, and the various calibres of shells she carried. Unfortunately this title doesn’t come with any line drawings or plans, unlike most of the series. Conclusion This is another great addition to the series and will be very useful if you’re building the Trumpeter 1:700 kit, although it will be just as useful for any other scales. It’ll certainly be a nice addition to any maritime library, especially those with family connections to this great ship as I do. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  5. The Light Cruiser Emden Kagero Super Drawings in 3D SMS Emden was the second and final member of the Dresden class of light cruisers built for the Imperial German Navy (Kaiserliche Marine). Named for the town of Emden, she was laid down at the Kaiserliche Werft (Imperial Dockyard) in Danzig in 1906. Her hull was launched in May 1908, and completed in July 1909. She had one sister ship, Dresden. Like the preceding Königsberg-class cruisers, Emden was armed with ten 10.5 cm (4.1 in) guns and two torpedo tubes. Emden spent the majority of her career overseas in the German East Asia Squadron, based in Tsingtao, in the Kiautschou Bay concession in China. In 1913, she came under the command of Karl von Müller, who would captain the ship during World War I. At the outbreak of hostilities, Emden captured a Russian steamer and converted her into the commerce raider Cormoran. Emden rejoined the East Asia Squadron, after which she was detached for independent raiding in the Indian Ocean. The cruiser spent nearly two months operating in the region, and captured nearly two dozen ships. In late October 1914, Emden launched a surprise attack on Penang; in the resulting Battle of Penang, she sank the Russian cruiser Zhemchug and the French destroyer Mousquet. Müller then took Emden to raid the Cocos Islands, where he landed a contingent of sailors to destroy British facilities. There, Emden was attacked by the Australian cruiser HMAS Sydney. The more powerful Australian ship quickly inflicted serious damage and forced Müller to run his ship aground to prevent her from sinking. Out of a crew of 376, 133 were killed in the battle. Most of the survivors were taken prisoner; the landing party, led by Hellmuth von Mücke, commandeered an old schooner and eventually returned to Germany. Emden 's wreck was quickly destroyed by wave action, and was broken up for scrap in the 1950s For number 37 in their series of Super Drawings in 3D, Kagero have chosen another great subject, the German light cruiser SMS Emden. Normally with these books, the first fifteen or so pages provide much of the design, specifications and history of the ship. Well, not in this case. Whilst there is a potted history of sorts, it only takes up the first four pages and is very brief indeed. The next fifty three pages are filled with beautifully rendered 3D drawings covering every part of the ships structure, weapons, boats and sundry equipment. The drawings are really clear and perfect for the maritime modeller to see all the useful details that could help make that masterpiece that we all strive for. Being in full colour also helps with the painting. Unlike the rest of the series, this book does not come with the large full colour pullouts that complimented the previous releases. Instead you can order them, now rolled rather than folded, from the Kagero website. Apparently the folded ones weren’t easy to frame? This book also doesn’t include any plans, which is a great shame as they are really useful to the maritime modeller. The final sixteen pages contain the weird looking 3D pictures, for which you will need the red and blue glasses that Kagero provide. Conclusion Following the now tried and tested formula that Kagero have made their own this book is superbly produced. If you have a kit of the Emden in your possession then you really need this book to make the very best of it. Just a shame they haven’t included at least the plans as they are most helpful to the modeller. Highly recommended Review sample courtesy of
  6. HIJNS Yahagi Kagero Super Drawings in 3D The four Agano-class cruisers light cruisers operated by the Imperial Japanese Navy. All were named after Japanese rivers. Larger than previous Japanese light cruisers, the Agano-class vessels were fast, but with little protection, and were under-gunned for their size. They participated in numerous actions during World War II. The Agano class was followed by the larger Ōyodo-class cruiser, of which only a single vessel was completed. The Imperial Japanese Navy had developed a standardized design for light cruisers as flagships for destroyer and submarine squadrons, based on a 5,500 ton displacement, shortly after World War I. However, by the 1930s these vessels were obsolete, as contemporary destroyers were faster, carried more powerful armament, and had greater endurance. As soon as the restrictions of the London Naval Treaty were removed, the Navy General Staff developed a plan within the Fourth Fleet Supplemental Budget to build 13 new 6000 ton cruisers between 1939 and 1945 to replace the Tenryū, Kuma, and Nagara-class cruisers. These vessels were intended to be the flagships for six destroyer squadrons and seven submarine squadrons. The new design was finalized in October 1937; however, construction was delayed due to overloading of the Japanese shipyards. Construction costs came to 16.4 million yen per vessel. The design for the Agano class was based on technologies developed by aboard the cruiser Yūbari, resulting in a graceful and uncluttered deck line and single smokestack. Unlike most Japanese designs, the Agano class was not overweight, so it exhibited good stability and seaworthiness. The Agano class was armed with six 152 mm Type 41 guns in three gun turrets. These guns were also used on the Kongō-class battlecruisers, some of these weapons having been removed from the Fusō-class battleships and the Kongō class during their modernizations in the early and late 1930s, respectively. This gun fired a 100 lb (45 kg) projectile 22,970 yards (21,000 m). The Agano class was unique among Japanese cruisers in that its main armament could elevate to 55 degrees, but this was still not enough to make them effective as anti-aircraft weapons. Secondary armament included four 76 mm Type 98 DP guns designed specifically for the class, in two twin turrets amidships. Anti-aircraft weapons included two triple 25 mm AA guns in front of the bridge, and two twin 13 mm mounts near the mast. The class also had two quadruple torpedo launchers for Type 93 torpedoes located below the flight deck, with eight reserve torpedoes. The torpedo tubes were mounted on the centerline, as was more common with destroyers, and had a rapid reload system with eight spare torpedoes. Being mounted on the centerline allowed the twin launchers to fire to either port or starboard, meaning that a full eight-torpedo broadside could be fired, whereas a ship with separate port and starboard launchers can only fire half of its torpedoes at a time. Two depth charge rails and 18 depth charges were also installed aft. The class was also equipped with two Aichi E13A aircraft. The first two vessels in the class (Agano and Noshiro) had a larger flight deck with a 26-foot catapult. The later Yahagi and Sakawa had a shorter 19-meter catapult. The engines were a quadruple-shaft geared turbine arrangement with six boilers in five boiler rooms, developing 100,000 shp (75,000 kW) for a maximum speed of 35 knots (65 km/h). Like Yūbari, the Agano class had its stacks join into a single funnel. All of the vessels in the class were updated with additional anti-aircraft weaponry and radar at various points in their service lives. Commissioned on 29 December 1943 Yahagi, the subject of this book, saw action in the Marianas in May/June 1944, during the Battle of the Philippine Sea, and during the Battle of Leyte Gulf. After the US invasion of Okinawa on 1 April 1945, she was ordered to accompany the battleship Yamato on its suicide mission against the American fleet at Okinawa. Yahagi was hit by some seven torpedoes as well as a dozen bombs, and sank on the afternoon of 7 April 1945. This latest book of Kageros 3D Drawings is actually the 36th in the series, which is building up nicely into a superb single point of reference for maritime modellers. Following the now familiar format the first eight pages contain text describing the design of the ship and its operational service; these are followed by sixty three pages of beautifully rendered drawings covering all external areas of the ship, a lot of which shows up details that you couldnt get from period photographs of plans. Each rendering has brief annotations which give useful insights as to what the areas are and the subtle details included. The last eighteen pages show similar detail, but are printed in such a way that you need to used the red and blue 3D glasses provided, otherwise they make you eyes go a bit weird. Whilst this is a bit of a gimmick it does work and gives the reader a sense of proportion and depth of the ship. A while ago Kagero stated that they werent going to include plans with these books and were going to sell them rolled up so that buyers could mount them in frames. So, it was a bit of a surprise to find that they have included a double sided A1 sheet of plans. One side contains five views of the ship in 1:350 scale, along with a couple of scrap views of the funnel area. On the opposite side plans of the superstructure, aircraft handling deck and main mast, some in 1:350 and some in no particular scale. Conclusion This is another great addition to the series and will be very useful if youre building the superb Hasegawa 1:350 kit, although it will be just as useful for any other scales. The 3D pictures at the back of the book are a bit of fun and its surprising how well they work even with the cheap cardboard glasses included. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  7. SMS Viribus Unitis Kagero Super Drawings in 3D In 1907 the navy of the dualist, multinational Austro-Hungarian Empire placed an order for a new class of warships, whose design was based on the “all big gun” concept pioneered by HMS Dreadnought. Eventually four Tegetthoff class vessels were laid down, including the flagship Viribus Unitis, Tegetthoff, Prinz Eugen and Szent Istvan. The last warship of the class was not completed until well into World War I. The vessels’ careers were not especially eventful. They spent most of their service lives as a “fleet in being” anchored in a well-protected port of Pola with only occasional trips to the Fažana Channel (well-screened by Brijuni Islands) for gunnery practice. During the war the ships were manned mainly by reservists, while the most promising and experienced members of their crews were detached to serve onboard submarines or torpedo boats, or assigned to land-based units. The second ship of the class ended her career in rather dramatic circumstances, which is why she perhaps deserves a more detailed treatment. Launched in late June 1911, Viribus Unitis had an overall length of 152 metres (498 ft 8 in), a beam of 27.9 metres (91 ft 6 in), and a draught of 8.7 metres (28 ft 7 in) at deep load. She displaced 20,000 tonnes (19,684 long tons) at load and 21,689 tonnes (21,346 long tons) at deep load. She had four Parsons steam turbines, each of which was housed in a separate engine-room. The turbines were powered by twelve Babcock & Wilcox boilers. The turbines were designed to produce a total of 27,000 shaft horsepower (20,134 kW), which was theoretically enough to attain her designed speed of 20 knots (23 mph; 37 km/h), but no figures from her speed trials are known to exist. She carried 1,844.5 tonnes (1,815.4 long tons) of coal, and an additional 267.2 tonnes (263.0 long tons) of fuel oil that was to be sprayed on the coal to increase its burn rate. At full capacity, she could steam for 4,200 nautical miles (7,800 km) at a speed of 10 knots (12 mph; 19 km/h). When completed the ship mounted twelve 305-millimetre (12 in)/45-calibre K 10 guns in four triple turrets. Her secondary armament consisted of twelve 15-centimetre (5.91 in)/50 K 10 guns mounted in casemates amidships. Twelve 66-millimetre (3 in)/50 K 10 guns were mounted on open pivots on the upper deck above the casemates. Three more 66-mm K 10 guns were mounted on the upper turrets for anti-aircraft duties. Four 21-inch (530 mm) submerged torpedo tubes were fitted, one each in the bow, stern and on each broadside; twelve torpedoes were carried. With their series of books in the 3D format, Kagero never fails to deliver. This particular publication on the Austro Hungarian battleship not only provides a superb history of the ship, one which I knew very little, if anything about before reviewing this book. Since there really isn’t much in the way of history to this ship therefore it only takes the first five pages to cover it and includes the following:- Design Naming of the ship The Only Overseas Cruise Archduke Ferdinand’s Final Voyage Helping the Goeben Bombardment of Italy’s East Coast The Empire of Many Governments First Signs of Collapse at Pola Viribus Unitis Under the Red Ensign The Navy of the National Council Assault of the Flagship The Remains The rest of the fifty nine pages are filled with beautifully rendered 3D drawings covering every part of the ships structure, weapons, boats and sundry equipment. The drawings are really clear and perfect for the maritime modeller to see all the useful details that could help make that masterpiece that we all strive for. Kagero have recently made the decision not to include the full colour pullouts and plans that the rest of the series had. Instead you can order them, now rolled rather than folded, can be ordered from the Kagero website. Apparently the folded ones weren’t easy to frame? Whilst this is a shame, they have included several overall A4 views of the ship and the centrefold covers the full A3 size, showing the ship anchored at sea, which is beautiful rendition, in fact it’s one of the best I’ve seen. The last ten pages of the 3D renderings, give closer details for the turrets, ships boats, boat cradles, ships cranes, the bridge structure and rather unusually the propellers. The most useful sections are those drawings that show how the anti-torpedo nets were hung from the poles along the sides of the ship, as these would have been similar throughout the worlds fleets from that period. Conclusion Following the now tried and tested formula that Kagero have made their own, this book is superbly produced and with the unusual subject matter will become a must have for any maritime modeller or historian. With only the Combrig kits available, it may have a lesser role in the modelling field, but with the later release of a Top Drawings title, also from Kagero, it may come in handy for a scratch builder. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  8. DKM Pocket Battleship Lutzow Kagero Super Drawings in 3D Deutschland was the lead ship of her class of heavy cruisers (often termed a pocket battleship) which served with the Kriegsmarine of Nazi Germany during World War II. Ordered by the Weimar government for the Reichsmarine, she was laid down at the Deutsche Werke shipyard in Kiel in February 1929 and completed by April 1933. Originally classified as an armoured ship, (Panzerschiff), by the Reichsmarine, in February 1940 the Germans reclassified the remaining two ships of this class as heavy cruisers. In 1940, she was renamed Lützow, after the Admiral Hipper-class heavy cruiser Lützow was handed over to the Soviet Union. The ship saw significant action with the Kriegsmarine, including several non-intervention patrols in the Spanish Civil War, during which she was attacked by Republican bombers. At the outbreak of World War II, she was cruising the North Atlantic, prepared to attack Allied merchant traffic. Bad weather hampered her efforts, and she only sank or captured a handful of vessels before returning to Germany. She then participated in Operation Weserübung, the invasion of Norway. Damaged at the Battle of Drøbak Sound, she was recalled to Germany for repairs. While en route, she was torpedoed and seriously damaged by a British submarine. Repairs were completed by March 1941, Lützow returned to Norway to join the forces arrayed against Allied shipping to the Soviet Union. She ran aground during a planned attack on convoy PQ 17, which necessitated another return to Germany for repairs. She next saw action at the Battle of the Barents Sea with the heavy cruiser Admiral Hipper, which ended with a failure to destroy the convoy JW 51B. Engine problems forced a series of repairs culminating in a complete overhaul at the end of 1943, after which the ship remained in the Baltic. Sunk in shallow waters in the Kaiserfahrt in April 1945 by Royal Air Force (RAF) bombers, Lützow was used as a gun battery to support German troops fighting the Soviet Army until 4 May 1945, when she was disabled by her crew. Raised by the Soviet Navy in 1947, she was subsequently sunk as a target in the Baltic. Yet another release from Kagero in their Super Drawings in 3D series of softback books, this one concentrating on the Pocket Battleship Deutschland/Lutzow. Totalling eighty Five pages the first thirteen pages are taken up with the ships history and covers:- The construction outline Early Service and the Spanish Civil War Wartime Operations Combat activity from Norwegian Bases Final demise The next fifty nine pages are taken up with the wonderfully rendered 3D drawings that this series has become known for. Although with this release quite a bit of the lower hull is also shown which is a bonus particularly the rudder and propellers. The renderings show every part of the ship both in wide angle and close up which show some amazing detail not seen in other publications. The last thirteen pages contain more 3D renderings that have been produced in real 3D. Kagero have kindly included a pair of 3D glasses to view these pictures and whilst it is a little gimmicky they do work rather well, the guns and equipment standing out of the page. This title also comes with two A1 fold out double sided sheets. The first has drawings of the ship and certain parts of the superstructure, all in 1:200 scale, which hopefully will be a portent of things to come from, say, Trumpeter. The second has plans of the ship as she was in 1942 and drawn in 1:350 scale, along with numerous detail drawings of armament and equipment ins 1:50 and 1:100 scales, all very useful to the modeller who may like to convert the Academy Graff Spee into the Lutzow. Conclusion As we’ve come to know what to expect from this series I can’t really say much more, other than if you’re a maritime fan you really should have them all in your reference library. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  9. DKM Heavy Cruiser Admiral Hipper Kagero Super Drawings in 3D Admiral Hipper, the first of five ships of her class, was the lead ship of the Admiral Hipper class of heavy cruisers which served with Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine during World War II. The ship was laid down at the Blohm & Voss shipyard in Hamburg in July 1935 and launched February 1937; and entered service shortly before the outbreak of war, in April 1939. The ship was named after Admiral Franz von Hipper, commander of the German battlecruiser squadron during the Battle of Jutland in 1916 and later commander-in-chief of the German High Seas Fleet. Admiral Hipper saw a significant amount of action during the war. She led the assault on Trondheim during Operation Weserübung; while en route to her objective, she sank the British destroyer HMS Gloworm. In December 1940, she broke out into the Atlantic Ocean to operate against Allied merchant shipping, though this operation ended without significant success. In February 1941, Admiral Hipper sortied again, sinking several merchant vessels before eventually returning to Germany via the Denmark Strait. The ship was then transferred to northern Norway to participate in operations against convoys to the Soviet Union, culminating in the Battle of the Barents Sea on 31 December 1942, where she sank the destroyer Achates and the Minesweeper Bramble but was in turn damaged and forced to withdraw by the light cruisers HMS Sheffield and HMS Jamaica. Disappointed by the failure to sink merchant ships in that battle, Adolf Hitler ordered the majority of the surface warships scrapped, though Admiral Karl Dönitz was able to convince Hitler to retain the surface fleet. As a result, Admiral Hipper was returned to Germany and decommissioned for repairs. The ship was never restored to operational status, however, and on 3 May 1945, Royal Air Force bombers severely damaged her while she was in Kiel. Her crew scuttled the ship at her moorings, and in July 1945, she was raised and towed to Heikendorfer Bay. She was ultimately broken up for scrap in 1948–1952; her bell resides in the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich. This softback book, in their Super Drawings in 3D series is another brilliant addition to this ever increasing range. The 3D renderings are as beautiful as ever and show the ship as she was in December 1942. As usual you get a full tour of the ship showing the tiniest detail in a format that can really help the modeller, especially as there are areas or points of view that you just wouldn’t get in photographs. The whole ship above the waterline is covered with just a cursory glance at the propellers. Perhaps the only area they could improve these books is with the inclusion of some of the underwater fittings and fixtures. The first eight pages contain the text which covers her design, development, powerplant, armament, anti-aircraft armament upgrades and her war history. The rest of the seventy seven pages are filled with the 3D renderings. In addition Kagero have also included an A1 double side sheet of plans, with one side contain full side, top down, bow and stern views in 1:350. The other side contains a ¾ view off the bow in what looks like 1:200 scale along with some large scale drawings of the ships foreward turrets Anton and Bruno, along with three styles of ships boats. Conclusion The clarity of each rendering is what makes this series of books a must have for anyone interested in maritime history in general or these ships in particular. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  10. Russian Protected Cruiser Kagero Super Drawings in 3D The Imperial Admiralty contracted William Cramp and Sons of Philadelphia to build the ship, and her keel was laid in October 1898. Launched on 31 October 1899, under Captain Vladimir Behr, she was commissioned into the Imperial Russian Navy on 2 January 1901. During the Battle of Chemulpo Bay at the start of the Russo-Japanese War, Varyag (under the command of Captain of the First Rank Vsevolod Rudnev) accepted a badly unequal battle with the Japanese squadron of Admiral Uriu (one armoured cruiser, five protected cruisers and eight destroyers) in a heroic attempt to break out from Chemulpo (Inchon) harbour 9 February 1904. Chemulpo was in neutral Korean waters. Admiral Uriu gave the Russian ships in harbour a written ultimatum to sail by 12:00 noon or be attacked in the harbour itself. Captain Rudnev sortied, accompanied by the gunboat Koreets; having lost 31 men dead, 191 injured (out of 570) and outgunned, both ships returned to harbour by 1:00 p.m., the crew decided not to surrender, but to sink the ship. The crew was saved by transferring them to the British cruiser Talbot, the French cruiser Pascal, and the Italian cruiser Elba; the captain of the American cruiser Vicksburg declined doing so as a violation of U.S. neutrality. In 1907, Vsevolod Rudnev (by that time dismissed from Russian naval service in the rank of rear admiral) was decorated with the Japanese Order of the Rising Sun for his heroism in that battle; although he accepted the order, he never wore it in public. Varyag was later salvaged by the Japanese and repaired. She served with the Imperial Japanese Navy as light cruiser Soya. During World War I, Russia and Japan were allies and several ships were transferred by the Japanese to the Russians. She was returned to the Imperial Russian Navy at Vladivostok on 5 April 1916 and renamed Varyag. In June, she departed for Murmansk via the Indian Ocean, arriving in November 1916. She was sent to Liverpool in Great Britain for an overhaul by Cammell Laird in February 1917, and was due to re-enter service with the Arctic squadron of the Russian Navy. However, following the Russian October Revolution on 7 November 1917 crewmen who had remained onboard hoisted the red flag and refused to set sail. On 8 December 1917 she was seized by a detachment of British soldiers. Assigned to the Royal Navy in February 1918, she ran aground while under tow off of Ireland, but was refloated and used as a hulk until 1919. She was then sold to a German firm in 1920 for scrap, but ran aground on rocks off the Scottish coast in the Firth of Clyde, while being towed to Germany. She was scrapped in place from 1923-1925. With their series of books in the 3D format Kagero never fails to deliver. This particular publication on the Russian protected cruiser Varyag not onlyprovides a superb history of the ship over the first 15 pages covering the following:- Design Naming of the ship Construction and Commissioning Hull Structure Armament Machinery Additional equipment Beginning of service Battle of Chempulo Bay Further fate of the ship The rest of the thirty nine pages are filled with beautifully rendered 3D drawings covering every part of the ships structure, weapons, boats and sundry equipment. The drawings are really clear and perfect for the maritime modeller to see all the useful details that could help make that masterpiece that we all strive for. Being in full colour also helps with the painting, but they only show the ship as she was when she wore the white and buff uppers and green anti-fouling, whereas at some point in her career she also wore red anti-fouling dark grey upper works; although they do show this scheme in four pictures at the end of the book. Unlike the rest of the series, this book does not come with the large full colour pullouts that complimented the previous releases. Instead you can order them, now rolled rather than folded, can be ordered from the Kagero website. Apparently the folded ones weren’t easy to frame? What you do get though is a nice set of plans on an A3 sheet, with 1:350 scale on one side and 1:700 scale on the other along with 1:100 scale diagrams on the armament and 1:200 scale of the ships boats. There is also an A3 poster with the full colour profiles of the ship in both of its main colour schemes. Conclusion Following the now tried and tested formula that Kagero have made their own this book is superbly produced. If you have a kit of the Varyag in your possession then you really need this book to make the very best of it. The plans and diagrams will be most helpful in the sort of areas the modeller rarely sees. Very highly recommended Review sample courtesy of
  11. KP-Kovozavody Prostejov/new gliders SG-38 gondola

    Friends, KP -Kovozávody Prostejov now puts on sale the next version of the beautiful glider SG-38th This time versions are gondolou.Model is fully processed 3D modeling and CAD-CAM technology into metal molds. Search on sale at all good retailers. Info and insights on: http://www.kovozavody.cz/ http://modelweb.modelforum.cz/2015/03/19/novinky-kovozavody-prostejov-9/#more-96715 Very best regards
  12. Hi, before I start I have no affiliation with this company what so ever. I just thought that any builders of 1/700 US or RN warships should take a look at this site. http://www.3dmodelparts.com/ship-accessories/?sort=featured&page=2 I received my order of octuple pom pom's today and am totally amazed at the quality of the parts. These are 3D printed in acrylic resin and are very fine, they are much easier than photo-etch and have 3D barrels. They can also be set at any elevation, so are ideal for diorama's. I hope that some one finds a use for these as I think they are amazing. There are several different weapons and a few structure parts available. Mick ps, I have been chatting to the owner and he is asking for suggestions on his new items.
  13. HIJNS Kaga Kagero Super Drawings in 3D Kaga (Japanese: 加賀) was an aircraft carrier of the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN), named after the former Kaga Province in present-day Ishikawa Prefecture. Originally intended to be one of two Tosa-class battleships, Kaga was converted under the terms of the Washington Naval Treaty to an aircraft carrier as the replacement for the battlecruiser Amagi, which had been damaged in an earthquake. Kaga was rebuilt in 1933–35, increasing her top speed, improving her exhaust systems, and adapting her flight decks to more modern, heavier aircraft. The third Japanese aircraft carrier to enter service, Kaga featured prominently in the development of the IJN's carrier striking force doctrine. The doctrine, which grouped carriers together to give greater mass and concentration to their air power, was a revolutionary strategic concept at the time. The employment of this doctrine was crucial in enabling Japan to attain its initial strategic goals during the first six months of the Pacific War. Kaga's aircraft first supported Japanese troops in China during the Shanghai Incident of 1932 and participated in the Second Sino-Japanese War in the late 1930s. With other carriers, she took part in the Pearl Harbor raid in December 1941 and the invasion of Rabaul in the Southwest Pacific in January 1942. The following month her aircraft participated in a combined carrier airstrike on Darwin, Australia, helping secure the conquest of the Dutch East Indies by Japanese forces. She missed the Indian Ocean raid in April as she had to return to Japan for permanent repairs after hitting a rock in February. After repairs Kaga rejoined the 1st Air Fleet for the Battle of Midway in June 1942. After bombarding American forces on Midway Atoll, Kaga and the other carriers were attacked by American aircraft from the carriers Enterprise, Hornet, and Yorktown. Dive bombers from Enterprise severely damaged Kaga; when it became obvious she could not be saved, she was scuttled by Japanese destroyers to prevent her from falling into enemy hands. The loss of Kaga and three other IJN carriers at Midway was a crucial strategic defeat for Japan and contributed significantly to Japan's ultimate defeat in the war. In 1999, debris from Kaga was located on the ocean floor; the main body of the carrier has not yet been found. The is the latest book is in Kageros 3D series and as with the others the first few pages, six in this case, are dedicated to the history of design, construction, The beginnings of the service and reconstruction, The War in the Pacific and the Last Battle. The next seventy pages are filled with the usual amazing renderings in 3D which cover every external part of the ship. The superb drawings will certainly aid the modeller, particularly with the areas not normally seen in photographs, such as the complex trusses and beams on the underside of the flightdeck fore and aft. Each drawing has small annotations which give useful insights as to what the areas are and the subtle details included. Kagero have also included a pull out double sided sheet, with line drawings of various ships equipment in various scales from 1:50 to 1:200 on one side and side, front and rear views in 1:400 scale on the reverse, with full details of the rigging on the strangely canted masts on the starboard side, which although they can be hoisted upright, most of the pictures show them slanted outboard. Conclusion This series of books is becoming a must have resource for both the historian and modeller alike, but perhaps of more interest to the maritime modeller as they provide so many pictures of the intimate details of the ships. The drawings are so clear it should be relatively easy to transfer what’s in the book to a model. At the moment I believe the only kits of the Kaga are in 1:700, but Fujimi are to rectify this with the release of one in 1:350 later this year. Very highly recommended Review sample courtesy of
  14. Has anyone come across a 3D pantograph tool that allows fine detailed work to be undertaken? The idea is that while your hand moves so far the end of the mechanism only travels a quarter of that distance. This might aid fine detail painting or placing of parts, and reduce the effect of any hand tremor. There is a commercial offering. In fact it's the only one I've come across in recent years. It's a Singer Mk1 Micromanipulator. It's aimed at institutions and laboratories that work with microscopes. It's used by the biotech and microelectronic industries mostly. This one seems to be very well designed and built, indeed it is a precision instrument meant for professional use. http://www.singerinstruments.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=20&Itemid=516 ................It costs £4,500. (2015 prices). At the moment, I'm imagining prototypes made from loosely bolted lengths of Meccano. Do you know of such a tool?
  15. USS Massachusetts Kagero Super Drawings in 3D USS Massachusetts, a 35,000 ton South Dakota class battleship built at Quincy, Massachusetts, was commissioned in May 1942. Following shakedown and training operations, she took part in the Invasion of North Africa, engaging French warships at and off Casablanca, Morocco, on 8 November 1942. Massachusetts transferred to the Pacific in early 1943. Following several months in the South Pacific, she participated in the invasions of the Gilberts and Marshalls in late 1943 and early 1944, raids on Japanese-held islands in February to May and the Hollandia invasion in April 1944. The Massachusetts was overhauled in mid-1944, then returned to the Pacific war zone to take part in raids on Okinawa and Formosa in October, the Battle of Leyte Gulf later in that month and attacks in the Philippines area during the rest of that year. Her operations with the fast carrier striking forces continued in 1945 with further attacks in support of the invasion of Luzon in January, Iwo Jima in February and Okinawa in March-June. During July and August 1945, Massachusetts twice bombarded the Japanese home islands with her sixteen-inch guns. Following a late 1945 overhaul, Massachusetts was stationed along the U.S. Pacific coast until April 1946, when she returned to the Atlantic. The battleship decommissioned in March 1947 and remained in the Reserve Fleet until stricken from the Naval Vessel Register in June 1962. Three years later, USS Massachusetts began a second career as a memorial and museum ship at Fall River, Massachusetts, and remains in that role to the present day. The book is in the form of Kageros' 3D format with the first seven pages dedicated to the history of design, construction, The Battle of Casablanca, her Service in the Pacific and the Post War Years. The rest of the book is filled with highly detailed 3D renderings of every part of the main decks and superstructure. All the drawings are supremely well done and will be an absolute goldmine of information for the locations of the many different bits of smaller equipment not normally shown in side drawings or plans, such as 5” practice loaders which are almost hidden from view between the 5” amidships turrets. Included with the book is a pull out double sided sheet, with line drawings of various ships equipment in various scales from 1:50 to 1:200 on one side and side, front and rear views in1:350 scale on the reverse, which is very helpful, particularly with the rigging of the ship.. Conclusion As we have seen with other titles in this series this is a brilliantly laid out book with superbly drawn and rendered pictures plus a good potted history of this fabulous looking ship. I can highly recommend this book to all interested in the “Big Mammie” as she became to be known. Whilst more useful if you have the Trumpeter 1:350 kit for direct comparisons, this book can still help with adding those extra details onto the their 1:700 release. Very highly recommended Review sample courtesy of
  16. Merry Christmas, everyone! I was just looking around the web for possible candidates to fill in the GA parking stands on my prospective airfield apron. The A320s and 737s were catered for, but what about some Cessna & Co. in 1/144?... I came across a couple of online shops offering 3D-printing services which already have a good portion of aircraft, vehicles and airfield equipment in their portfolio: http://www.shapeways.com/search?q=1%2F144&s=0#more-products There are many items ranging from helicopters to WWI fighters, from Etendards to AMXs, from Tucanos to Lynxes, from firetrucks to access steps/ ladders and dinosaurs (it takes a bit to go through the couple of thousands of lines) and I am not commenting on the prices, but should you "require" a certain subject - like me with the Citation Excel and, say, some Skyhawk - then it might be worth a look. *** The other shop is click2detail: https://www.click2detail.com/store/c27/1%3A144.html Here, the product range might be a bit smaller in 1/144, but very much worth a look given the aircraft subjects aaaaaaaaand ... ...the 1/72 Global Express and 1/72 Sentinel R.1 [incl. markings by DRAW Decal] kits Apologies if this has been posted before. I did a quick search upfront but found nothing
  17. Avro Shackleton

    I´ve started to model an Avro Shackleton engine in 3D and I´m blogging about it at IPMS-Stockholm If you have any knowledge about the original, don't hesitate to point out any misunderstandings or if you want to follow a 3D project from start to printed model you are welcome!
  18. HMS Dreadnought Kagero Super Drawings in 3D HMS Dreadnought was a battleship of the Royal Navy that revolutionised naval power. Her entry into service in 1906 represented such a marked advance in naval technology that her name came to be associated with an entire generation of battleships, the "dreadnoughts", as well as the class of ships named after her, while the generation of ships she made obsolete became known as "pre-dreadnoughts". She was the sixth ship of that name in the Royal Navy. Admiral Sir John "Jacky" Fisher, First Sea Lord of the Board of Admiralty, is credited as the father of the Dreadnought. Shortly after he assumed office he ordered design studies for a battleship armed solely with 12-inch guns and a speed of 21 knots. He convened a "Committee on Designs" to evaluate the alternative designs and to assist in the detailed design process. One ancillary benefit of the Committee was that it would shield him, and the Admiralty, from political charges that they had not consulted leading experts before designing such a radically different battleship. Dreadnought was the first battleship of her era to have a uniform main battery, rather than having a few large guns complemented by a heavy secondary battery of somewhat smaller guns. She was also the first capital ship to be powered by steam turbines, making her the fastest battleship in the world at the time of her completion. Her launch helped spark a major naval arms race as navies around the world, particularly the German Imperial Navy rushed to match her in the build-up to World War I. From 1907–1911, Dreadnought served as flagship of the Royal Navy's Home Fleet. In 1910, she attracted the attention of notorious hoaxer Horace de Vere Cole, who persuaded the Royal Navy to arrange for a party of Abyssinian royals to be given a tour of a ship. In reality, the "Abyssinian royals" were some of Cole's friends in blackface and disguise, including a young Virginia Woolf and her Bloomsbury Group friends; it became known as the Dreadnought hoax. Cole had picked Dreadnought because she was at that time the most prominent and visible symbol of Britain's naval might. She was replaced as flagship of the Home Fleet by HMS Neptune in March 1911 and was assigned to the 1st Division of the Home Fleet. She participated in King George V's Coronation Fleet Review in June 1911. Dreadnought became flagship of the 4th Battle Squadron in December 1912 after her transfer from the 1st Battle Squadron, as the 1st Division had been renamed earlier in the year. Between September and December 1913 she was training in the Mediterranean Sea. At the outbreak of World War I in 1914, she was flagship of the 4th Battle Squadron in the North Sea, based at Scapa Flow. She was relieved as flagship on 10 December by HMS Benbow. Ironically for a vessel designed to engage enemy battleships, her only significant action was the ramming and sinking of German submarine SM U-29, skippered by K/Lt Otto Weddigen (of SM U-9 fame), on 18 March 1915. U-29 had broken the surface immediately ahead of Dreadnought after firing a torpedo at HMS Neptune and Dreadnought cut the submarine in two after a short chase. She almost collided with HMS Temeraire who was also attempting to ram. Dreadnought thus became the only battleship ever to sink a submarine. She was refitting from 18 April to 22 June 1916 and missed the Battle of Jutland on 31 May, the most significant fleet engagement of the war. Dreadnought became flagship of the 3rd Battle Squadron on 9 July, based at Sheerness on the Thames, part of a force of pre-dreadnoughts intended to counter the threat of shore bombardment by German battlecruisers. During this time she fired her AA guns at German aircraft that passed over her headed for London. She returned to the Grand Fleet in March 1918, resuming her role as flagship of the Fourth Battle Squadron, but was paid off in July to begin another refit. Dreadnought was put into reserve at Rosyth in February 1919. Dreadnought was put up for sale on 31 March 1920 and sold for scrap to T.W. Ward & Company on 9 May 1921 for the sum of £44,000. She was broken up at Ward's new premises at Inverkeithing, Scotland, upon arrival on 2 January 1923. This is the third of this series that this reviewer has had to review recently and they still don’t disappoint. This title begins with eight pages of history, design philosophy, building and the career of this great ship. This is followed by fifty eight pages of the fabulous 3D drawings that these books are renowned for. It should be noted that all the drawings are of the ship as she was in 1907, so hopefully there will be another book with Dreadnought in her later modification states. As usual every part of ship is covered in the drawings. They are all very detailed and will be a boon to the modeller, particularly if they are using one of the amazing etched detail sets that are available. At the time, the Dreadnought was equipped with an anti torpedo net system that could be rigged even when at sea, although the speed was heavily restricted. Some of the drawings in the book show the ship with the nets rigged allowing the modeller to see exactly how the booms were spread and the cables that attached them to the ship. If you’re prepared to do a fair bit of rigging then these will be invaluable. Alternatively there are drawings showing how the nets and booms were stowed on what was known as the net shelf. Unlike most of the other books the majority of drawings aren’t annotated, which is a shame as they can be useful in identifying the part of ship and the equipment shown in the drawing. That said though the drawings should be pretty self explanatory to the majority of maritime modellers. To bring a maritime model alive it really needs to have railings and rigging. Both of these items are well represented in this book along with the awning stantions, although the awnings themselves aren’t shown it shouldn’t take too much to work out how they are fitted. The rigging in the diagrams are particularly useful, especially showing where and how the various halliards, standing rigging and aerials are attached and how the aerial spreaders are spaced. Also included is a double sided A2 sheet with five view plans, (Port, Starboard, Above, Bow and Stern), in both 1:350 and 1:700 scale on one side. On the other side there are more detailed plans of the main gun turrets, 12 pdr mounts, all the ships boats, (32ft Cutter, 45ft Steam Pinnace, 42ft launch, 40ft Admirals Barge, 27ft Whaler, 23ft Gig and 16ft Dinghy), all in 1:100 scale except for the 12pdr plans which are in 1:50. Also on this side is a drawing of the starboard side of the ship but with a slightly higher viewing angle, which not only gives a better plan view of the rigging but also of the rigged anti-torpedo nets. Conclusion This is another superb book in the series. Doing a few of these in a row does make it difficult to express how good these books are in different ways, but they really are superb. The drawings are so clear and so detailed it’s like you took a photo on the ship itself and the detailed plans on the pull out sheet would look great hung on the wall in front of your modelling desk as you build. If you’re a maritime modeller and you want to build a 1907 HMS Dreadnought then you must get this book and some detail sets to really go to town on and make yourself a museum quality model. Review sample courtesy of
  19. IJN Destroyer Akizuki Kagero Super Drawings in 3D The Akizuki-class destroyers were one of the primary classes of new destroyers of the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) after 1942. The IJN called them Type-B Destroyer from their plan name. They were designed to fight larger ships, aircraft and submarines. Akizuki was the lead ship of her class of destroyers in the Imperial Japanese Navy and considered by many to be among the best Japanese warships of that type in service during World War II. These long range vessels were fast, heavily armed and featured surprisingly good electronics, (at least for the Japanese standards of the time). Add to that the graceful lines and the result is one of the most capable heavy destroyers in service with the IJN. Through experience in the design and construction of destroyers over the years, a huge amount of time and effort, not to mention money were invested in this class of warship to offset the US Navy’s advantage in that field. The initial plans called for the construction of a large number of light anti-aircraft cruisers and destroyers, but this proved too ambitious and prohibitively expensive. Instead the Japanese decided to concentrate on the design of a large destroyer carrying the newest 100mm guns, but no torpedo launchers. This was a new trend in Japanese design philosophy, which until then had favoured destroyers with a heavy offensive armament. The new design was altered to include one quadruple torpedo launcher and became known as the type B destroyer. These series of books from Kagero continue to impress, not only with their superb 3D drawings, but also the well researched history of the ships in question. This title is no different with a comprehensive history of the philosophy behind the design, along with the design itself and the ships operation history making very interesting reading. The Akizuki was an unknown quantity to this reviewer so the six pages covering this have proved very enlightening. The rest of the book is superbly laid out with every part of ship shown in amazing detail with only one or two drawings per page. In addition there are close ups of items such the main turrets, light AA weapons, some beautifully detail drawings of the ships boats, torpedo launcher and the operation of the reload system, and most importantly for a ship modeller the rigging. On the centre pages there is a three view picture of the ship overall so that the reader can see where the other drawings fit in relation to the ship. The diagrams showing the railings and the awning stantions are also very useful too. Each individual drawing is annotated so that the reader knows what they are looking at. Mariusz Motyka, who does all the 3D visualisations and illustrations, really should be commended for his amazing work. In addition to the 3D drawings, Kagero have also included to sheets of double sided A2 plans. One sheet has a three view of the ship overall whilst on the other side the various parts of the ship have been drawn, all in 1:200 scale. The other sheet also has parts such as the superstructure drawing in 1:200 along with 1:50 scale views of the turrets, torpedo launcher and the 25mm AA guns. Conclusion It is getting increasingly difficult to extol the virtues of these books in mere words, you really have see them to believe the amount of detail that is contained on the pages and the very useful separate plans. I believe there is only one model of the Akizuki available and that is the Nichimo 1:200 scale kit. So if you’re lucky enough to have one or are able to get hold of one, then this book will be invaluable.
  20. Type II U-Boat Kagero Super Drawings in 3D First launched in June 1935, the Type II were the first U-boats commissioned in German yards after the repudiation of the Versailles Treaty. Unknown to other nations at that time, Germany had already begun construction for 12 new Type II U-boats as early as 1934. It was not until the signing of the Anglo-German Naval Agreement in February 1935 that construction began to be undertaken publicly. By June 15 1935, the first class of the Type II was launched. Small and cramped, the Type IIs were coastal boats intended principally for training, but because of the shortage of available boats, they were later relegated to war duties. With a crew of 25, the boats had limited range and carried enough provisions for three to four weeks, but frequently returned to port after expending their supply of torpedoes. Due to their small size and heavy rolling on the sea, the Type IIs quickly earned the nickname “Dugout Canoes”. Although of limited use in the open ocean, some remarkable successes were accomplished early in the war by U-boat aces such as Otto Kretschmer. The Type II also earned the respect and admiration of the crew due to its high manoeuvrability, rapid diving time and durability. Later in the war, due to the ever increasing need for training new crews, all Type II U-boats were withdrawn from combat duties and assigned to full-time training. A total of 50 Type II U-boats were built during the war. There are four variants, Type IIA, IIB, IIC and IID. Another in the great series of 3D format books from Kagero with only the first two pages dedicated to the history of construction, and mention of the four types of Type II submarines produced. The remaining pages are full of 3D drawings. The drawings and artwork are very clear and would be easy to work from. Each Type II sub-mark, (A to D), is given its own section covering what seems like every external part of the boats, each and every fitting on them. There are also larger close up drawings of items such as the weapons and their differing style of mounting. The rigging and wiring is particularly useful. Also included is a double sided A2 sheet of line drawings in 1:144 scale, making them perfect for using with the Revell/ICM kits and seeing where and how they need to be modified to produce an accurate model. Conclusion This is a superb and very useful book for those of us who have the kits in the stash or are wishing to buy one, knowing that it should be possible to recreate an accurate rendition. The line drawings are the icing on the cake of beautifully rendered 3D offerings.
  21. FN Battleship Richelieu Kagero Super Drawings in 3D The Richelieu was a French battleship, a scaled-up version of the Dunkerque-class battleships and the lead ship of her class. Ordered in 1935, and designed to counter the Italian Littorio-class battleships, Richelieu was the first French 35,000-ton battleship and the first modern battleship built after the 1922 Treaty of Washington. She featured a main armament of eight 380 mm guns in two quadruple turrets in forward super-firing positions. Her armour and underwater protection were equal to her contemporaries, except for the Japanese Yamato-class battleships, but she was limited by a weak anti-aircraft artillery suite and optical-only fire control. In trial runs her speed was a little higher than her European contemporaries, and only surpassed by the U.S. Navy's modern, fast battleships. She left Brest in north-western France for Dakar in French West Africa (modern-day Senegal) in June 1940 to avoid capture in the shipyard where she was nearing completion. She served during World War II, first on the Vichy Regime side, notably fending off a 1940 Allied attempt on Dakar, and then later joined the Allies in 1943. After refitting in New York Navy Yard, she operated with Royal Navy forces in the Indian Ocean in 1944 and 1945. She took part in the return of French forces to Indochina in 1945, and served into the 1960s. Another book in Kageros series of 3D titles, this follows the standard format, with eight pages giving details of the design origins, build and operational history of the ship. This section also gives information about the weapon, electrical and radar systems. The rest of the book is crammed full with 3D diagrams of every part of the ship. Each drawing is accompanied by a well written descriptive text. The colour scheme and indeed the build state in which the ship is depicted throughout the book is that she wore after the refit in the US and her incorporation into the Home Fleet between November 1943 and December 1945. This scheme differs considerably with that shown on the Trumpeter 1:350 kit. In addition to the book there is a pull out double sided A3 sheet with rear quarters, plus fore and aft views on one side, the other side showing port, starboard and overhead views, all in 1:400 scale. Conclusion So, Kagero have done it again with a very useful and well put together book. The diagrams are superb and the text illustrative, just a shame that the pullout diagrams are in 1:400 rather than 1:350. Recommended Review sample courtesy of
  22. DKM Pocket Battleship Graf Spee Kagero Super Drawings in 3D The story of the Graf Spee is a well known one particularly her demise at the end of her stay in Montevideo, with the British squadron waiting for her, she was scuttled instead of going up against what the Germans thought was a much superior force. This book is in the form of Kageros 3D format with the first nine pages dedicated to the history of construction, armour protection, powerplant, individual weapons systems and operational history of this famous ship. The rest of the book is filled with highly detailed 3D renderings of every part of ship, the decks, superstructure, fittings, boats and weapons. All the drawings are supremely well done and will be an absolute goldmine of information for the locations of the many different bits of smaller equipment not normally shown in side drawings or plans, such as all the rigging wires and there attachments. The addition of a pull out double sided sheet, with line drawings of the ships boats, rangefinders, catapult, torpedo tubes, secondary and tertiary weapon, plus numerous smaller items on one side in 1:200 scale, and full three views, plus fore and aft views in 1:350 scale on the reverse is a very useful resource for the modeller. Conclusion This is another great and very useful book from Kagero. It will certainly be really useful to the modeller, although it must be noted that the colour scheme shown in the colour views was only used for a month or two as the ship was re-painted several times in the last six months to her life. Recommended
  23. USS Arizona Kagero Super Drawings in 3D The USS Arizona must rank as one of the most famous battleships of all time, not because of any heroic actions, but remembered due to the manner of her demise on that fateful day, 7th December 1941. This new publication from Kagero is in the same format as the previous titles in the series, some of which have been reviewed here on Britmodeller. The first few pages include the introduction and quite a comprehensive history of the ship plus an interesting analysis of what happened to her at Pearl Harbour, including a couple of theories on how the foreward magazine was penetrated, causing the massive explosion which sank the ship, taking many of her crew with her. The rest of the book is filled with full and half page computer generated renditions of the ship from top to bottom and stem to stern. The details shown will be an absolute boon to any modeller wishing to add as much detail as possible to any of the current kit releases, particularly the big Trumpeter 1:200 where such details have more chance of being seen. The 3D renditions take up the last 18 pages and look quite weird initially, but really do pop out of the page when using the 3D glasses included. This may be a bit of a gimmick, but it really does work gives a good view of how the ship looked in the metal. Another nice inclusion is a set of plans on both sides of an A3 sheet. One side shows close up drawings of the foreward superstructure, main and secondary control stations on the foremast, the funnel and the searchlight batteries and weapon control stations on the main mast. On the reverse are the main plans in 1:350 scale. These show port side, starboards side, top view, bow and stern on views, and are particularly useful as they show the full rigging, which is not always easy to find. Conclusion This isn’t a book for a quick flip and to put it away. I’ve been through it a few times now and am still seeing new details and bits I didn’t see first time round. The forward and history were also very interesting and I learned some information about what may or may not have happened at Pearl. So if you have a kit of the USS Arizona you’d like to build or are just interested in these great ships, then I can highly recommend this book for you. Review sample courtesy of
  24. Its called the 3Doodler.It "writes" on things and fresh air!You can build with it.It uses ABS plastic.A thin rod of ABS is fed through the barrel of the pen and heated to melting point.A cooling fan near the nib dries the ABS instantly.Watch the video on the link below.You can fill gaps, draw thin lines of ABS plastic.It costs $75.Looks like a really useful tool. http://hexus.net/tech/news/peripherals/51861-3doodler-75-3d-pen-hits-kickstarter/
  25. USS Iowa Kagero Super Drawings in 3D USS Iowa (BB-61) was the lead ship of her class of battleship and the fourth in the United States Navy to be named in honor of the 29th state. Owing to the cancellation of the Montana-class battleships, Iowa is the last lead ship of any class of United States battleships, and was the only ship of her class to have served in the Atlantic Ocean during the war. During World War II, she carried President Franklin D. Roosevelt across the Atlantic to Casablanca en route to a crucial 1943 meeting in Tehran with British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet leader Josef Stalin. She has a bathtub — an amenity installed for Roosevelt, along with an elevator to shuttle him between decks.[1] When transferred to the Pacific Fleet in 1944, Iowa shelled beachheads at Kwajalein and Eniwetok in advance of Allied amphibious landings and screened aircraft carriers operating in the Marshall Islands. She also served as the Third Fleet flagship, flying Adm. William F. Halsey's flag at the Japanese surrender in Tokyo Bay. During the Korean War, Iowa was involved in raids on the North Korean coast, after which she was decommissioned into the United States Navy reserve fleets, better known as the "mothball fleet." She was reactivated in 1984 as part of the 600-ship Navy plan, and operated in both the Atlantic and Pacific Fleets to counter the recently expanded Soviet Navy. In April 1989, an explosion of undetermined origin wrecked her #2 gun turret, killing 47 sailors. Iowa was decommissioned for the last time in 1990, and was initially stricken from the Naval Vessel Register in 1995. She was reinstated from 1999 to 2006 to comply with federal laws that required retention and maintenance of two Iowa-class battleships. In 2011 Iowa was donated to the Los Angeles-based non-profit Pacific Battleship Center and was permanently moved to Berth 87 at the Port of Los Angeles in the summer of 2012, where she was opened to the public to serve as a museum and memorial to battleships. This is another of Kageros 3D format books with the first thirteen pages dedicated to the history of construction, modernisations, armour protection, powerplant, individual weapons systems and operational history of this great ship. The rest of the book is filled with highly detailed 3D renderings of every part of the main decks and superstructure. All the drawings are supremely well done and will be an absolute goldmine of information for the locations of the many different bits of smaller equipment not normally shown in side drawings or plans, such as all the rigging wires and their attachments. The addition of a pull out double sided sheet, with line drawings of various ships equipment in various scales from 1:50 to 1:200 on one side and side views in1:400 scale on the reverse is a very nice bonus, and very helpful, particularly with the rigging of the ship. Some descriptions of the ships parts seem incorrect, particularly the aerial farm between the funnels which look more like air vents. This could be a genuine mistake, or just a misprint through translation, but it really doesn't demean the work that's been done with the rest of the book. Conclusion A brilliantly laid out book with superbly drawn and rendered pictures plus a good potted history of this fabulous looking ship. I can highly recommend this book to all interested in the historic Iowa, and could possibly be used for certain construction details of other ships in the class. Review sample courtesy of
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