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Found 471 results

  1. Boulton Paul Defiant Trumpeter 1:48 History The Boulton Paul Defiant was designed in response to Air Ministry Specification F9/35 of 26 June 1935 calling for a two-seat fighter with all its armament concentrated in a turret. It was believed at the time that, in avoiding an enemy aircraft’s slipstream, fire from a powered turret would be more accurate than that provided by fixed forward firing guns. Five companies responded to the specification but, for various reasons, four withdrew leaving Boulton Paul the sole contender. Designed by John Dudley North, the P82 prototype (minus turret) first flew on 11 Dec 1937 at which point it was named the Defiant. A second prototype was fitted with a Type A four-gun turret based on a French design already licensed for use on Boulton Paul’s Overstrand bomber, and this version with but minor changes became the production Defiant Mk1. The turret was electro-hydraulically operated with a mechanical backup and carried 4 x .303 Browning machine guns, electrically fired with cut-off points in the turret ring preventing activation when pointing at the propeller disc or tailplane. Whilst the gunner could lock the turret forward and transfer firing control to the pilot, this was rarely practised given forward elevation restrictions and the lack of pilot gunsight. The Defiant entered RAF service with No 264 Squadron in December 1939 and saw combat for the first time in May 1940 during the evacuation of Dunkirk. It was initially successful with Luftwaffe fighters sustaining losses, but a change of enemy tactics with attacks from below or head on soon saw Defiants forfeit the initiative. Following the loss by 264 Squadron of 7 aircraft with 9 crewmen dead over the three days 26th to 28th August 1940, the Defiant was withdrawn from the day fighter role. Four squadrons were equipped with the aircraft for night fighter duties, however, and it is apposite that during the “Blitz” of 1940-41 the Defiant destroyed more enemy bombers than any other type. It was finally retired from the front line in 1942 and thereafter used for training, target-towing, ECM and air sea rescue – many aircraft having had their turrets removed. The “Daffy”, as the Defiant was affectionately known, also saw service with the Royal Navy and the air forces of Australia, Canada and Poland. The Model We hadn’t had a Defiant in 1:48 at all, then within a year we have two. Unfortunately Trumpeter seem to have snatched defeat from the jaws of victory again with some sloppy research. This is particularly noticeable on the fuselage. The nose appears to be the wrong shape, being too deep and not long enough. The shape of the rear fuselage is no better, being too deep and also missing the kink on the lower fuselage between just aft of the turret and the tail. I'm not really sure of the right nomenclature, should it be F1, or Mk.1. The detail is nicely restrained, but many of the panel lines are spurious at best, many being moulded complete with two lines of rivets where the real aircraft only has a single line of rivets and no panel line. Having said all that, the moulding is very nice and, apparently, according to some build reviews it is easy to build and look nice, if wrong, on the shelf. Not having the Airfix kit, means I cannot do a direct comparison, but I get the feeling that the Airfix one is more accurate, if a little lacking in surface detail. So, on with the build, beginning with the cockpit, naturally; this is built up from the floor, seat, rudder bar, joystick, the two sidewalls and instrument panel with decal instruments. The cockpit assembly is then glued into one half of the fuselage while a small switchbox is fitted to the starboard side. The fuselage is then closed up, with the two piece tailwheel sandwiched between. The clear parts of the section between the cockpit and turret and then added from the outside. The wing is comprised of a single piece lower section complete with wheel wells and two upper sections, once assembled this is glued to the fuselage. Each main undercarriage assembly is made up from the single piece wheel, undercarriage leg and outer bay door. Once glued in place the retraction actuator is then attached along with the inner bay door. The individual exhaust stubs are then attached; three per side, as well as the landing light covers, navigation light covers and separate ailerons. The propeller is a single piece item, with separate spinner and backplate whilst the radiator bath is a two piece affair whilst the oil cooler is a single piece item. The lower outer bay doors are then glued into position along with the optionally posed flaps, as is the separate rudder, main and rear mounted aerial masts. The turret is very well detailed, made up of seventeen plastic and two brass parts. The four gun barrels are hollowed out at the muzzle, giving them a nice appearance. With the turret assembled it can be inserted into its aperture. Unfortunately, the turtle deck, aft of the turret is fixed, and there si no option to have it retracted, without further surgery. The build is finished off with the fitting of the windscreen and canopy, which cannot be posed open without some surgery, the two horizontal tailplanes and finally the pitot probe. Decals The decal sheet provided markings for two aircraft and are designed and printed by Trumpeter themselves. The decals are sharp, in good register, nicely opaque and with minimal carrier film, except around the letters of the main identification letters. The aircraft markings are for the following:- Defiant F1 L7009 TW-H in a day fighter scheme of dark green, dark brown over light aircraft grey. Defiant F1 N3328 DZ-Z in a night fighter scheme of overall black. Conclusion This looks to be quite a nice to build and will no doubt look stunning in an experts hands if they can get over the kits inaccuracies. It would certainly be a good kit for a novice modeller too as it’s not too taxing, although they may need a little help with the turret. Just a shame that Trumpeter failed to get the shape right as it could have been a great kit. Review sample courtesy of UK Distributors for
  2. P-40 from Trumpeter. I made few corrections and added things to cockpit and engine. Tail wheel bay is bulit from scratch. Decals (mainly) are from Techmod and gun barrels and pitot tube are from Master. Unfortunately i broke pitot tube ending. WIP thread was on LSP: http://forum.largescaleplanes.com/index.php?showtopic=69082 I forgot about gunsight, so i did one photo with it. It is on the end of this post.
  3. Don't smile, Trumpeter is to release a 1/48th Boulton Paul Defiant Mk.1 in 2016-2017 - ref.02899 Source: http://scalemodels.ru/modules/news/img_9587_1449141028_16.jpg.html V.P.
  4. After the MiG-23BN "Flogger-H" (http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234973404-148-mig-23bn-flogger-h-by-trumpeter-released/) Trumpeter is to release in late March 2016 a 1/48th MiG-27 "Flogger-D" - ref.05802. Source: http://www.trumpeter.cn/index.php?g=home&m=article&a=show&id=67&l=en Box art V.P.
  5. Dear fellow Britmodellers, may I present my very first Trumpeter aircraft kit! I was pleasantly surprised by its good engineering and fit. Since I'm no expert on the 'Wimpy' I can not comment about scale accuracy; however, it does look like a Wellington to my eyes! The only letdown of the kit are the decals, their colors are totally off. The code letters and serial were replaced by (very old, but still usable) decals from the Matchbox kit. Wing roundels and fin flash from (almost equally old) Techmod decals. Painted with Gunze acrylics, representing a machine of RAF 150.Squadron, operating from Regina airbase in Italy, autumn 1944. The Trumpeter kit offers a bomb bay with basic details and a cover, but no individual doors. Since I wanted to display the bomb bay open, I purchased a CMK resin set, designed for the MPM kit. This does not fit the Trumpeter kit, being considerably shorter. In the end, I only used the resin doors, some of which were badly warped. I tried to straighten them out with heat, but it only worked to a certain degree. Wheels are resin items from Aires/Quickboost. The bomb load was assembled from 250lb resin bombs by CMK. Photographs by Wolfgang Rabel of IGM Cars & Bikes. Thanks for your interest, all comments are welcome. Greetings from Vienna!
  6. Hello, I`ve managed to take pics of the project I`ve been working on for quite some time. I`ve stopped cause I decided to build the new CSM`s kits - F.K.8. The Lim-2 was a Polish Licensed built MiG 15 bis. I always wanted to have a decent looking kit of the Polish Lim 2 sitting on my shelf since I had been looking at one during 8 classes of my primary school (named after the 1st Fighter Regiment "Warszawa" (Warsaw) as you can see in the picture below: Source: http://www.epktspotters.org - For discussion purposes only Unfortunately, it has been repainted some time ago in an inaccurate manner - the tactical number should be red etc. I was also lucky to find a picture of that plane during the time of its service in 38th Fighter Regiment located in Powidz: When it comes to the kit I use the Part set for MiG 15 Bis and Bill Model decals and Alclad paints.
  7. Russian Su-34 Fullback Fighter-Bomber 1:72 Trumpeter The Sukhoi Su-34, known by the NATO reporting name 'Fullback' is an all-weather strike fighter, designed to replace the ageing Su-24 Fencer in Russian service. Despite being based on an existing design (the Su-27), the type endured an extremely protracted development, punctuated by the collapse of the Soviet Union. Eventually, 200 of the type are expected to enter service, replacing approximately 300 Su-24s. There are many differences between the Su-27 and the Su34, principal amongst which is a completely new nose, which accomodates the crew side-by-side. Since September 2015, Su-34s have been involved in the conflict in Syria, dropping BETAB-500 and OFAB-500 bombs. There has already been interest in the type from overseas customers. Algeria has ordered an initial batch of 12 aircraft, while Vietnam is apparently also interested in the type. This kit represents another high-profile release from the Trumpeter stable. Following hot on the heels of their gorwing range of Su-27 variants, as well as the 1:48 Su-34 from Hobbyboss, the kit has been fairly warmly received by fans of modern Russian hardware, save from the fairly well known issue with the shape of the nose. The kit arrives in a fairly large box, inside which are a fairly staggering 550 parts spread across 34 sprues of grey plastic (not including the upper and lower fuselage/wing parts, which are not on a sprue) and a single clear sprue. You have to hand it to Trumpeter, they know how to cram a lot of plastic into a box! The parts are well protected and the quality of moulding is up to the usual Trumpeter standard, with fine, consistent panel lines and plenty of detail. The overall shape and arrangement of parts appears to match photographs and plans of the real aircraft well, with the only exception being the shape of the nose. Some modellers have commented that this could be improved with a little work with a sanding stick, but I'm not so sure. No doubt someone will pop up with a resin replacement before too long, however. Construction begins with the cockpit. This is made up of sixteen parts, including two crisply moulded K36 ejection seats. The cockpit is well detailed and includes a door in the rear bulkhead which leads to the nose gear bay and crew access point. The nose gear bay itself is made up of seven parts and is just as well detailed as the cockpit. Both sub-assemblies fit into the lower fuselage, while the parts for the main landing gear bay fit into the upper fuselage. With this done the upper and lowe fusealge halves can be joined. As with most kits of blended-wing aircraft, the fuselage is split vertically with the entire wing moulded in place. The fences for the outer wing are all present and correct. The canards, vertical tail and tail boom are next. The rudders are moulded seperately, but can't be posed off centre as they have large tabs that lock them into place. The upper tail boom is moulded seperately and there is a cutout for the APU vent. The wing flaps and elevators are next, along with the multi-part engine exhausts. These are well detailed and slot into the fuselage up to their real depth. Next up is the rugged landing gear. Each main gear leg is moulded from five parts, with the uppermost part of the main leg seperate from the rest of the leg. I have to say that the structural strength of this breakdown concerns me a little. The complex nose gear leg is made up of seven parts, with an optional crew access ladder. The engine air intakes are next. These are partly slide moulded, which makes construction relatively pain free. Engine turbine faces are included, which will prevent the dreaded see-through effect. As the build draws to a conclusion, the pylons have to be added. The canopy is nicely realised and very cleanly moulded. This kit famously includes a quite frankly ludicrous amount of weaponry. This probably accounts for at least a third of the asking price, but who doesn't like spare ordnance? All told, you get: 2 x KH-31 Krypton air-to-surface missiles; 2 x KH-58 Kilter anti-radiation missiles; 2 x KH-59 Ovod cruise missiles; 2 x KMGU-2 munitions dispenser; 12 x FAB-100 bombs; 2 x KAB-500L bombs; 2 x KAB-1500L bombs; 2 x KAB-1500T bombs; 2 x R-27T infrared homing air-to-air missiles; 2 x R-27R semi-active radar homing air-to-air missiles; 2 x R-27ET extended range infrared homing air-to-air missiles; 2 x R-27ER extended range semi-active radar homing air-to-air missiles; 2 x R-73E infrared homing air-to-air missiles; 2 x R-77 active radar homing air-to-air missiles; 2 x R-172 'AWACS killer' air-to-air missiles; 2 x PTB-3000 drop tanks; and 2 x APK-9 data link pods. Decal options are provided for two Russian Air Force Su-34s, one in the blue/blue/green disruptive pattern and the other in the much less pleasing dark grey over blue finish that the aircraft operating in Syria wore. Decals are also included for the pile of ordnance. The decals look nicely printed and should perform well. Conclusion This is an interesting kit which will probably divide opinion. It's big, complex, well detailed and includes a very generous selection of ordnance. On the other hand, it's not that cheap and it has a wonky nose. Whether you decide to take the plunge will depend very much on whether you think the kit represents value for money, as well as how much you care about the nose (or how much time or money you are willing to spend fixing it). Whichever route you choose, you will be rewarded with an impressive kit. Now let's hope some more foreign governments splash out on the real thing so we can have some more impressive marking options. Review sample courtesy of UK Distributors for
  8. This is just a placeholder until I've finished the F-111F over in the F-111 GB: I hope you'll wait for me! Cheers Hans J
  9. 1/16 Jagdtiger

    Bit the bullet and got one of these, don't know where it's going as it won't fit my display cases. I taped the hull parts together just to see how big it is and it's big. That's a 1/35 King Tiger sitting beside and on top just for a sense of scale. The wheels and track are just sitting as I haven't fitted any torsion bars or anything yet. They give you inside armor plates for the upper and lower hull to represent the real thickness which makes the sidewalls almost 1/4" thick and this thing gets real heavy pretty quickly. I will do the interior basically OOTB as I'm not trying any super detailing and will spend my efforts on trying to make the exterior presentable. This may be too much model for my skill set. Lloyd
  10. The long expected 1/48th fighter-bomber variants from the "Flogger" are in the 2015/2016 Trumpeter programme - ref.05801 - MiG-23BN "Flogger-H" - ref.05802 - MiG-27 "Flogger-D" - http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234996487-148-mig-27-flogger-d-by-trumpeter-released-nose-correction-set-in-design-by-cold-war-studio/ - ref.05803 - MiG-27M "Flogger-J" - http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235004894-148-mig-27m-flogger-j-new-variant-by-trumpeter-released/ Source: https://www.facebook.com/ScaleModels.ru/photos/a.632237406802735.1073741827.129310540428760/1008947572465048/?type=1&theater Next variant should be the MiG-27K "Flogger-J2" (ref.05804?). To be followed. MiG-27 pictures: http://www.16va.be/galeries_vvs/mig-27/imgcol/index.html V.P.
  11. IS-7 Iraqi Stalin Seven

    Too big and heavy for the narrow roads and weak bridges of Europe, the behemoth IS-7s found a natural habitat in the desert.....
  12. MiG-27 vs. MiG-23BN nose?

    Hi all, Cold War Studio don't seem to be in a hurry to release a nose for the mig-27 and their BN nose is the only game in town so far. So... In terms of general shape, could the bn nose be used to make a 27? I know probes etc. are different but I wondered whether one might be steeper or longer or whatever. Thank you for replying!
  13. Trumpeter MiG-3 with Part set, resin exhausts and Montex masks. Inscription on the side means "For the motherland". Nice kit with, surprisingly, no major errors. I improved few things like a propeller blades - awfully thick in the kit. As a support for photos I used old cigarette case from Soviet Union when Saint Petersburg was a Leningrad. For Poland where I live, it was a dark and hard time. May it never come back.
  14. Russian Su-33 Flanker D (with carrier deck) 1:72 Trumpeter Instantly recognisable to enthusiasts of Cold War or modern jet aircraft, the Su-27 Flanker has formed the backbone of the Russian Air Force's air superiority fighter force for much of the last thirty years. The design marked a departure from previous Soviet/Russian aircraft, with its podded engines, large wing and sophisticated avionics (it was the first fly-by-wire aircraft to enter service in the Soviet Union). Emerging in prototype form as the T-10 in 1977, the design showed great promise, and before long it had beaten the time-to-height records set by the modified Streak Eagle in 1975. Although originally designed as a long-range air superiority fighter, like many of its contemporaries the Su-27 has been developed to take on a variety of roles, including air-to-surface missions. The multirole Sukhoi Su-33 Flanker D is the navalised variant of the successful all-weather interceptor. Around 35 examples of the type have been constructed for Russian Naval Aviation, all of which operate from the Aircraft carrier ‘Admiral Kuznestov’. The Su-33 differs from the Su-27 in a number of respects. Most noticeable are the canards, situated forward of the wing to provide additional lift and manoeuvrability. The Su-33 also features larger wings with a powered folding mechanism, folding horizontal stabilisers, in-flight refuelling capability and the ability to carry a range of air-to-surface weapons. Despite the relatively small number of aircraft produced, this is the latest in a steady trickle of kits of the Su-33 to emerge. Things got off to a less-than-promising start, with the old and not very accurate Italeri Su-27 Sea Flanker (re-boxed by Zvezda). A few years ago Hasegawa gave us a much more sophisticated kit which, while still not perfect, was very good indeed. Trumpeter released an all-new kit along with a typically generous selection of ordnance a few years agp, just before Zveda added their own kit. At this rate it won't be long before we can build every one of the 35 aircraft with a different kit! Anyway, Trumpeter's kit is back once again, but with a slight twist this time. Inside the large top-opening box are over 300 parts spread across around twenty sprues of grey plastic and a single clear sprue. In typical Trumpeter style, the plastic parts are exquisitely moulded, with engraved panel lines, rivet and fastener detail. Also in the box is a small fret of photo etched parts, two decal sheets (one for markings and one for stencils) and a colour painting diagram as well as instructions. In common with other Trumpeter kits, the parts are extremely well packed and all of the sprues are individually bagged. Certain parts, such as the clear sprue are wrapped in foam for extra protection. This version of the kit differs from the last one we received for review as it contains extra parts for a large section of carrier deck, complete with hydraulic jet blast deflector, crew and a few extra optional parts for the aircraft itself. Trumpeter don't appear to have trumpeted (ha ha) this fact, however, as it doesn't appear to be mentioned on the box artwork. Nothing has changed since we reviewed the last iteration of this kit, so it's still the case that the overall shape and arrangement of parts appears to match photographs and plans of the real thing very well. The canopy has the correct profile, which means a seam down the middle, but this is a five minute job to clean up with the right tools. Trumpeter have even included the option to build the model with the wings and horizontal tails folded, which is very pleasing to see and exactly how I intend to finish mine. Construction begins with the cockpit. This is made up of five parts, including a crisply moulded K36 ejection seat, which slots into a cockpit tub adorned with convincing moulded details (although decals re also provided). Once completed, the whole sub-assembly fits inside the fuselage halves. As with most kits of blended-wing aircraft, the fuselage is split vertically with the inner section of wing moulded in place. The outer sections of the wings are moulded separately so that the model can be built with the wings folded. Some modellers will find this a pain as it creates an extra joint to deal with, but as I mentioned before, I think it's great that Trumpeter included this option because it wasn't possible to finish the Hasegawa kit like this without major surgery. Do note, however, that you must drill a number of holes in order to fit the appropriate pylons to the outer wing sections before your cement the parts together. There are different parts to use for each option, as the outer flaps are dropped when the wings are folded. The same applies to the horizontal tail surfaces, with different versions provided for folded and unfolded options. In this boxing there is an additional sprue with extra parts for the drooped flaps which wasn't included with the original kit. The engine air intakes are next. These are slide moulded, which makes construction relatively pain free. Engine turbine faces are included, which will prevent the dreaded see-through effect, and parts such as the auxiliary air intake louvers are moulded separately in order to maximise the level of detail. The Su-33's rugged landing gear is next. Each main gear leg is moulded as a single part, which should translate into a degree of structural strength, while the more complex nose gear leg is made up of seven parts. In both cases the wheels are moulded separately. While the model is on its back, you have to add the Su-33's beefy tail hook – a nicely detailed part is made up of four parts. The pylons have to be added at this stage too, so make sure you drill out the appropriate holes at the start of the build, or this is the point at which you'll really regret it. The canopy is nicely realised and, as mentioned above, accurate in profile. Because of the shape of the canopy and the way it has had to be moulded, there is a little distortion around the sides, but by way of compensation it can be finished in either open or closed positions. The major difference between this version of the kit and the previous version is the inclusion of a section of carrier deck, complete with jet blast deflector, decals and crew. The carrier deck is a hell of a slab of plastic, and will look very impressive with the aircraft and crew positioned in place. I think the Olymp 10 ton deck tractor will be a virtually mandatory purchase with this kit! In typical Trumpeter style, a very extensive range of ordnance is included. Of course there is so much that you can't possibly use it all, but who doesn't like spare ordnance? All told, you get: 4 x KH-31 Krypton air-to-surface missiles; 4 x KH-35 Zvezda anti-ship missiles; 4 x KH-59M Ovod cruise missiles; 2 x B-8M rocket pods; 1 x APK-9 data link pod (for use with the KH-59 missiles); 2 x R-77 active radar homing air-to-air missiles; 4 x R-27ET extended range infrared homing air-to-air missiles; 4 x R-27ER extended range semi-active radar homing air-to-air missiles; 2 x R-73 infrared homing air-to-air missiles; No, it doesn't fit inside my photo tent... Nothing has changed when it comes to the decal sheet, so you still have a choice of two schemes - Su-33 Flanker D 'Red 67' and Su-33 Flanker D 'Red 80', both of the Russian Navy. The decal sheets are nicely printed and you get a full set of stencils too, which is a bonus. Conclusion Trumpeter are definitely on a role with their 1:72 aircraft, having given us fans of Soviet/Russian aircraft a hat-trick of very decent kits in the shape of the MiG-29, Su-24 and now the Su-33. This is a very decent representation of an interesting variant of an important aircraft. The basic shape of the aircraft looks to be about spot on and, with the option to fold the wings, it has much to recommend it, even when compared to the Hasegawa kit. The inclusion of the deck section is a worthwhile addition too. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of UK Distributors for
  15. The Trumpeter kit finished as the shabby HE+V from the well know photo, mostly OOB with just the radio mast moved to match the position on the original aircraft, and the bomb racks omitted as they don't appear on the photo. This was mainly a trouble free build as I didn't try to correct the kit's well publicised errors or add anything extra - if you like that kind of thing check out Sprueloose's WIP - the main issue came when I tried out the Alclad Klear Cote Gloss. For whatever reason, this never dried and was still tacky well over a week later, I had to go over it with some standard Windsor & Newton just so I could handle it, but by then it was too late, there was a lot of dust stuck to it. The Henschel HS129 that I built in tandem also suffered this, so this is one bottle that will be going to the back of the shelf; the search for a really good gloss varnish continues. Chipping was done using the Vallejo chipping fluid, the real aircraft was even worse, lets say this represents it a couple of weeks before that photo was taken... If some of the markings looked painted on that is because they are! First time I have done this, and the Montex set proved pretty easy for squadron codes and serial number, the roundels and fin flashes are decals though from the excellent Xtradecal sets
  16. My last build was of a pair of 1/72 Jagdpanzer E-25 tanks, for my next I'm staying with the Entwicklung Paper Panzers but I'm moving up to 1/35 scale with Trumpeter's Jagdpanzer E-10. I'm also venturing into the world of scratch building with a what-if Aufklärungspanzer E-10. For more information about Trumpeter's Jagdpanzer E-10 you can find a review on Armorama here. As for the Aufklärungspanzer E-10 I'll be using another Trumpeter Jagdpanzer E-10 kit as a base but replacing the hull mounted gun with a new scratch built upper hull and turret in a similar layout as the diagram below. I started with the Jagdpanzer E-10 which will mainly be made OOB with the addition of Trumpeter's workable tracks and a RB Models metal barrel. There are several builds of this tank on this forum already so I wont bother going step by step, but mainly because it went together really fast & I forgot to take pictures The top went together rather quickly, only a few hatches a grills to add. I replaced the plastic grab handles with some metal wire, which I took half a day rummaging through the garage trying to find something suitable. I replaced the plastic tow cables with some electrical wire that was first striped out of its insulation. Then I attached one end to a clamp & the other to a drill, the drill was then used to twist the wire together. New fasteners where then (badly) made from scrap PE. This is my first time building workable tracks and it seams a bit overkill on this kit considering it comes with four different sets of tracks in the box (early/late wrap-around & individual link). I enjoyed making them once I got into a groove & even though they are more complex then the tracks that come with the kit I feel they will be a lot easier to use in the long run. Both tracks are done but I had a slight disaster when I knocked over and spilt my brand new Tamiya thin glue that I got specificity for making these tracks, luckily I didn't get any on the model but it ate the markings off my cutting board >.<
  17. We all know the sad history of HMS Barham and the film of her end.So went back to happy times and the model that Trumpeter produce of Barham 1941 is very close to 1937 version.Only have to take off the two 0.5 inch machine guns on B turret,add neutral stripes and the High angle control system without any radar on the fighting top.I also have HMS Valiant as 1945 Pacific colours and HMS Queen Elizabeth as 1918 waiting next on the slip way after Barham.
  18. 1/350 Prinz Eugen range finders

    Hi I'm backdating my Trumpeter 1/350 Prinz Eugen to 1941 fit and I understand the range finders in the forward Cupola's were exposed as were the smaller one's just forward and below them on the small platforms off the bridge. I don't know if this is somewhere else on BM, so I apologize if it is, but does anyone know of any aftermarket pieces to use as the range finders? I am loathe to buy a Bismarck kit just to strip the 4 pieces from it. Alternatively if anyone has any decent drawings and would like to share the information with me, I would be able to model them up in CAD and put them on Shapeways so people can have something to use when back dating their Prinz.
  19. HMCS Huron

    Well calling this all done just added the rigging and a couple of signal flags made from tape I had this at the Scot Nat,s in Perth but only just got round to getting some photos took of the finished build Beefy
  20. I am currently building the Airfix 1:350 kit HMS Illustrious and have both Airfix and Trumpeter 1:350 Merlin HM.1 helicopters for this. I've noticed that there is a 10mm difference in fuselage length between the Airfix and Trumpeter kits, so I went online and searched for the correct fuselage length. This is where it gets confusing for me, in that Wikipedia says the fuselage length is 64.1 ft/19.53m (the Airfix version fits this at 55.8mm); however, the Leonardo site states the length is 74.9 ft/22.81m (the Trumpeter version fits this at 65.5mm). Can anyone here please confirm the correct fuselage length for this helo? A difference of 10mm at 1:350 scale is quite noticeable. Mike
  21. Kit - Trumpeter 1:48. Paint - Alclad lacquers, AK Xtreme Metals, Xtracolour & Humbrol enamels. Decals - Microscale & Superscale. Extras - Hasegawa 750lb'ers, Quickboost resin seat, Eduard pre-painted etch. NA F-100D Super Sabre 'Pahodee Tiger' 308th TFS, 31st TFW Bien Hoa AFB Mid 1965. Here’s my just completed Trumpeter 1:48 ‘Hun’. What a kit !!, simply fell together with almost no input from me. Only additions are a Quickboost seat and Eduard pre-painted etch set for the pit – neither of which are actually ‘needed’, simply a concession to middle-aged sausage fingers !! Not too much to say about the actual machine except that it is said to be assigned to Don Kilgus’ wingman in mid-1965, and despite my (and others) best efforts, just cannot find the name of the pilot. If the scheme is familiar, it may be because way back in the very late 1970’s Esci featured it for their (quite awful) 1:48 kit as the box-art. For my model, I’ve used an ancient MicroScale sheet for all the stencilling and a more recent SuperScale sheet for the aircraft specific markings. Overall aluminium paint is Xtracolour enamel, the heat-scorched NMF area around the engine is a combination of Alclad lacquers, AK Xtreme Metals and Tamiya clear blue & orange. Thouroughly enjoyed every minute of this one. Thanks for taking the time to look and/or comment. Next, a BoB Hurricane or AVG P-40. AFN Ian.
  22. Soviet PL-37 Light Artillery Wagon Trumpeter 1:35 History There is very little in the way of history that I can find on the PL-37, whether in my library or on the interweb. What is known is that the first Russian armoured train was built around 1915 with a number being captured after the revolution. The Soviets built up a fleet of armoured trains in the interwar years, used mostly by the Red Army, but the NKVD also used them in conjunction with their armoured cruisers. In the 1930’s this fleet was modernised with the introduction of the PR-35 and PL-37 wagons. Each train consisted of one BR-35 armoured engine, one PR-35 and two PL-37 wagons. During Operation Barbarossa, the Germans captured or destroyed most of these trains, usually through bombing as they were particularly vulnerable of this. During the war more heavily armoured trains and cruisers were built, with around 70 being available in 1945. The Model The kit comes in quite a large top opening box with an artistic impression of the wagon, strangely on its own without the rest of the train it should be attached to, firing its cannon at the enemy. As with the Panzertriebwagen No.16, reviewed HERE on opening the modeller is confronted with a box full of medium grey styrene, ten sprues in total, along with separate hull, in its own protective box, floor, turrets and five rail ballast sections. All the parts are beautifully moulded, particularly the single piece hull of the wagon, with no sign of flash and only a few moulding pips, so cleaning up after removal from the sprues should be a bit of a doddle. Being a fair bit smaller than the Panzertriebwagen there are far fewer steps in the construction, which begins with the construction of the rail tracks. The three sections that make up the majority of the track are joined together and fitted with the two end pieces, one of which needs to be modified to fit. The sleeper sections are then fitted from beneath, again with one section requiring modification to fit. The rails are then slid through the ties and joined together with two fishplates per rail. The wagon construction begins with the floor, the underside of which is fitted out with two longitudinal strengthening beams and two cross beams, on at each end. Toe plates, with added swivels are then attached to the underside in preparation for fitting the two bogies. Inside the main box structure there are four machine gun positions fitted. Each of these consists of the gun muzzle with the ball glued to the rear end. The ball is then placed in the socket of the mounting plate and covered with a semi-circular backing, allowing the muzzle to move. Each completed mounting plate is the glued into position, this is the limit of what’s in the interior. With the machine guns fitted, the floor assembly can be joined to the hull, along with the four two part buffers, two at each end. Each of the two bogies is built up from two side frames to which the two axle boxes are attached along with the parts that represent the spring suspension. Each axle is fitted with two wheels, with two axles sandwiched between the side frames, along with the bogie pivot block, which has been fitted with the four, three piece, brake shoes. The completed assemblies are then attached to the pivot mounts previously fitted to the underside of the wagon floor. The buffer plates are then attached, along with the ID plate to each end, whilst the wagon sides are fitted with the various hand rails and the access door. With the wagon the right side up, more hand and foot rails are fitted to the ends of the car, along with the five piece couplings and air line. On the side with the access door, three steps are added beneath the door and two long hand rails either side. The observation tower is made up of the single piece tower, to which the two top mounted hatches are fitted, along with the periscope cover, with the six viewing ports attached, one per side of the hexagon shaped tower. The completed tower is then fitted to the hole in the centre of the wagon roof. The two turrets are identical and consist of the single piece turret, a machine gun mount similar to those fitted to the wagon sides, a five piece main gun, made up of a two piece front barrel section, single piece rear barrel section, recuperator, and a figure of eight shaped joining piece. The machine gun, and main gun are fitted to the inside of the turret, before the turret base is attached. On the outside the turret is fitted with aiming port, periscope port, hatch hinge and an under-barrel plate. The hatch is then fitted with the other end of the hinge before being fitted into position, followed by a hinged mantlet plate, complete with two hinges. This can be posed closed up for low elevations or open for high. There are two protective plates fitted to each side of the barrel and these are attached along with the roof mounted radio aerial. Lastly the turret mounted rear hatch doors are fitted along with their hinges. The two completed turret assemblies are then fitted slotted into position and the railcar is completed with the addition of two armoured plates fitted either side of the couplings, each plate having previously been fitted with two hinges. The completed model can then be placed on the rail tracks. For improvements to the tracks, such as the rails, ties and ballast see the link in the Panzertriebwagen review. Conclusion I’m really loving the releases of these rail wagons. Having got all the German armoured train components, it’ll be great if Trumpeter continues with further releases of the Soviet trains. The build of this one isn’t at all complicated and would be a good first build or anyone interested in these trains, or those wanting something unusual in their collection. The camouflage possibilities are endless, with a fair few photos on the web showing how each individual unit painted their wagons differently. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of UK Distributors for
  23. Some test shots parts from the future Trumpeter 1/48th Douglas A3D-2 Skywarrior kit (ref 02868) were presented at the USA IPMS Nats 2012 at Orlando. Appear (too) briefly in this video between 3:36 & 3:39 Hope to see soon some pics of this kit that is supposed to be out in late 2012 or early 2013. Source: Source: http://scalemodels.ru/images/2011/12/1324713102_14.jpg'>http://scalemodels.r...24713102_14.jpg V.P.
  24. EA-3B Skywarrior 1:48

    EA-3B Skywarrior 1:48 Trumpeter The Skywarrior was originally designed as a US Naval Strategic Bomber, but like the Vigilante that replaced it, it was re-tasked when the roles for delivery of bombs (especially nuclear) was handed over to the ballistic missiles of the growing submarine fleet. It was developed from an early concept of a jet bomber, and although it had trouble with its engines, it first flew in the early 50s. Even after entry into service it was dogged with problems, one of which was the decision not to fit ejection seats to save weight, which resulted in the wry comment that A3D stood for "all three dead". Once it switched to the Electronic Warfare role, it found its niche and continued in that area until the end of the first Gulf War. The EA aircraft were fitted with pressurised compartments in one of the former weapons bays, and the EA-3B carried four addition crew in this area along with a host of electronic sensors for defensive and offensive operations. The Kit This is the fourth kit from Trumpeter using the same basic airframe, and it has been established that the landing gear bay lacks a see-through area that should be present, although from looking at it back when the first edition was released, it doesn't seem too difficult to fix with a bit of styrene and modelling skill. The box it arrives in is quite large, which stems from the size of this venerable bomber. It had a long, slab-sided fuselage that earned it the nickname "the Whale", and its large swept wings take up some room, although the wings do fold, so are supplied in sections. Inside the box is a small partition that protects the two sprues of clear parts, two small sprues in grey styrene, and two sheets of Photo-Etch (PE) brass. There is also a separate bag containing three flexible styrene wheels that may cause some wrinkling of noses amongst those that don't like "rubber" tyres. The rest of the box is taken up with ten large sprues and the two monstrous fuselage halves, all in the same mid-grey styrene. A quick perusal of the instructions show a fairly standard construction, although it would seem that Trumpeter have decided not to depict the compartment (coal-hole?) where the four additional crew spent their time staring at racks of instruments while flying sideways. That's pretty understandable actually, as given the secret nature of most of the equipment on board, not many photos of the area exist apart from one I found on the A-3 Skywarrior Association's page here. Although the box states it's an EA-3B, the two decal options are stated as A3D-2s, and if you look at the profiles of the EA3-B, you will notice some differences are apparent. The large bulged tail top sensor suite is missing entirely (but it is included as an option in the previous A3D-2 boxing 02868 along with the pointed radome and stinger tail), although the nose radome is of the correct flat ended shape. There are also windows missing for the EA-3B, a towel-rail antenna on the starboard side, an optional belly pod and a bulge on the nose that is sometimes carried on airframes with the pointed radome. Additionally, some A3D-2s still carried the 20mm stinger tail turrets, although admittedly these were only the early ones before it was dropped. There have been comments about the decal options not being appropriate too, but I can only come up with a discrepancy in the more colourful VAH-10 Vikings scheme, which may be fictional. Setting aside those concerns, which may or may not bother you depending on your modelling outlook, let's have a look at the kit. The cockpit is where the build starts with three seats that are built from two halves each, which will leave an annoying seam within the back frame to deal with. The seat pad covers the rest of the join, and a pair of seatbelts is added to each one. The side consoles, main panel and rear instrument bulkhead are then built onto a floor panel that has a few visible ejector pin marks that will need sanding or filling, depending on whether they will be seen. The side consoles have PE inserts for the instruments, and the main panel has been moulded in clear for no apparent reason, as it is painted black and has a white instrument face decal added to the front. Maybe they ran out of space on the grey sprues? The rear crew member sits facing backwards behind the pilot, and has a rack of equipment to play with while he watches where they've been. The radar is constructed from a good number of parts before being salted away out of sight in the radome, and the nose gear bay is built up from panels to form a sloping box shape that holds the leg, retraction jack and the single nose wheel in a Y-shaped yoke, which flexes to insert the two-part wheel hub and the rubbery wheel. The main gear legs are also built up at this point, with L-shaped legs, separate oleo-scissors, and complex hubs made up from two styrene parts and another two PE parts for the outer hub. The bomb bay is also built up from panels, and has some nice ribbing detail included, with a high part count. The main gear bays are located in the rear of the fuselage, and are built up side-by-side with plenty of detail, after which they are sandwiched between a bulkhead at the front, and an insert in the rear that makes them into a single assembly. A short crawl way between the cockpit and bomb bay is again built from panels, and this is first joined to the head of the bomb bay, then to the bottom of the cockpit. The nose gear bay is added to the front of this crawl way, and the whole lot is glued into the fuselage side along with the main gear bay, arrestor hook bay and some inserts in the air-brake bay. You can now close up the fuselage finally, and what a seam that will be! Fit seems good, although it's always difficult to say for certain without the "innards" installed, which sometimes actually improve fit due to the increased rigidity of the parts. The nose cone is added (with no means of displaying it open mentioned), and the two-part tail cone fairing takes it to its full length of almost 50cm. A refuelling probe and its pipework sprouts from under the wing root, and is stabilised against the curve of the nose by a small bracket, and the large crystal clear canopy is then added over a one-piece coaming, after which the fuselage is flipped to add all the doors to the gear bays and bomb bay, plus the tail bumper and arrestor hook. The bomb bay doors have PE skins for a 3D look, but there is no documented way of posing them closed, and there is a crew doorway on the underside behind the nose gear that could be lowered with a little ingenuity. After adding the main gear legs the fuselage can then be stood on its own legs for the first time. Construction moves to the wings, which are fairly complex as they go. The inner wing is built up with a few small parts in the tip for the wing-fold mechanism. Six spacers are added in the slat bays, after which the slats are added, plus the engine pylons, flap guides and the flaps themselves. A number of PE parts are added to the wing-fold area to give it additional detail, and the inner wings are then slotted into their mating points, where care will be needed to ensure the correct angle and that the edges line-up with the wing root fairings that are moulded into the fuselage. The outer sections build up in much the same way, but without the pylons, and these can be mounted folded for stowage or unfolded for flight at your whim by adding some PE linkages during construction. The tail fins are simpler, and each elevator has separate sections, while the rudder fin that folds part way up has two separate rudder sections and basic interior detail at the fold point. Again, a couple of extra parts will allow you to portray this folded, so you can choose a "below decks" scenario to save space on your modelling shelves. The twin engines are built up from over 30 parts with a full length provided and a pair of access hatches that could be left open, showing all the detail and your excellent paint job. The intake lip part is a single part with a bullet fairing and triple stator blades. Of course you'll build both engines up in tandem for ease, and because of the handed pylons, they are interchangeable, so there's no worry about putting the wrong engine on the pylons. After adding the engines there are a number of additional aerials, and intakes to add, along with the prominent air-brakes on the rear fuselage, which have retraction jacks included. The main bay doors have PE inserts and a small hinge-point part, fitting to the top of their bays with a retraction jack fitting against the hinge-point. Finally, there is another airbrake under the fuselage ahead of the bomb bay that retracts flush against the fuselage, and is perforated to optimise flow. This can be posed open by the addition of the retraction jack, but check for fit when the aircraft is on its wheels, in case there is any interference. Markings There are two schemes included on the large decal sheets, as well as a whole heap of serials on the second sheet that will be of help if you plan on going off-piste with your decal choices. The decals are printed in-house as usual, and are adequate, although not massively impressive. They have good registration, colour density and sharpness, apart from the diagonals that show some pixelation or "jaggies" under magnification. You can build either of the following from the box: BU.No. 142401 VAH-13 Bats, USS Kitty Hawk, A-3D-2, 611 NH – Grey over white with dark grey walkways on the wings, and an orange band at the top of the tail. BU.No. 142406 VAH-10 Vikings, A-3D-2, 4GQ – Grey over white with orange upper flying surfaces, nose, tail and rudder. Aircraft 401 seems to concur with the airframe's flight history, but 406 does not, and may possibly have been taken from a French language profile that seems to have been fictional, although my school-boy translation of the text shows date and location detail, but gives no other context. 406 seems to have spent most of its service life in the usual grey/white scheme, and it is interesting that both decal options were later converted to KA-3Bs – the tanker variant. Conclusion The designers at Trumpeter have been castigated for using one set of main parts to portray different airframes with subtle changes between each one as mentioned earlier, but if you feel the urge the necessary changes should be within your grasp if you apply some modelling skills, and for those that don't mind the small things, it's an impressively sized model. Have a look at the missing tunnel in the main gear bays too, and decide whether you're going to fix that while you have your tools out. Finally, check out our Walk Around here Recommended with the aforementioned caveats. Review sample courtesy of UK Distributors for
  25. This is a new area for Britmodeller, as it seems that quite a few of us are interested in these large scale models of famous armour such as the Tiger, King Tiger, Sherman, Pershing and many others. Remote control tanks aren't just the bailiwick of Tamiya with their high quality, but expensive kits. Heng Long supply remote control tanks for a fraction of the price, with sound, smoke and engine noises, as do a growing group of other suppliers such are Torro and in un-motorised forms,Trumpeter, Hobby Boss and now Panda. I'm sure I've missed some out, but I'm new to this growing group of modellers. Why the new section? Well, the factors of size and the inclusion of remote control on a lot of these scale kits, they're quite a bit different from the usual scales. They're also a bit harder to store, as the big ones such as the King Tiger are almost 60cm from front to back. Whether you buy them to use as fun toys, or upgrade them so that they're as accurate as possible, they can be quite good fun to play with, although if you're dedicated, you can run up quite a bill even if you don't choose Tamiya. If money is no object, you can go crazy with the Armortek kits, which I think are 1:6 or even crazier with a 1:4 King Tiger that'll cost from between £3,300 and over £10,000 depending on what you specify. That one can pull a car, and looks truly scary. It's quite a broad church though, as the Heng Long Tiger I can be had for around £50 if you shop around, and includes all the features above, with the King Tiger and others weighing in at only a little more for the basic plastic kits. You can spend a couple of hundred on a full-metal version of most tanks, which includes metal gears, wheels and tracks, or you you could buy the cheaper ones and upgrade to metal as parts wear out to keep your costs down. it's all very tempting though! The range of static kits in this larger scale is growing fast, with Panda joining the fray soon with a 1:16 P-38(t) in the next couple of weeks, which our friends at Welsh Dragon Models are hoping to have in stock earlier than most UK suppliers. Keep your eyes peeled for that one, and we'll try and get a review sample in to tempt you with. Dave (Shar2) has joined the moderating team for this larger scale, as he's just dipped his toe into the waters and has become quite interested in a very short time. If you've got any questions, just ask Dave or myself. Mike.
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