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Found 200 results

  1. DML Conqueror Mk2

    The autumn is upon us, Nights are drawing in, the garden needs tidying before winter, there are a score of household seasonal maintenance jobs that need doing before the weather breaks, but why waste ideal modeling weather! So what better to accompany those long dismal dark evenings staring at "the Leg Iron" over a plate of Findus crispy pancakes and pot noodle, than a build that`ll frustrate the bejesus out of you! I`m Granto, you may remember me from previous threads such as DML Saladin ++ and "first build in donkeys years", well don't let that put you off, here`s my remedy to Seasonal affected disorder, DML`s Conqueror Mk 2! (cue fanfare) No, trust me, I`m a doctor! So here it is.................I couldn't wait to get my hands on this when I first heard about it, and I spent hours trawling the interweb looking for news, and then came the reviews. I couldn't believe they had got it so wrong, but a part of me still wanted to believe, so I kept the faith, and Brothers and Sisters the good Lord of plastic spoke unto to me in a dream! And he said that my faith would show me the way and that I should show that way unto you, my good Brothers and Sisters, so here tiz`! So, we've all read the reviews about Dragon and their black label series, being a sceptic and believing everyone is selling something or can be bought I parted with my spondulicks for the kit as soon as it became available, I compared my kit with various "experts" opinion and I thought there was a build here, just as I believe there is a worthwhile build in their M103! ( yes, it`s a big job but are you a modeler or an assembler?) Dimensionally the kit is good apart from the main armament, there are a few items out of position by a couple of MM here and there, but the basics are there and as I go through the build I will show how I overcame those that are an issue, there was one review though that really got my back up, the reviewer categorically stated that one major flaw "couldn't be corrected without major surgery", well I got you there big man, because for once I am blessed with knowledge denied to lesser mortals! At that point I knew I could I could do a proper correction to this error and build a decent representation of a Conqueror Mk2! Conqueror has always been one of my favorite tanks, One sat as the gate guardian at the Junior Leaders Regiment at Stanley barracks, Bovington when I was there, I climbed all over and inside of it, and she`s still there to this day, a behemoth of the cold war battlefield. Conqueror was developed, as was the M103, to kill soviet tanks at extreme range with her 120mm gun whilst sitting one bound behind the more numerous Centurions with their 20 pounder guns. Conqueror was not designed to accompany the Cent`s and therefore was not given the same kit or design features, she didnt have a boat shaped hull to deflect mine explosions because she wasn't supposed to encounter mines by virtue of the fact her job was overwatch not patrolling, her gun kit didnt work until she went over 1.5 mph, Centurion`s worked all the time whatever, despite being over twenty tons heavier she had the same meteor engine (albeit fuel injected) and a similar merit-brown crash gearbox. As far as the Army were concerned she was nothing more than a glorified mobile pillbox! There were 20 Mk1 vehicles built which were used for troop trials, these took place while the construction of the MK2`s were under way and the two marks differed in some respects, there were a host of internal changes but the most visible difference is to the front of the hull, and this is what wound me up in the review! Conqueror`s hull was constructed from armour plate, the thickest being the upper and lower glacis which was 5 inches thick and angled at 60 degrees. Behind this formidable armour sat the driver and a whole heap of ready rounds, however the design committee were not satisfied that the weld seam between the upper glacis and the roof plate was able to withstand an impact from an explosive or AT round, they also felt that the join to the roof plate was weakened further by it`s proximity to the three episcopes provided for the driver. Rather than a redesign, the most economical and practical solution was to reinforce the the join by an applique patch that was chamfered to the rear to resemble a very thin wedge and lapped at the front to engage with the top of the glacis plate in addition two of the episcopes were deleted as it was felt that the vehicle, being one bound behind, would not necessarily be driven closed down for long periods. these modifications were incorporated into the vehicle during construction of the hull giving the now characteristic crease across the hull roof, there was no internal difference due to this modification. This as you will see is probably the easiest fix in the history of modeling! An applique patch! Hardly major surgery is it? Anyway, enough of my ranting, in accordance with modeling law here are the guts! One sheet of manufacturers opinions, double sided! Hull top and bottom, Nice detail, big Dragon sprue gates! Turret and mantlet sleeve. DS tracks! Optics and headlight lenses. As is usual with Dragon, you get sprue duplication. There is some very nice detail on here, all apart from the big drainpipe on the left! Hideous .30cal! Again, it`s not all bad news! Plastic everywhere! Here`s the Conky next to Zero Echo! Hehehehehehe She`s a big old girl! Oh, I almost forgot the drainpipe.................................................... OMG! S`lush! But wont I need to solder the bits? No you Donkey! It all screws together! Sweeeeeet! Sooo Sweeeeet! So there you have it Brothers and Sisters, Conqueror coming! Shed first thing in the morning! Ta for lookin` no "G" Granto
  2. Good evening, first proper build post from me on the forums! Well it all started after a trip to the Midland Air Museum in Coventry where I got the fantastic chance to get inside an Avro Vulcan and see what it was like inside, and by god what an aircraft! I wish I had taken a lot more photographs but thanks to a thread that I found on the forums prior to joining, I found a nice walkaround inside of the cockpit. This was then followed by an enquiry to the Vulcan To The Sky Trust and after they gave me a few pages of the crew manual showing the details of both the front and rear cockpit, they also suggested getting a book which included the manual and infinitely more in-depth images. (The Vulcan Story 1952-2002 by Tim Laming) And so it began, all made of plasticard with the seat cushions made of milliput. Obviously there is still A LOT of work to do I think it is coming along nicely and the 3 panels shown at the end were made today with clear plastic used to serve as the ground scanning radar screen and a few dials. Thanks for that, cue the images! Sam And so after an hour of fannying around with Google+, Flickr and now Photobucket, the photos now work!
  3. A kind friend in the USA bought me this old Academy kit. I won't build it quite 'OOB' - I'll definitely add the Eduard brass set - or part of it - and i need to move the crane, which is in the wrong place. I may also decide to use the 'late' bin-fit, rather than the early as on the picture here - but to begin with it doesn't make any difference to the build. So here we go. Out of order, of course - who needs instructions?
  4. This is my T-62 built as a Syrian machine used during the Yom Kippur War with Israel in 1973. The kit is from Trumpeter, and was lots of fun to build. I understand there are problems with the contours of the hatches, and some other things, but whatever. The kit was a lot of fun to build, and detail. I added by own plumbing for the spare tanks and replaced grab handles with wire. Some day I'll add a figure. Paints are Model MAster Acrylics, and all weathering was done with washes. About four or five different shades. I also utilized some pencil graphite on edges and scratches, as well as baking soda for sandy silt textures. Please excuse the weird colors, this was photographed indoors under two junky lamps.
  5. P204(f) Armoured Scout Vehicle Revell 1:35 The Panhard 178 (officially designated as Automitrailleuse de Découverte Panhard modèle 1935, 178 being the internal project number at Panhard) or "Pan-Pan" was an advanced French reconnaissance 4x4 armoured car that was designed for the French Cavalry before World War II. It had a crew of four and was equipped with an effective 25 mm main armament and a 7.5 mm coaxial machine gun. A number of these vehicles were in 1940 taken over by the Germans after the Fall of France and employed as the Panzerspähwagen P204 (f); for some months after the armistice of June production continued for the benefit of Germany. After the war a derived version, the Panhard 178B, was again taken into production by France. The first unit which was given the new armoured car was the 6e Cuirassiers, in April 1937. By 1939 there were eleven squadrons using 218 vehicles. By the spring of 1940, the 21e Escadron (later 4e GRDI) saw action in Norway. By May-June 1940, the 370+ vehicles were allocated to reconnaissance squadrons organic to mechanized and armoured divisions. The Divisions Légères Mécaniques (DLM) in particular had 40 vehicles each, plus 4 radio and 4 reserve. In Divisions Légères de Cavalerie (DLC), complement was 12+1+4. Mechanized Infantry divisions (GRDI) also used the type with sixteen vehicles each. By May 1940, one of these units conducted skirmishes with advanced elements of the Wehrmacht in Holland, near Hertogenbosch. They also engaged German elements in Belgium, conducting a successful fighting retreat, then engaged with reconnaissance columns at the Battle of Hannut. German vehicles were similarly equipped with 20 mm (0.79 in) gun, but did little damage to the Panhard’s armour. After the fall of France, the German army captured or obtained 190 vehicles, some brand new, as Panzerspähwagen P204 (f). They saw heavy action during Operation Barbarossa, 107 being lost in 1941, as well as converted to Panzerspähwagen (Funk) P204 (f) (with a bed frame antenna), still soldiering by 1943 on the Eastern Front. By that time, many received spaced armour. 43 more were converted in 1941 as railway patrollers (Schienenpanzer). The Vichy regime used 64 vehicles for police duties (with the gun replaced by a machine-gun), later captured by the Germans in November 1942. 34 of these were converted as open-top carriers for 50 mm (1.97 in) L/42 or L/60 guns by 1944, staying in France. None of the vehicles planned in 1939 for North African service were sent. Instead, the bulk was absorbed by De Gaulle’s 10e cuirassiers, 4e DCR. However, four modified colonial vehicles with the smaller ZT-2 turret were sent to Indo-China (Vietnam). One was captured by the Japanese. After the war, Panhard 178B were sent in French Indo-China for counter-insurgency operations. Others saw service until the early 1960s at Djibouti or with the Syrians. These vehicles were generally considered fast, reliable, easy to drive and with a quiet engine, but at the same time suffered from several issues: a weak clutch, slow turret rotation, cramped interior, unreliable radio sets, poor cross-country drive and very noisy brakes. The Model Originally issued by ICM in 2015, Revell have now re-released the kit with new decals. The kit is packaged in the standard Revel end open box, (I wish they’d stop this habit), with a nice representation of the vehicle on the front. Inside there are four sprues of grey styrene, four rubber tyres, and a small decal sheet. All the parts are very nicely moulded, with no sign of flash or other imperfections and very few moulding pips. Since the kit has a full interior there are quite a few parts, also the fact that there are a few versions of this kit there are also quite a few parts that will end up in the spares box. Construction begins with the fighting compartment floor being glued to the lower hull, followed by the rear driver’s bulkhead and both drivers seats. The longitudinal bulkhead between the rear driver’s compartment and engine compartment is then glued into position, followed by the eleven piece engine. The drivers steering columns and steering wheels are next, along with the gear sticks and foot pedals. The rear drivers transverse bulkhead is then fitted as is the rack of shells for the main gun, which is glued to the fighting compartment bulkhead. Each of the two sides of the hull has a door that can be posed either open of closed. On the inside of each side there is a plethora of ammunition drums, for the machine gun, to be glued into position, along with the driver’s instruments and a spare machine gun. The sides are then glued to the lower hull, followed by the front and read bulkheads and front glacis plate. The rear mounted engine deck is then attached, along with the fighting compartment roof. The engine louvers and rear mid-bulkhead hatch are then attached, and can all be posed open should the modeller wishes. The rear wheel arch mounted storage boxes are then fitted and finished off with their respective doors. Fortunately, the running gear an suspension on this kit is really simple, just the two axles with two piece differentials and drive shafts are assembled, the four suspension spring units are then fitted to the underside of the hull, followed by the axles/drive shafts. The steering linkages are then attached, along with the brake accumulators, drop links, horn and towing hooks. The wheels are each made up from two part wheels and a rubber tyre. Once assembled the four wheels are glued onto their respective axles. The rest of the hull is then detailed with grab handles, door handles, pioneer tools, headlights and a rack on the rear bulkhead. The turret is then assembled; beginning with the co-axial machine gun, which is assembled from three parts before being fitted to the left hand front of the turret. The main gun comes in two halves, which once joined together are fitted with the trunnion mounts and elevation wheel. This is fitted to the turret ring along with the turret traverse mechanism. The turret ring and turret are then joined and the commanders and gunners seats are assembled and glued into position. The commander’s hatch is fitted with a handle and vent before being fitted into position. The two rear hatches on the turret can be posed open or closed. There are two, two piece periscopes fitted forward on the turret roof, and two lifting eyes on the rear sides. The completed turret is then fitted to the turret ring on the hull, and the last parts added. These include the two, two piece drivers viewing ports, which can also be posed open, the two piece exhaust silencer, wing mirrors and four miscellaneous panels. Decals There are two decal options, the decals are ok, although they appear a little fuzzy around the edges, although they have good opacity and are in register. The options are:- Wehrmacht, Operation Barbarossa, Eastern Front, Russia, 1941 – 1942 in overall panzer grey. Wehrmacht, Anti-Partisan Role, France, 1944 in overall yellow, with red and green squiggles. Conclusion It would be nice if Revell actually produced more kits of their own, but while we wait for them to do that, we can have at least this nice kit from ICM. With the interior it allows all the panels and hatches to be posed open, and the grey plastic is actually better than the original ICM colour. It would certainly be a good kit to practice your internal weathering on. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit
  6. Miscellaneous Items for IBG Rosomak APC 1:35 Master The IBG Rosomak Polish armoured personnel carrier is a superb kit in its own right. But, naturally, MASTER models have found a way of improving it with the three sets reviewed here. [GM-35-013] – Although designed for the IBG kit, this single straight aerial set could be used on other vehicles. The set includes the aerial, the aerial spring base and two elements, as MASTER describe them. These elements are attached to the base, and are in fact protective covers for the aerial base if the aerial itself is removed, so you only need to fit one. Suffice to say they are very small and well protected in their foam square within the package. [GM-35-014] – Another aerial set for the Rosomak, or any other vehicle with a similar aerial set up. This set includes the aerial, bent spring base, the same elements as above, a small sheet of etched brass and a length of fine cord. The aerial is glued to the base unit along with the elements, then, one of the PE tensioning rope rings is bent to shape and slide over the top of the aerial, while another pair of rings are attached to the turret with two brass rivets, for which a 0.5mm hole is required. The cable is run from one turret ring, via a carabineer and cable mounted eye ring, through the aerial ring and back to the other turret ring, with the same set up as the first ensuring it has the right tension. [GM-35-015] – Smoke grenade launchers. This set is for the Rosomak vehicles with the 30mm turret. It consists of a resin plate, brass launcher tubes, two types of resin covers and five brass rivets. The brass tubes are fitted into the tubes on the resin plate, the choice of cover decided upon and attached. The plate is then fitted to the kit turret and five 0.5mm holes drilled, into which the brass rivets are glued. Conclusion Here we have three more very useful and attractive sets. The aerial look great, but are easily bent and care should be taken if displaying near children, particularly at shows, as they are very sharp and could easily hurt someone looking too closely. The smoke launcher set is very nice, but prepare to test your eyes with the rivets. This goes for the cable attachment points on the bent aerials set too. Review sample courtesy of Piotr at
  7. Quad Rocket Launcher 1:35 MENG Arriving in a brown cardboard box with a black label, on which a faint outline of a pick-up truck is just visible. On the back of the truck, or Technical as they are sometimes known, is a slightly brighter outline of a rocket launcher. It is this launcher that is the subject of the model inside. MENG have released a number of these Technicals, in both vanilla and armed with a variety of weapons that the users seem so adept at fitting to them. They are now releasing separate weapons systems for you to do your own conversions. Inside the box there are three bubblewrap bags with various amounts of resin parts in them. There are nineteen parts in total, in a dark grey resin. All the parts are well moulded with very little sign of flash or other imperfections and all with the thinnest of attachment points to their moulding blocks, so removal and cleaning up shouldn’t be too much of a problem. Construction begins, once all the parts have been separated and washed in warm soapy water, with the joining of the two pairs of two launchers, on above the other, plus the base plate, two trunnion plates and a gear elevation quadrant. The two support plates are attached to the trunnion plates and thence to the five piece launcher base turntable, a hand wheel, locking leaver and foot pedals. On the right hand side there is an actuator unit fitted. The two part support stand is then assembled and the base unit glued to it. The whole assembly is fitted into your chosen vehicle. Conclusion This is certainly an unusual subject and one which could find use in many scenes and dioramas than the one it was intended. The moulding quality is superb and the completed unit will look quite effective with a bit of weathering. Review sample courtesy of
  8. Hi Pals, I finish working with this model. I have seen that it is a fairly simple kit, without major problems for assembly, with very good instructions. The tracks, are the originals, which although vinyl and not the best option, are "Tamiya", which is always a guarantee of quality, and have been very easy to assemble (they are wide and with 4 points of union instead of 2). I have chosen not to overload with extra equipment the vehicle, because it is in question to choose between there is a lot of equipment or lose the painting / detailed work underneath (detail cast, weathering ...). I have improved as much as possible, without complicating myself too much, some details of the kit, such as crystals for the periscopes, and the knobs of the boxes of spare parts, that I had spare in my box of pieces ... Still, I added something extra besides what the kit brings, crates boxes, ammo boxes, backpack, several, and wire roll. Although this is an old kit, modestly I think you could still get a good result, (I am reasonably happy with it), I have chosen to make the Marine version in Vietnam. I thank you all the fellows of the forum who have accompanied me in the assembly process and encouraged me with their comments to improve / continue. I include a link to the WIP section, in case someone is interested in seeing the post. Some shots details... And a bit of information... And I add some photos that I found in Google, very appropriate IHMO I think, of course only for information and with all rights for its legitimate authors. This is in the assault of Hue ... Thx to all for watch and comment, cheers mates
  9. Soviet Assault Infantry 1:35 MiniArt MiniArt have a great selection of figures in their catalogue, the latest set is of five Soviet assault infantry with winter camouflage cloaks. Each of the five men are in different poses, which look similar to tank rider positions. Only the figure with the DP light machine gun is really in a firing position, although two others look in a pretty high state of readiness, whilst the other two look more relaxed. Each figure is made from multiple parts, with separate torso, legs, arms and head. To the assembled body, there are three parts for the hood of the cloak and the various weapons each is holding. There are a number of different styles of pouches, but these aren’t used on the figures, but could be used separately, hanging from a tree or armoured vehicle. There are three different weapons included, the PPSh-41 with its distinctive drum magazine a separate part. Four of these assault weapons are provided, but you only need to use them with three figures. The DP light machine gun is assembled with a separate disc magazine, front sight and bi-pod, with the option of pose extended or folded. There is another light machine gun, which I cannot identify in the kit, very similar to the DP, but with a metal, folding stock should you wish to use it. There are three rifles provided, two Mosin–Nagant rifles, one standard, with separate bolt section and one PU sniper rifle with bolt section and separate telescopic sight. There is also a Mosin–Nagant carbine, but not used. Conclusion The parts are nicely moulded, but there does appear to be some seams that will need removing and quite a few moulding pips. Assembly is pretty straight forward and they will look great in a winter scene diorama. The biggest headache will be painting them to look realistic. Review sample courtesy of
  10. Model T LCP. 1:35

    Model T LCP ICM 1:35 One of the most numerous and famous cars in the world’s history was the Model T, produced by the Ford Motor Company. These cars were widely used on all fronts during WWI. In particular the Australian Mounted Division had some British Ford production Model T cars with Lewis machine guns mounted. These vehicles, called the LCP, (Light Car Patrol), saw combat in Egypt and Palestine in 1917 and 1918. The Model The model arrives in the usual sturdy box with a separate top sleeve with a nice artist’s representation of the vehicle on the front. Inside, within a large poly bag, are two sprues of light grey styrene and, in a separate poly bag, one clear sprue. On initial inspection the parts are really well moulded, clean, with no sign of flash. There are a number of moulding pips, some of which are on quite fragile looking parts, so care should be taken when removing. The sprue gates attaching items like the the exhaust are also quite heavy and I can see these parts breaking if you’re not careful. The build starts with the nicely detailed engine with the block and gearbox halves glued together followed by the addition of the rocker covers, fan belt, dynamo, exhaust manifold, cooling fan, cooling pipes, and other sundry items. The radiator is moulded together with the front axle and just needs the radiator grille glued to it to complete the assembly. The radiator/axle is then glued to the front of the floor pan/chassis along with four eyebolts/engine mounting bolts. The two part fuel tank is then assembled and fitted to the chassis, along with the engine assembly. The rear axle, drive shaft and differential are built up from only three parts and fited to the underside of the chassis along with the two piece exhaust/silencer unit. The front and rear axle support frames are then added, as is the steering rack. The four wheels, moulded as single parts are glued to the axles and the instructions move to the body work. The truck bed is made up of the bed, sides, front and rear sections, in addition to the outer curved panels, bench seat and rolled up canvas cover. The gear stick and steering column are then fitted to the chassis as is the truck bed assembly. The two part battery is fitted to the driving compartment bulkhead, along with the coaming, doors and three foot pedals. This assembly is then fitted into position between the truck bed and engine compartment. Each of the two part bonnet sections are fitted with grab handles, then glued together, before being fitted to the engine bay. If you’re very careful, the modeller could cut the lower section of one side of the bonnet and fold it up along the hinge line to show off the engine. Each of the two styles of headlights and single tail light are assembled, as is the steering wheel and column and seat back/bulkhead. The machine gun mount is glued into position on the passenger side and fitted with the three piece Lewis machine gun. The model is completed with the fitting of the spare tyre, the headlights/tail light, a three piece storage box and three piece water container. Decals The small decal sheet contains identification numbers for two vehicles and a small crest for the radiator. The two vehicles are both painted in the overall sand scheme. Model T LCP, Dead Sea Region, Palestine 1918 Model T LCP, Palestine 1918 Conclusion It’s good to see these rather unusual vehicles being released, particularly for the WWI aficionados and also remembers the role played by the Australian forces during the Great War. Whilst not a complicated kit, certainly by ICM standards, it looks like it will build into a nice little model. Review sample courtesy of
  11. Greetings, all ! I present to you my recent work: test-build T-60 early series from MiniArt #35215 with interior pleasant viewing :-) foto is clicable
  12. T-54-3 (MiniArt;1:35)

    Greetings, all ! I present to you my recent work: test-build T-54-3 model 1951 from MiniArt #370007 pleasant viewing :-) foto is clicable
  13. 1945 King Tiger Takom/Ammo 1:35 Hitler, and therefore Nazi Germany was obsessed with bigger which they equated with better, and this was reflected in almost every aspect of arms production in the run-up to, and throughout World War II. After the Panzer IV had been matched by Allied designs, the Tiger addressed the balance back in their favour, becoming the most feared combatant from any force, despite several draw-backs of its design, such as a weak transmission, and a level of complexity that meant it was slow to manufacture, prone to break-downs and expensive to repair. Expecting the Allies to bring heavier tanks to the field before too long, the King Tiger, Tiger II, or Königstiger as the Sd.Kfz.182 was known came into existence, having begun development even before the war started. Porsche's ground-breaking and complex design was unsuccessful for this reason, while the Henschel proposal was taken forward to production, using the same underpowered Maybach engine that was barely adequate for the Tiger I, and taking on the sloped armour of the successful Panther to significantly increase the effective thickness of the armour whilst keeping weight down to a staggering 70 tonnes. The initial turrets had curved surfaces that were difficult to manufacture, and a redesign was necessary to cure this and remove the shot-trap under the mantlet, with the new design being known today as the Henschel turret, while the old design became the Porsche turret, although both were designed by Krupps. A weak transmission design, coupled with the underpowered engine ensured that many vehicles broke down in the field, and plans were in progress to improve both aspects with fuel-injection and a new drive-train, but were curtailed by the end of the war. Most of the initial order of 1,500 units were built under difficult circumstances due to bombing of the factories and the encroaching Allied forces, and despite its problems it became one of the icons of German tank design of WWII, with a number surviving to be placed in museums, with some still running. The Model We have had a few King Tiger (KT) kits in 1:35 over the years, but nothing new for quite a while, and at times the preferred brands have been hard to come by with prices reaching silly levels on eBay. Takom's new range of KT kits aims to provide a full set of these imposing tanks, with and without Zimmerit anti-mine coating, with Henschel and Porsche turrets, and with or without interiors. This should cater for almost every possibility, and if you like your tanks buttoned up, you won't be wasting the interior if you buy wisely. This special edition kit has been produced in an alliance with AMMO by Mig Jimenez. The types included from the box haven’t been released by Takom before, so you can add it to your collection without fear of duplication. It is ostensibly a 1945 King Tiger Ausf B with a Henschel Turret, but one of the options is to build it as a July 1945 Project with Infra Red sights, whilst the other is for a Standard March 1945 Late version. Inside the box are a lot of sprues, taking up almost all the available space. There are ten sprues, two hull parts and upper turret in a grey styrene, one sprue of clear parts, one small sheet of Photo-Etch (PE) brass, and decal sheet. The instruction guide is in the by-now-familiar Takom format, in landscape A4, with a separate booklet for the painting instructions. All the parts are beautifully moulded with no sign of flash or other imperfections, but there are quite a few moulding pips, and for those modellers who have an aversion to indie link tracks, look away as, although these are link and length, each individual link is connected to the sprue by no less than six gates which will require the nice tedious job of cleaning them up before fitting. Construction begins with the rather unusual start point of the upper hull and the fitting of the towing cables, pioneer tools, and the separate panel for the drivers and bow gunners hatches. Inside, there is a large panel glued to the inside of the glacis plate, along with the two periscopes. The three piece bow machine gun is then assembled and glued into the ball socket in the bow plate. Then, on the outside the rest of the ball mechanism is fitted, along with the armoured hood. The track guards are also added at this point, although I’d probably leave them off until the entire hull is complete and the tracks fitted. Each of the road wheels and the sprockets are made up from two parts whilst the idlers are three part units. Once the gearbox covers and axles have been fitted to the hull all the wheels can be attached to their relative axles. There is a separate lower glacis plate to be attached as well. With all the track links and lengths cleaned up it’s just a case of patience and following the build guide carefully, ensuring it sags in the correct places. If you’re following the instruction rigidly then you will be fitting the upper hull to the lower at this point then adding the upper bow mounted track guards, three piece bow mounted light and lower, inner gearbox covers, to which the towing shackles are attached. The rear bulkhead is fitted out with the engine gearbox cover, a smaller access hatch, two, three piece exhausts, exhaust covers, track puller, the two rear mudguards and rear mounted towing shackles. The completed bulkhead is then attached to the rear of the hull. On the rear upper hull alternative centre engine covers, one is fitted with three individual engine hatches each fitted with a ventilation style dome and two other access hatches. The alternative centre hatch is fitted with a single large hatch each with two ventilation domes. There are also alternative radiator covers, attached each side of the centre hatch, there have different grilles and on one style the grilles are covered by armour plate. Each of the centre mounted circular opening is covered by PE grilles. Each assembly is then glued into position. The turret is assembled next, with the single piece centre section of the turret fitted with the roof, inner rear bulkhead, gunners internal hatch framing, inner section of the commanders cupola, outer rear bulkhead gunners hatch actuator, in open or closed position, three piece gunners hatch, periscope cover, small access hatch and grab handles. The large eight piece rear mounted hatch is then attached with its hinge covers, along with the roof mounted ventilator cover or alternative cover plate. The turret base is fitted with the gun trunnion section via two trunnion mounts and then glued to the turret. The outer commanders cupola is fitted with the seven periscope covers before being glued into position. The turret is then further detailed with four sets of six track link brackets and ten links, two at the front and three at the rear on each side. The March 1945 version is fitted with the commanders four piece hatch and a four piece MG34 machine gun. The July 1945 is fitted out with the same style hatch, but instead of the machine gun there is an eleven piece infra red sight and searchlight, plus on each side of the turret there are covers for the new rangefinder. The five piece gun barrel is the same for both versions, but the mantlet is slightly different, each version made from three parts, but make sure you are using the correct mantlet. The completed turret is then attached to the hull, completing the build. Decals Since there are four decal/paint schemes for each of the two versions the paint instructions is quite large, but very well printed. So good in fact you could possible separate them and frame them should you wish. All the paint codes are for AMMO paints, but with the German names for each colour. There are six schemes with vehicle numbers; the other two just have generic crosses etc. The decals have been printed by AMMO and although only a small sheet they are nicely printed, in register with good opacity. The larger numbers though have quite prominent carrier film, so will need a good gloss coat before applying. The options are by the town they served in and include:- Standard King Tiger from Paderborn 1945 King Tiger, No. 304 based at Hamm 1945 King Tiger, No. 421 based in Koln 1945 King Tiger, No. 235, found at the Henschel Plant, February 1945 Infra Red fitted King Tiger, based in Wildau 1945 King Tiger, based in Gorlitz 1945 King Tiger, No 502, based in Saltsburg, Austria 1945 King Tiger, No 232, based in Kassel 1945 Conclusion This is a very nice kit, as we have come to expect from Takom, and it is an interesting alliance with AMMO. Although, if you’re going to do something with a paint company, at least include some paint in a special edition like this, even if it was of only one or two schemes. As a marketing ploy, which it after all it is having some paint in the box may have got some modellers moving over to those paints rather than just sticking with what they know. The track links are also a bit of a letdown, since the previous release, with interior had the links separate in poly bags, it’s strange Takom went with the link and length approach. Other than that a fairly easy build and will look great in any collection. Review sample courtesy of UK Distributors for
  14. Hello ! Decided to dilute the military theme with a civilian version of the German truck. If I placed it wrong, please correct it. This is a new MiniArt's set with civilian inscriptions, beer and milk boxes. I wanted to make it clean, but as always the tank turned out :-)
  15. Typ L3000S Light Truck. 1:35

    Typ L3000S Light Truck ICM 1:35 From 1940 onwards the German army, by standardizing and simplifying the numerous types of trucks, tried to improve the procurement of spare parts and facilitate repairs. The result was the standard 3 ton truck, which all German manufacturer snow used as a basis for construction. This was also the basis on which the motor manufacturer in Cologne produced the "V3000S" from 1941 onwards. Various bodies and sets of equipment were available. A typical recognition feature was the oval radiator grille and one-piece windscreen. In total about 25,000 examples were built. The "V 3000 S" came to be used on all fronts in the Second World War and was indispensable for supplying the troops with goods of all kinds. The Model This is an all new tooling, replacing the rather complicated older releases. The model arrives in a strong box with a separate top sleeve with a nice artist’s representation of the vehicle on the front. Inside, within a large poly bag, are three sprues of light brown styrene and, in a separate poly bag, one clear sprue. On initial inspection the parts are really well moulded, clean, with no sign of flash. There are a number of moulding pips, some of which are on quite fragile looking parts, so care should be taken when removing. The sprue gates attaching items like the cover rails are also quite heavy and I can see these parts breaking if not careful. The build starts with the nicely detailed engine with the block and gearbox halves glued together followed by the addition of the rocker covers, starter motor, alternator, front engine mounts, cooling fan, air filter, cooling pipes, gear stick and other sundry items. The instructions then move on to the chassis rails with the addition of five cross members and rear chassis end piece, to which the towing eye, cover and pin are added. To the top of the main rails the two sub rails are added. The front and rear leaf springs are fitted along with the rear axle and transfer box. Turning the rails over the engine can now be fitted plus the exhaust system, which comprises of seven parts, and looks particularly fragile so it may be an idea to build in situ rather than as a separate assembly the instructions call for. The two driveshafts are then be added, as are the radiator/front chassis end piece. The steering rack assembly is built up using the four parts provided and, if the modeller chooses can be built up so that the front wheels are posable, although this may make it rather fragile, particularly the rear tie rod. After fitting the various brackets and supports as well as the front bumper and tow hooks, it’s onto the wheels, these come as single piece tyres plus inner and outer hubs. There are seven provided, singles for the front, doubles for the rear and a spare which fits on the chassis behind the cab and under the bed The building of the cab begins with filing off the ejection pins marks on the underside of the floor, before fitting the pedals, steering column, steering wheel and handbrake handle. The seat support and cushion is fitted to the floor, whilst the windscreen, instrument panel, with decal instruments, are fitted to the roof/front part of the cab. Onto the rear panel of the cab the seat back and rear screen are attached. The next assembly for the cab is the bonnet, which is made up of left and right hand parts, bonnet and radiator grille. The completed bonnet cannot easily be made to be posed either open, which is a shame. To finish off the front, the mud guards/foot plates are attached along with the doors, which are made of the external panels, door cards, clear parts, and door handles. Last details are the wing mirrors, lights, wipers; grab handles, spade, triangular roof marker, jerry can and its support bracket. The last assembly is the truck bed, with the bed itself being fitted with the side, rear, and front plank sections. On the underside, five lateral strengthening beams, and two longitudinal beams are fitted. The spare wheel is also attached, along with two storage boxes, two three piece Jerry can cages, complete with four piece Jerry can, and the two wheel arch attachment sections. A third storage box and the two wheel arches are then fitted and the assembly is ready to be attached to be attached to the chassis. To complete the build the windscreen wipers, wing mirrors, grab handles, pioneer tools, headlamps, hood ornament and convoy triangle are glued into their respective positions. Decals Apart from the instruments mentioned above, the small decal sheet gives the modeller four options. The decals are nicely printed, clear and in good register with a slightly matt finish. The options:- Typ L3000S, Ukraine, Summer 1941, in Panzer Grey overall Typ L3000S, Russia, Summer 1942, in Panzer Grey overall Typ L3000S, North Africa, Summer 1942, in Africa Corp Brown Overall Typ L3000S, Italy, Summer 1944, in Dark Yellow overall with Olive Green stripey blotches. Conclusion This is another great truck kit from ICM and a much easier build than their previous releases. The details straight from the box are still good, and there is plenty of scope to add extra detail, particularly to the engine and the very empty cargo bed. Once built and weathered this truck will make a nice component to a multi-vehicle diorama, or on its own with a bit of imagination and some figures, one or two of which would have been nice to have been included in the kit. There doesn’t appear to be anything that would trouble anyone other than complete beginners, so I can quite happily recommend this nice and quite interesting truck. Review sample courtesy of
  16. Panzerspahwagen P204(f). 1:35

    Panzerspahwagen P204(f) ICM 1:35 The Panhard 178 (officially designated as Automitrailleuse de Découverte Panhard modèle 1935, 178 being the internal project number at Panhard) or "Pan-Pan" was an advanced French reconnaissance 4x4 armoured car that was designed for the French Cavalry before World War II. It had a crew of four and was equipped with an effective 25 mm main armament and a 7.5 mm coaxial machine gun. A number of these vehicles were in 1940 taken over by the Germans after the Fall of France and employed as the Panzerspähwagen P204 (f); for some months after the armistice of June production continued for the benefit of Germany. After the war a derived version, the Panhard 178B, was again taken into production by France. The first unit which was given the new armoured car was the 6e Cuirassiers, in April 1937. By 1939 there were eleven squadrons using 218 vehicles. By the spring of 1940, the 21e Escadron (later 4e GRDI) saw action in Norway. By May-June 1940, the 370+ vehicles were allocated to reconnaissance squadrons organic to mechanized and armoured divisions. The Divisions Légères Mécaniques (DLM) in particular had 40 vehicles each, plus 4 radio and 4 reserve. In Divisions Légères de Cavalerie (DLC), complement was 12+1+4. Mechanized Infantry divisions (GRDI) also used the type with sixteen vehicles each. By May 1940, one of these units conducted skirmishes with advanced elements of the Wehrmacht in Holland, near Hertogenbosch. They also engaged German elements in Belgium, conducting a successful fighting retreat, then engaged with reconnaissance columns at the Battle of Hannut. German vehicles were similarly equipped with 20 mm (0.79 in) gun, but did little damage to the Panhard’s armour. After the fall of France, the German army captured or obtained 190 vehicles, some brand new, as Panzerspähwagen P204 (f). They saw heavy action during Operation Barbarossa, 107 being lost in 1941, as well as converted to Panzerspähwagen (Funk) P204 (f) (with a bed frame antenna), still soldiering by 1943 on the Eastern Front. By that time, many received spaced armour. 43 more were converted in 1941 as railway patrollers (Schienenpanzer). The Vichy regime used 64 vehicles for police duties (with the gun replaced by a machine-gun), later captured by the Germans in November 1942. 34 of these were converted as open-top carriers for 50 mm (1.97 in) L/42 or L/60 guns by 1944, staying in France. None of the vehicles planned in 1939 for North African service were sent. Instead, the bulk was absorbed by De Gaulle’s 10e cuirassiers, 4e DCR. However, four modified colonial vehicles with the smaller ZT-2 turret were sent to Indo-China (Vietnam). One was captured by the Japanese. After the war, Panhard 178B were sent in French Indo-China for counter-insurgency operations. Others saw service until the early 1960s at Djibouti or with the Syrians. These vehicles were generally considered fast, reliable, easy to drive and with a quiet engine, but at the same time suffered from several issues: a weak clutch, slow turret rotation, cramped interior, unreliable radio sets, poor cross-country drive and very noisy brakes. The Model Originally issued by ICM in 2015, they have now re-released it with new parts to build a railway mounted vehicle. Inside the top opening box, with a nice representation of the vehicle on tracks, there are eight sprues of beige, (Caramac), coloured styrene, and a small decal sheet. All the parts are very nicely moulded, with no sign of flash or other imperfections and very few moulding pips. Since the kit has a full interior there are quite a few parts, also the fact that there are a few versions of this kit there are also quite a few parts that will end up in the spares box. Construction begins with the fighting compartment floor being glued to the lower hull, followed by the rear driver’s bulkhead and both drivers seats. The longitudinal bulkhead between the rear driver’s compartment and engine compartment is then glued into position, followed by the eleven piece engine. The drivers steering columns and steering wheels are next, along with the gear sticks and foot pedals. The rear drivers transverse bulkhead is then fitted as is the rack of shells for the main gun, which is glued to the fighting compartment bulkhead. Each of the two sides of the hull has a door that can be posed either open of closed. On the inside of each side there is a plethora of ammunition drums, for the machine gun, to be glued into position, along with the driver’s instruments and a spare machine gun. The large two piece radio set is then fitted to the left hand side of the fighting compartment. The sides are then glued to the lower hull, followed by the front and read bulkheads and front glacis plate. The rear mounted engine deck is then attached, along with the fighting compartment roof. The engine louvers and rear mid-bulkhead hatch are then attached, and can all be posed open should the modeller wishes. The rear wheel arch mounted storage boxes are then fitted and finished off with their respective doors. Fortunately, the running gear and suspension on this kit is really simple, just the two axles with two piece differentials and drive shafts are assembled, the four suspension spring units are then fitted to the underside of the hull, followed by the axles/drive shafts. The steering linkages are then attached, along with the brake accumulators, drop links, horn and towing hooks. The rail wheel with two additional rings fitted to the outer hub area. Once assembled the four wheels are glued onto their respective axles. The rest of the hull is then detailed with grab handles, door handles, pioneer tools, headlights and a rack on the rear bulkhead. The turret is then assembled; beginning with the co-axial machine gun, which is assembled from three parts before being fitted to the left hand front of the turret. The main gun comes in two halves, which once joined together are fitted with the trunnion mounts and elevation wheel. This is fitted to the turret ring along with the turret traverse mechanism. The turret ring and turret are then joined and the commanders and gunners seats are assembled and glued into position. The commander’s hatch is fitted with a handle and vent before being fitted into position. The two rear hatches on the turret can be posed open or closed. There are two, two piece periscopes fitted forward on the turret roof, and two lifting eyes on the rear sides. The completed turret is then fitted to the turret ring on the hull, and more parts added. These include the two, two piece drivers viewing ports, which can also be posed open, the two piece exhaust silencer, wing mirrors and four miscellaneous panels. Finally the large radio aerial bedstead is fitted to the two piece turret mounted swivel support and the two, two piece rear mount fixed supports. For display the kit includes a length of track which is made up from ten sleepers and two lengths of rail. Decals There are two decal options, the decals look pretty good, they have good opacity and are in register, printed by ICM themselves. The options are:- P204(f) Panzerdraisine, Russia 1943 – 1944 in overall yellow with red and green splotches. P204(f) Panzerdraisine, Panzer Zug No.64 armoured train, Eastern Front, 1943. Conclusion This is a great little kit and would certainly make a good talking point in your collection or on your clubs display table. With the interior, all the hatches and panels can be left open and maybe fitted with a small LED light to really look the business. It’s also a good basis for a diorama with the rails on a nicely made up base and some figures. Review sample courtesy of
  17. Russian T-37A Light Tank HobbyBoss 1:35 History The T-37A was a Soviet amphibious light tank. The tank is often referred to as the T-37, although that designation was used by a different tank which never left the prototype stage. The T-37A was the first series of mass-produced fully amphibious tanks in the world. The tank was first created in 1932, based on the British Vickers tankette and other operational amphibious tanks. Production started in 1933 up until 1936, when it was replaced with the more modern T-38, based on the T-37A. Overall, after four years of production, 2552 T-37A’s were produced, including the original prototypes. In the Red Army, they were used to perform tasks in communication, reconnaissance, and as defence units on the march, as well as active infantry support on the battlefield. The T-37A’s were used in large numbers during the Soviet invasion of Poland and in the Winter War against Finland. The T-37 A was also used by the Soviets in the beginning of the Great Patriotic War, but most of them were quickly lost. Surviving tanks of that type fought on the front lines until 1944, and were used in training and auxiliary defence until the end of World War II. The Model The kit is packaged in the standard Trumpeter style top opening box with an artistic representation of the tank emerging from a river. Inside, there are nine sprues, two separate hull parts moulded in green styrene, seven sprues of brown styrene, two small sheets of etched brass and a small decal sheet. As we have come to expect from Trumpeter, all the mouldings are very well produced, with no sign of flash or other imperfections and only a few moulding pips. The details are nicely reproduced and even the rivets seem about right for this type of tank. Although this is a very small tank, this kit comes with individual track links, which, whilst well moulded are joined to the sprue are three points, so not only will they take quite a bit of careful cleaning up, they will need a lot of patience putting a full run of eight six links per side together. Construction begins with the assembly of the road wheels and their suspension parts. Each pair of wheels is made up form eight parts and there are two pairs fitted per side. These assemblies are then fitted to the lower hull section, along with two return rollers per side and the idler wheel axle bearings. The sprocket wheel gearbox covers are attached followed by the sprocket wheels themselves. At the rear of the hull the propeller shaft housing and propeller are fitted, as is the propeller guard on the underside of the hull and the rudder. The idler wheels are then attached and the assembled tracks can be fitted. The upper hull is then glued to the lower hull and the separate engine cover fitted. There are a couple of areas on the upper hull that need to be removed in accordance to the instructions on each side of the front glacis plate and a couple of holes on the engine deck need to be opened up. The two, two piece watertight sponsons/fenders are assembled and fitted to the hull, along with the pioneer tools. The sponson fixing brackets are attached, fixing the sponsons to the front glacis plate and the frontal armour on the fighting compartment is fitted. The two piece exhaust is attached to the engine deck via four PE brackets, with further PE brackets being fitted around the upper hull. The engine intake grille is covered with PE mesh, and the drivers hatch is glued into place. The simple machine gun turret is fitted with the two piece machine gun, turret hatch, three vision ports and two PE plates. The external section of the machine guns ball socket is glued into position, meaning that the machine gun cannot be posed in anything other than straight without modification. The completed turret is then slotted into position on the hull, completing the build. Decals The small decal sheet only provides four different styles of turret stripe, one for each of the colour schemes included on the paint chart. T-37A, in Russian Green overall, red upper stripe with white dotted stripe below. T-37A, in Dark green overall, with blue stripe on white background. T-37A in Russian green overall, with red brown dots all over and solid red turret stripe over a red dotted stripe. T-37A in Grey green overall, with dark green spots and a thick solid red stripe on the turret. Conclusion Hobby boss have released quite a few of these small Russian tanks now and they still manage to find more to release. This is a great little kit of a very small tank, but will keep you busy for hours trying to get the tracks assembled and fitted. Probably not for the novice due to the tracks, as it may put them off indie links completely, but a nice addition to any tank collection, particularly if you like you tanks a little on the weird side. Highly Recommended Review sample courtesy of
  18. Sd.Kfz.184 Elefant. 1:35

    Sd.Kfz.184 Elefant Revell 1:35 The Elefant (German for "elephant") was a heavy tank destroyer used by German Wehrmacht Panzerjäger during World War II. It was built in small numbers in 1943 under the name Ferdinand after its designer Ferdinand Porsche, using tank hulls that had been produced for the Tiger I tank requirement which was rejected in favour of a Henschel design. In 1944, after modification of the existing vehicles, they were renamed Elefant. The official German designation was Panzerjäger Tiger (P) and the ordnance inventory designation was Sd. Kfz. 184. In September 1943, all surviving Ferdinands were recalled to be modified based on battle experience gained in the Battle of Kursk. During October and November 1943, 48 of the 50 surviving vehicles were modified by addition of a ball-mounted MG 34 in the hull front for anti-infantry ability, a commander's cupola (modified from the standard StuG III cupola) for improved vision, and the application of Zimmerit paste. The frontal armour was thickened and the tracks widened, increasing the weight from 65 to 70 t. The improved vehicles were called Elefant; this became the official name by Hitler's orders of May 1, 1944. Only two of these vehicles survived the war. One Ferdinand was captured by Soviet forces at Kursk, and is now at the Kubinka Tank Museum outside Moscow. An Elefant was captured at Anzio by the Americans, and is now part of the United States Army Ordnance Museum's collection at Fort Lee, VA. The example at Fort Lee was restored to display condition in 2007–2008, as documented on the show Tank Overhaul, but not in its original paint scheme. It was announced in 2016 that the Fort Lee Elefant would be loaned to the Bovington Tank Museum in Dorset, UK. The vehicle will be displayed as part of the museum's "Tiger Collection" display from April 2017. This display aims to bring all the members of the Tiger family together in one place for the first time. This has now actually happened, with the exception of one Tiger variant. The Model This kit has got to be one of the oldest moulds I have reviewed, being originally issued by Italeri in the 1960’s. Saying that, the moulds have certainly stood the test of time, as there is no sign of flash or other imperfections on the grey styrene. There are just two large sprues, two separate hull parts, four piece rubber tracks per side and a small decal sheet in the rather squishy end opening box. It looks like it will be a fairly simple build and there are still remnants of the old releases in the instructions where it tells you to melt the ends of the wheel within the hull so that they will rotate. Construction starts with the fitting of the axle inserts and gearbox covers into the lower hull. The sprockets, idlers and road wheels are all two part assemblies. The sprockets and idlers are then fitted to their respective positions, along with the mud scrapers and front stops. The six suspension units are each made up from four parts before being attached to the hull. The twelve road wheels are then fitted to the axles, followed by their hub caps. The four piece rubber tracks are joined together by melting the pins on each section, the tracks are then fitted around the sprockets and idlers so that the teeth on each mesh and around the road wheels. The driver is provided with a six piece seating arrangement which includes the control levers. This is then fitted to the bow section of the lower hull, with a separate seat for the machine gunner. Both crew members are provided each with separate upper and two lower body parts with separate arms. The driver is also fitted with a three piece headset. The upper and lower glacis plates are then fitted to the front of the lower hull along with the two piece vertical section which includes the machine gun position into which the MG34 is glued. The track guards are then attached, followed by the guard supports. The engine deck is then fitted with the centre grille; grab handles and lifting eyes, before being glued into position. The “turret section” is fitted out inside with the commanders seat and support, backplate of the gun and the two piece gun barrel which includes a large ball to fit within the fighting compartment. Externally the section is fitted with the commanders cupola, mantle cover, lifting hooks, gunners hatch and outer gun plates. The travel lock is made up from three pieces and glued to the front decking between the drivers and machine gunners hatches. The completed fighting compartment is them glued into position, and the commander figure assembled before he is placed standing on his seat. The rest of the build includes attaching the towing shackles, storage boxes, exhaust box, spare track links, stowage hooks and coiled towing cables. Decals There are two decal options, the decals are ok, although they appear a little fuzzy around the edges, and they have good opacity and are in register. The options are:- 1st Company of the 653rd Heavy Panzerjager Battalion, Soriano al Cimino, Italy, 27/06/1944 2n/3red Company of the 653rd Heavy Panzerjager Battalion, Eastern Front, Russia/Poland, 1944 Conclusion Considering how old this kit is, the moulds are surviving remarkably well, there is no sign of wear for flash on the parts and everything appears to be as crisp as the day they were made. It’s a relatively simple kit to put together, but with care, a good paint job and weathering, it can be made into a very nice model. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit
  19. Sherman Firefly Vc C. Squadron 20th NZ Armoured Regt. Italy, Spring 1945 Almost two years since I last finished/posted an AFV build... Well as this is written it's exactly five years since we moved here to NZ and by coincidence here's a Kiwi subject. Tasca's superb Sherman Firefly Vc with kit decals and a few extras - RB barrel, Verlinden stowage and Royal Models radio/storage bustle - The markings are for a vehicle from C Squadron 20th (NZ) Armoured Regt. in Italy right at the end of the war. From the outset I had in my mind exactly how I wanted it to look and (for once), got precisely what I was after. Not muddy just very, very dusty. I spent sometime researching articles and opinions on the late war British 'Drab' colour and most books/commentators seem to agree it was virtually the same as US Olive Drab but faded to a much greener hue than the American colour so that's what I aimed for - whether I achieved that is for others to say. On top of the self mixed Tamiya acrylic paint there's some dry-brushing with oils, chipping and scratches, an oil-dot wash to get the streaking and just two tones of Mig pigments to get the dusty look. Now that it's done I am very pleased with it, so much so that I've dug-out an Academy M18 Hellcat that I started around eight years ago to sit alongside it - similar gun y'see !! - you'll see that in a few weeks. As ever thanks for taking the time to look and/or comment and please feel free to make any criticism or ask any questions. AFN. Ian.
  20. Miscellaneous Items 1:35 Master The latest releases from Master Models in their series of replacement pitot probes have recently arrived at BMs London offices. They are well up to their usual standard and very sharp, so care should be taken once fitted. They are so much better than the styrene ones found in the kits. I really like the way they protect the resin parts, which have as much detail as the metal items do. [AM-35-003] – Has been designed for the big Trumpeter Mil Mi 24 Hind and contains The set includes turned aluminium boom for DUAS probe, resin DUAS vanes, resin and brass parts for JakB-12.7 machine gun. [GM-35-012] – This set is for the new KTO Rosomak from IBG Models, although can be used on any vehicle kit that uses this gun. The set includes turned brass part and resin muzzle break Conclusion Here we have another pair of really useful and well produced items. The Hind set is really well done with the resin parts so beautifully moulded, as is the Bushmasters muzzle brake. Simple to assemble and use they are an easy way to give your model a lift. Review sample courtesy of Piotr at
  21. T-34/85 Running Gear Late Type 1:35 MiniArt The parts in this track and wheel set from MiniArt are suitable for their T-34/85 plus SU-85, SU-100 and SU-122 kits. There are 10 sprues of the track links with guide horns and 7 lengths of the intermediate links. The 10 sprues with the horned track links also contain the main road wheels. There are also two sprues with idler wheels and a small panel plus another two sprues with the drive wheels, which also have a stowage box with separate lids. The links with the guide horns have small pins on then which are designed to click into holes on the intermediate links. Conclusion While these links do indeed look good, while attempting to get a set to link together to include in the review I found that they would not "click" together easily. I found that the pins in the guide horn links would often bend over, rather than click into the receiving holes. With these it's a one-shot deal, as once they have bent there is no easy way of getting them back, so you end up with track links that you have to glue together. The wheels are very well moulded, and look great with the markings on the edges of the tyres also represented. Review sample courtesy of
  22. Munitionschlepper auf PzKpfw 1 Ausf A with Ammo Trailer HobbyBoss 1:35 History The Panzer I was a light tank produced in Germany in the 1930s. The name is short for the German Panzerkampfwagen I ("armoured fighting vehicle mark I"), abbreviated PzKpfw I. The tank's official German ordnance inventory designation was SdKfz 101 ("special purpose vehicle 101"). Design of the Panzer I began in 1932 and mass production began in 1934. Intended only as a training tank to introduce the concept of armoured warfare to the German Army, the Panzer I saw combat in Spain during the Spanish Civil War, in Poland, France, the Soviet Union and North Africa during the Second World War, and in China during the Second Sino-Japanese War. Experiences with the Panzer I during the Spanish Civil War helped shape the German Panzerwaffes' invasion of Poland in 1939 and France in 1940. By 1941, the Panzer I chassis design was used as the basis of tank destroyers and assault guns. There were attempts to upgrade the Panzer I throughout its service history, including by foreign nations, to extend the design's lifespan. It continued to serve in the Spanish Armed Forces until 1954. The Panzer I's performance in combat was limited by its thin armour and light armament of two machine guns. As a design intended for training, the Panzer I was not as capable as other light tanks of the era, such as the Soviet T-26. Although weak in combat, it formed a large part of Germany's tank forces and was used in all major campaigns between September 1939 and December 1941. The small, vulnerable light tank would be surpassed in importance by other German tanks, such as the Panzer IV, Panther, and Tiger; nevertheless, the Panzer I's contribution to the early victories of Nazi Germany during World War II was significant. Later in that war the turrets of the then obsolete PzKpfw Is and PzKpfw IIs were repurposed as gun turrets on specially built defensive bunkers, particularly on the Atlantic Wall. Whilst the turrets were reused, so were the hulls some being fitted out as tank destroyers, small command tanks and munitionschleppers, the subject of this kit. The Model This is the fourth ex-Tristar kit, (originally released in 2011), to be reviewed on BM and it follows the same pattern as those of the Panzer IV Tauch, and the Panzer 38(T) in that the box art is the same as the Tristar packaging with the colour artists impression surrounded by a yellow boarder. As with the other kits, all the parts are beautifully moulded, with the sprues and separate lower hull and turret in a sandy yellow styrene. There are nine sprues in the yellow styrene, one of clear styrene. There are also three sprues of dark grey styrene for the track links, one sheet of etched brass, two small springs and a smallish decal sheets. There is no sign of flash or other imperfections, but there are quite a few moulding pips that will need to be cleaned up. Looking at the parts count and layout, it doesn’t appear to be a complicated build, with perhaps the exception of the individual track links, which look like they will need careful removal from the sprues and I know some modellers still don’t like. Construction begins with the interior which is made up of the fighting compartment floor, transmission tunnel, rear bulkhead, transmission outtake, nine piece transmission, stowage boxes, and torsion beams. The hull is then built up around the fighting compartment, which is further detailed with the drivers seat, transfer shafts and inner gearbox covers, along with more stowage boxes, and other equipment which I cannot identify. The road wheels consist of the inner wheel section, with tyre and two separate inner and outer rims. These are then attached to the two piece leaf suspension units. The idler wheel is fitted to its separate suspension unit, whilst the sprocket is a three piece assembly attached to the outer gearbox cover. The wheel assemblies are then attached to the hull and the two road wheel sets joined by a connecting beam. The task of fitting the tracks comes next, but it may be better to leave until nearer the end of the build. The upper and lower glacis plates are fitted, as are the two fuel tanks in the engine compartment. The engine itself is made up from no less than twenty one parts before being fitted into the compartment and connected up. The track guards are then attached and the right hand one fitted with a stowage box and bracket. Before fitting the working compartment the radio sets need to be fitted to the inside of the roof, along with a hatch lock and a couple of other brackets. The assembly is then attached to the hull, along with the radiator and supports in the engine bay. The five piece engine bay cover is then attached along with the optionally positioned hatches. The two exhausts are fitted, one either side of the engine bay on the rear track guards, as is the transmission hatch, “turret” side and top hatches, which can all be posed open to show off the lovely interior. The three piece PE mudflaps are then attached to the front of the track guards, whilst the rear mud flaps are all styrene. To the rear bulkhead the external telephone box is attached as is the five piece towing arm. The tank is then fitted out with the various pioneer tools and PE exhaust covers. Assembly of the trailer begins with the ammunition. There are four rows of shells, sixteen armour-piercing and sixteen high explosive. These are fitted into racks vertically, and surrounded with the trailer sides and the bottom. The hatches on top can be posed open for diorama use and are fitted with latches and a locking bar. The trailer itself is made up from the chassis, axle, suspension arms, and ten other parts. The metal springs form part of the suspension system and are locked off with end caps. The single piece wheels are then fited to the axle and finished off with a locking cap. The ammunition box is then attached and the completed trailer attached to the tanks towing system. Decals The small decal sheet contains to types of national markings and two id plates. Whilst small it is nicely printed and in register, and, fortunately very opaque, being mostly white. Conclusion I was pleasantly surprised with this kit having a full interior, excellent news for those who like to have all the hatches open or for use in a diorama. It’s only small, but they have packed a lot into it, and it builds into something less run of the mill for your collection. Review sample courtesy of
  23. Soviet SU-18 Self-Propelled Howitzer HobbyBoss 1:35 History Initial experience with tanks in the Soviet Union was related to captured foreign models (British and French) used by the Whites during the Civil War. However, in 1920, fourteen burned-out captured French Renault FTs were dismantled, studied and replicated by the Krasnoye Sormovo Factory. Fifteen exact replicas delivered in 1922, called the “Russki Reno”. These were the first locally-built Soviet tanks in service. However, they were plagued by manufacturing defects, but gave enough experience to the Russian engineers to plan a new model. This came with the formation of a “tank bureau” in 1924, which was charged with writing a specification for the first Soviet indigenous model. This called for a 3-ton tank (later 5) capable of a 12 km/h (7.5 mph) speed, having 16 mm (0.63 in) of armour and armed with a 37 mm (1.46 in) gun, similar to the French Puteaux design, but with a longer barrel. In November 1929 ANII K. M. Ivanov, commissioned by the UMM RKKA produced a self-propelled gun based on the T-18, as well as the ammunition carrier for it. The prototype was a captured French Renault FT-17BS. The SU-18 kept the same design as the French vehicle, but replaced the turret with one that resembles a truncated pyramid. The SU-18 used the 76.2-mm regimental gun model 1927 with a slotted muzzle brake to reduce rollback. It had an ammunition capacity of 4-6 rounds and no machine guns. Other prototypes were created using a high power 37-mm PC-2 gun and a 45-mm model 1930 tank gun, which was planned to be installed on T-24 tanks. Armour consisted of 5–7 mm thick plates. The ammunition carrier could hold 10 trays with 50 rounds each of 76.2 mm shells, or 16 trays of 169 shells each 37mm or 45mm guns. The crew consisted of one driver and one gunner. The decision to build the SU-18 was made on June 11 and stipulated the delivery of a prototype by October 10, 1930. However, due to the small ammunition capability and the limitations of the T-18 (a narrow gauge chassis and a high center of gravity) the design was abandoned in favour of larger and better self-propelled gun designs and further work on the SU-18 was stopped. The Model The kit comes in a standard Hobbyboss top opening, and quite attractive box, with an artistic representation of the tank trundling along in the country. Inside there are five sprues of beige, almost caramac, (for those old enough to remember), coloured styrene, three separate parts for the hull, turret and turret base, two brown sprues of track links, a small photo etch sheet and a small decal sheet. The parts are really well moulded with no flash and only a few moulding pips needing removal. Although not to everyones taste, the track links, whilst pretty small, are beautifully moulded, and fortunately only 102 required, (51 per side), which isn’t so bad considering the small size of the links. Considering the small size of the model, it’s nice to see that Hobbyboss haven’t gone mad on the detail as they have done in the past, particularly the suspension. The main suspension units are moulded as a single piece and all the modeller has to do is add the wheels. There are two units with four wheels and single unit with six wheels per side. The completed units are glued into position on the lower hull, followed by a single return roller aft and a six wheeled bank forward. The idler axles and sprocket gear covers are attached, followed by the front glacis plate and single shackle at the front. On each side of the front hull there is a two piece bracket. The left hand one is fitted with a headlamp, whilst the right hand one si fitted with a horn. Both the sprocket and idler wheels on each side are two piece affairs, which, when assembled are glued into position. The two hatches that cover the driving position are each given a grab handle and glued into place. With the lower hull done, it’s onto the so called turret. The howitzer itself is made up from seven parts for the recoil slide and four for the gun itself. The assembly is then glued to the floor plate, which in turn is glued to the support brackets below it. The turret is then slide over the barrel and glued into position, followed by the two rear doors, each with separate grab handles. The turret rings of the original FT-17 is fitted with angle plates and grab handles before having the two track guards attached and the drivers viewing port. The turret is then attached to the original ring assembly before the whole lot is glued to the lower hull assembly. The PE grille plate is then folded and rolled to shape and fitted to the rear bulkhead, which in turn is fitted to the rear of the hull. Two engine hatches are attached, followed by the three piece slide panel, (unditching panel), that is fitted to the rear which is in turn fitted with a stowage plate. Then it’s on with the tracks, which probably are best made up into link and length style to get the sit/sag right. Decals The small decal sheet contains just two red stars for each side of the turret. It’s also very simple to paint as it comes in only one colour, Russian green Conclusion Hobbyboss have been releasing some really obscure vehicles from between the wars/early WWII Russian vehicles and they should be commended for it, at least there is a little more information on this vehicle than there si for others I have reviewed. It is certainly a rather odd looking little tank will make an interesting addition to any modellers collection. Review sample courtesy of
  24. Hi, all Let me to present my first building in the new year - test build new set of MiniArt - tank T-54-2 (model 1949) The model will go on sale soon. [/url] I started with the assembly of the engine I also gathered the bottom and running gear of the machine more progress: driver's seat hull assembly continued I also collected fuel tanks and containers
  25. Hi All, I've been itching for this GB to start! I picked this up for less than a score online recently, complete with a Verlinden set However, I'm in two minds about using the resin so I have ordered a metal barrel from Poland. For info, the final build will have minimal Czech markings. Roll on Saturday!!! The decals that came with the kit are damaged so I purchased some new ones. I've noticed they are not 'handed' so I'll place the Czech markings on the front and left side of the turret when the time comes. This aftermarket kit was part of the package but I'm debating whether to use it or sell it on Picyure of metal barrel to follow once it arrives
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