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Found 471 results

  1. "How easy it would have been for National Socialist Germany to misuse its superiority in the air just as Great Britain has always done at sea. But in Poland, Adolf Hitler gave the world proof of his military leadership. The Luftwaffe followed his orders and attacked only military targets." -- SS-Standartenführer Toni Winkelnkemper, Der Großangriff auf Köln. Ein Beispiel (Berlin: Franz Eher, 1942) (trans. Randall Bytwerk) "Suddenly two German planes appeared from nowhere and dropped two bombs only two hundred yards away on a small home. Two women in the house were killed. The potato diggers dropped flat upon the ground, hoping to be unnoticed. After the bombers had gone, the women returned to their work. They had to have food. But the Nazi fliers were not satisfied with their work. In a few minutes they came back and swooped down to within two hundred feet of the ground, this time raking the field with machine-gun fire. Two of the seven women were killed. The other five escaped somehow. While I was photographing the bodies, a little ten-year old girl [Kazimiera Mika, actually aged 12] came running up and stood transfixed by one of the dead. The woman was her older sister. The child had never before seen death and couldn't understand why her sister would not speak to her..." -- Julien Bryan, "Warsaw: 1939 Siege; 1959 Warsaw Revisited" "If people were always kind and obedient to those who are cruel and unjust, the wicked people would have it all their own way: they would never feel afraid, and so they would never alter, but would grow worse and worse. When we are struck at without a reason, we should strike back again very hard; I am sure we should—so hard as to teach the person who struck us never to do it again." -- Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre "I keep thinking of Winston Churchill down at Westerham, full of patriotism and ideas for saving the Empire. A man who knows you must act to win. You cannot remain supine and allow yourself to be hit indefinitely." -- Sir Edmund Ironside, Diary entry for 27 July 1939 It's always a struggle to pick out a kit these days, because I know I'll have pathetically little time to work on it and it will take ages and ages, and do I really want to build it for that long? But sooner or later you either have to get off the pot or do what you sat on it to do, so here we are. I decided to build the Trumpeter Wellington Ic I have in my stash, one of three of their Wellington kits I own, and given my current build rate, it will likely be finished around the time the presumably infinitely superior Airfix one comes out (though most Airfix kits these days seem to come complete with one clanger in the box, cf. the Harrier GR3 tail or Hurricane canopy and wing panels). I'll be building Wellington Ic R1593 OJ-N "for Nuts"/FIREFLY of 149 (East India) Squadron, whose motto was Fortis Nocte; Strong By Night. The squadron served as both a night bombing unit in the Great War (flying the delightfully ungainly-looking F.E.2, a personal favourite) and in World War II, where it flew a whole panoply of types: Heyfords, Wellingtons, Stirlings, and Lancasters. After the war, it flew Lincolns, Washingtons, and Canberras, before finally disbanding in 1956. R1593 was damaged beyond repair during a raid on Bremen on 14/15 July 1941, when she was coned by searchlights at 8,000 feet and hit hard by flak. Skillful evasive maneuvers by her pilot, Sergeant (later Warrant Officer) Donald Anthony "Tony" Gee (23/1/1920-7/10/1942) brought the aircraft down to 2,000 feet and enabled her and her (miraculously unhurt) crew to struggle back to Mildenhall, where she crash-landed. Sadly, Warrant Officer Gee was killed in a flying accident on 7 October 1942 while instructing on a training flight in Wellington Ic R1801 from 28 OTU when a piece of fabric tore off the wing while the aircraft was airborne. He was 22, had flown 37 missions over enemy territory, and left behind his wife Irene. The kit decals are a rather voluptuous, if not alarmingly sensual, red, and the codes are a rather anemic, unhealthy looking exceptionally pale grey (roughly the colour of the late Christopher Lee's flesh in Dracula...possibly drained of their vital essence by the roundels) which is why we're building N-Nuts off a Techmod sheet, rather than the kit option of a 301 ("Ziemi Pomorskiej") Squadron aircraft of the Free Polish forces. Also, I generally like nose art. N-Nuts in life. My workbench is as clean as it's gonna get. Let's get going.
  2. USS Ranger, CV-4. 1:350

    USS Ranger, CV-4 Trumpeter 1:350 The USS Ranger (CV-4) was the first aircraft carrier for the US Navy to be specifically designed and built from the keel up. The previous three carriers were converted from existing ship designs and constituted the USS Langley, the USS Lexington and the USS Saratoga - the Langley (CV-1) being a converted collier while the Lexington (CV-2) and Saratoga (CV-3) were built from cancelled battle cruiser keels. In 1922, designs were requested by the United States Navy for an aircraft carrier having more speed and expanded storage for more aircraft than existing carriers in the fleet at the time. The USS Ranger had been planned to have a flat, unobstructed flight deck with no island superstructure and six smoke stacks (funnels) - three to each side - that were hinged to fold horizontally during air operations. An island superstructure was eventually added during construction. A pair of service cranes would facilitate the recovery of seaplanes. Construction was started in 1931 at the Norfolk Navy Yard with work being handled by the Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company for $2,160,000. The USS Ranger was named for the American colonial fighting men who knew the habits of the enemy and could effectively serve as scouts and combatants behind enemy lines. Ranger was smaller than the USS Saratoga and USS Lexington but, having been constructed from scratch as a dedicated aircraft carrier, she was engineered for maximum aircraft stowage. She displaced about 1/3 the tonnage of the larger ships but was able to carry almost the same complement of planes - 86 against 91 aircraft on the Saratoga and Lexington. She was 769 ft long (234.39m) and, her beam was 109.6ft (33.41m) while her draught was 22.5ft (6.86m). She was slower than the Lexington-class, with a maximum speed of 29.3kts (34mph), and had a range of 12,000 miles (19,312km). For air and sea defence she mounted 8 x 5-inch (130mm)/25 calibre Dual-Purpose (DP) cannons in single mountings and 40 x .50-inch (13mm) anti-aircraft machine guns placed in various positions around the flight deck. Her normal complement was 2,461 officers and men and, fully loaded, she weighed 17,859 tons. Ranger had six oil-fed boilers driving two steam turbines that delivered 53,500 shaft horsepower equating to 39,000kW connected to 2 shafts. The final planning decisions required Ranger's fire control system be cut down, ammunition storage space reduced, and torpedo planes would be eliminated along with their torpedoes due to the lack of room for their storage. Dive bomber aircraft would be used instead and on-deck catapults were to be cancelled as were aircraft booms and safety nets. The arresting gear system was reduced. Ranger was originally planned as a 13,800-ton aircraft carrier under the Washington Naval Treaty but she exceeded this by some 700 tons with her final displacement being 17,500 tons at full load. A major change to the design was made in 1932 that added the island superstructure along the starboard side of the deck forward of the three hinged smoke stacks. The hull was 730 feet in length and her flight deck extended her overall length to 769 feet. On September 26, 1931, Ranger's keel was officially laid. Seventeen months later, the ship was launched and she was subsequently commissioned on June 4th, 1934. The first aircraft landed on her deck - this on June 21st, 1934 - was a SBU-1 Biplane fighter piloted by LtCdr A.C. Davis. The Ranger also received Grumman J2F Duck Bi-Seaplanes. Ranger was more or less an experiment for the debate within the Navy Department as to whether carriers should be small or large based on the limitations of the Washington Naval Treaty. The US Navy saw that the Japanese Navy had produced small carriers and thoughts were that smaller US carriers could be used for anti-submarine warfare (ASW), airborne reconnaissance and destruction of enemy shore strong points. However, during operations throughout the 1930s, the outcome prevailed that the US Navy should focus on larger, faster carriers. USS Ranger left Norfolk on June 21st, 1934 for her "shakedown" training cruise with her new crew and air wings. She cruised off the United States Virginia Capes and conducted standard drills for the crew and flight operations for her new squadrons. She continued south to Rio de Janeiro, Buenos Aires, and Montevideo, South America. Here she showed the flag and continued training and drills. On October 4th, 1934, she steamed back to Norfolk for the standard dry dock repairs. On April 1st, 1935 she sailed for the Pacific through the Panama Canal and, six days later, and arrived in port at San Diego, California on 15th. San Diego was her first assigned port and, for the next four years, she patrolled up and down the West Coast as far north as Alaska, as far south as Callao, Peru and as far west as Hawaii. She departed San Diego on January 4th, 1939 for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba for fleet operations in the Caribbean. After the exercises were completed, she steamed back to Norfolk, arriving on April 20th, 1939. Ranger was then assigned to cruise the eastern seaboard out of Norfolk and into the Caribbean Sea as her normal patrol station. In the fall of 1939, after total war in Europe had broken out, she commenced Neutrality Patrol operations out of Bermuda along the trade routes of the middle Atlantic and up the eastern seaboard to Newfoundland. She was found to be lacking in sea keeping ability for she could not operate aircraft along her decks in heavy weather conditions. On December 7th, 1941, Ranger was returning to Norfolk from a patrol around Trinidad and Tobago when the Japanese Navy attacked Pearl Harbor. Ranger arrived at Norfolk on December 8th where she was resupplied and took on normal scheduled personnel replacements. She sailed on the 21st for patrol in the South Atlantic and re-entered the Norfolk Navy Yard for repairs on March 21th 1942. Ranger was one of fourteen US Navy ships to receive the early RCA CXAM-1 radar system and also took on the new Grumman Wildcat fighter squadrons to replace her outmoded SBD-1 biplanes. Ranger served as flagship of Rear Admiral A. B. Cook, Commander, Carriers, Atlantic Fleet. She was ordered to Quonset Point, Rhode Island and was loaded with sixty-eight US Army Curtiss P-40 Warhawk pursuit fighters along with their pilots and ground crews of the Army's 33d Pursuit Squadron. Ranger put to sea on April 22nd and made landfall on May 10th at Aeera on the Gold Coast of Africa where she launched the Army P-40 squadron. This was the first time US Army planes were launched from a carrier flight deck. She returned to Quonset Point, Rhode Island on May 28th, 1942, and was loaded with seventy-two more Army P-40 pursuit planes, again destined for Aeera, Africa, finally arriving there and launching aircraft on the 19th. Upon returning to Norfolk, she trained with four escort carriers that had been converted from exiting tankers. The escorts had new crews and Ranger gave valuable training on all phases of carrier operations. The escorts were brought online to help in convoy protection in the Atlantic crossing from German Navy attacks. Ranger was the biggest aircraft carrier in Atlantic waters and was assigned four Sangomon-class escort carriers for defence - each fielding 25 to 34 aircraft. This task force was to provide air cover for the upcoming amphibious invasion of German-controlled French Morocco on November 8th, 1942. Ranger and her task force was 30 miles north of Casablanca and launched her aircraft at 0615 hours, attacking Rabat airfields and destroying 21 enemy aircraft on the ground and strafing the French headquarters without any losses. Additional planes from Ranger's force destroyed another seven enemy planes on the Port Lyautey airfield while others strafed four French destroyers in Casablanca Harbor. The operation lasted three days and Ranger's task force launched a total of 496 sorties in support of the three-pronged landing. The French destroyer Albatros was bombed twice on her forward deck area causing 300 casualties. The French cruiser Primaugut was attacked and damaged as she sorted from Casablanca Harbor. Aircraft dropped depth charges on two submarines and destroyed coastal defences and anti-aircraft batteries. Ranger's pilots reported 21 light enemy tanks were attacked with many destroyed along with 86 military vehicles. Overall, Allied planes destroyed 70+ enemy planes on the ground and shot down 15 in aerial combat. Ranger's task force lost 16 aircraft. Casablanca surrendered to the Allied Forces on November 11th, 1942 to which Ranger departed the Moroccan coast the next day and steamed into Norfolk, Virginia on the 23rd. Ranger stayed in the Norfolk Navy Yard for needed repairs and aircraft replacement from December 16th, 1942 to February 7th, 1943. Returning to her ferrying role, she was loaded with seventy-five P-40-L Army pursuit planes headed to Casablanca, Africa, arriving there on February 23th, 1943. Returning to Norfolk, she patrolled the East Coast of America and steamed with the British Home Fleet at Scapa Flow, Scotland on August 19th, helping to patrol the sea approaches to the British Isles. The new mission was to attack German shipping in Norwegian waters. On October 2nd, she sailed and attacked a small convoy, sinking two ships and damaging a pair of merchantmen in the process. Further combat sorties destroyed a freighter and damaged another two ships. Air combat shot down two German planes with three Ranger Wildcats lost. Ranger and her squadron returned to Scapa Flow on October 6th, 1943 and she patrolled with the Home Fleet once more before reaching Boston on December 4th, 1943. Soon after her return she began training but soon was ordered to Staten Island, New York to pick up seventy-six P-38 fighter aircraft along with US Army and Navy and French Naval personnel. Casablanca, again, was the destination to which she arrived there on May 4th, 1944. After Ranger unloaded her inventory, damaged US Army aircraft were loaded aboard for stateside repairs. Also, a number of military passengers were taken aboard for their return to New York. Arriving at New York on May 16th, Ranger returned to the Norfolk Navy Yard for repairs and new equipment. The flight deck was strengthened for installation of a new catapult and the radar was upgraded. Arresting gear was installed that provided her with a capacity for night fighter interceptor training. On July 11th, 1944 Ranger departed Norfolk for San Diego, arriving there July 25th. She received the men and aircraft of Night Fighting Squadron 102 and a thousand US Marines. Ranger trained in Hawaiian waters for the next three months, conducting night carrier training operations. On October 18th, Ranger departed Pearl Harbor for San Diego to train air groups and squadrons along the California coast until the end of the war. On September 30th, 1945 she steamed for New Orleans for Navy Day scheduled for October 19th to which she then headed for the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard on November 18th for an overhaul. She was decommissioned at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard on October 18th, 1946, struck from the Navy Register on October 29th, 1946 and sold for scrapping to Sun Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company of Chester, Pennsylvania on January 28th, 1947. During World War 2, US Ranger served mostly in escort carrier roles for convoy escort, aircraft transport and amphibious support for she lacked sufficient speed or capacity to operate as a fleet carrier during her tenure. Of the eight pre-war U.S. aircraft carriers, these being CV-1 through CV-8, USS Ranger was one of only three to survive all of World War 2. The others became the USS Enterprise and the USS Saratoga. The USS Ranger received two battle stars for her service in the conflict and most of her operations were centred in the Atlantic. Departing San Diego on 30 September 1945, she embarked civilian and military passengers at Balboa and then steamed for New Orleans, Louisiana, arriving on 18 October. Following Navy Day celebrations there, she sailed on 30 October for brief operations at Pensacola, Florida as a training carrier, later relieved in that role by Saipan. After calling at Norfolk, she entered the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard on 19 November for overhaul. She remained on the eastern seaboard until decommissioned at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard on 18 October 1946. Struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 29 October, she was sold for scrap to Sun Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, Chester, Pennsylvania on 31 January 1947 The Model It’s great to see Trumpeter continuing to release new ships, and aircraft carriers in particular. Whilst not one of the most famous ships in the US Navy, USS Ranger was still important in her own right, not only being the first US carrier built from the ground up, but also showing that restricting the build to such a relatively small size didn’t really work, especially in the Pacific where the Fleet carriers really came into their own. The kit comes in an attractive top opening box with an artist’s rendition of the ship at sea. In the box there is a protected area which contains the single piece hull moulding, the hanger deck and flight deck. These and ten other sprues are all in a light grey plastic. There are fifteen sprues for the aircraft in a combination of black, grey and clear plastic, along with three etched brass sheets, a large decal sheet and a length of chain. All the plastic parts are beautifully moulded with no sign of flash of other imperfections, but there are quite a few moulding pips. Considering the size of some of the mouldings it’s surprising there aren’t any sink marks, and is a testament to Trumpeters designers and mould makers. From the research I’ve been able to do, online and reference books, the shape of the hull is pretty accurate, as is the bridge structure and flight deck. Construction begins with the hull upside down and the fitting of the propeller shafts, A frame shaft supports, propellers and the single rudder. The hull is then turned upright and the hanger deck glued into place, with three bulkheads glued to the deck around the aft lift well. The side bulkheads are then glued into place around the aft hull, with optionally opened/closed shutters. There are three large intakes either side aft as well as three flight deck supports. Two more bulkheads are fitted around the aft lift well. The six funnels are each assembled from ten plastic and a PE funnel cap. They have been designed to be movable but you could also glue them in the position you want to keep them. Three of the funnel assemblies are then glued into their respective positions on the port side. The foredeck is also fitted at this point and another of the side bulkheads. More sub-assemblies are built up, these include 47 two piece 20mm Oerlikons, six, five piece quad 40mm Bofors, and eight, nine piece 5” mountings. The side bulkheads around the port side forward hull are now glued into position, again with optionally open/closed shutters, but being two and three bay shutters you will have cut them apart if you don’t want them all open. Fifteen, four piece carley float ramps are then assembled, as well as the beautiful PE floatplane handling cranes. These are then glued into position, along with more flightdeck supports bulkhead mounted structures and the railings. The Oerlikon galleries for the port side are then attached amidships and aft, along with the internal lift support columns on the inside of the bulkhead. The starboard side bulkhead is fitted with several platforms and supports before being glued into place. The two main battery directors are each made from four plastic and seven PE parts. The radars array of each needs to be carefully rolled and bent to shape, so pay close attention to the instructions diagram. The bridge is made up from only nine main parts, but is then detailed with two saluting guns, vertical and inclined ladders, the two director assemblies, eight piece mast assembly, two more radars, two PE wind deflectors, and the various railings. The completed assembly is then put to one side. The starboard side funnel position is assembled a fitted to the deck, along with three intakes and the three remaining funnels. These are then followed by the starboard side aft bulkheads being glued into position, along with the flightdeck supports, railings, crane, and Oerlikon galleries. Two, two piece ships boats are then assembled and fitted to their cradles, before being glued into position in the open bays either side of the ship. Two boat booms are then attached; two per side aft, while two bulkhead are glued to the forward hanger area. The Oerlikon galleries are then fitted with the Oerlikon assemblies, along with more railings, the 5” gun platforms and the two accommodation ladders. The stern and quarterdeck is detailed with platform, ventilators, railings, gas bottles, inclined ladders, two Oerlikons and a quad 40mm, while the aft 5” mounts are fitted to their platforms, two per side. Right forward, the 5” mounting platforms are attached, while the complex lattice of the flightdeck support beams are assembled and glued to the centre section of the hanger. The fo’c’sle is fitted with cleats, bollards, capstans, anchor chains, and railings. The anchors are glued into place, as are the 40mm mounting platforms just aft of the 5” platforms. The four flight deck supports are also fitted to the fo’c’sle, as is a Quad 40mm mount, 40mm director platform and a large deck house. The 5” mounts are fitted to their platforms, as are the side mounted quad 40’s and yet more railing. Before the flightdeck is fitted, the lattice structure fore and aft needs to be glued into position as are the foreward Oerlikon galleries. With the deck in place, the Oerlikons are fitted, as are the PE arrester wires, lifts and folding deck flaps for the funnels. Two more quad 40mm mountings are assembled and fitted with the guns, before being fitted fore and aft of the island, which is also glued into place, as is a 40mm director tower, just foreward of the island, completing the ship build. There are however, fifteen aircraft to assemble, five SBD-3 Dauntless, five TBF-1 Avenger, and five F6F-3 Hellcats. Each aircraft is built up much like a larger scale aircraft, with separate fuselage sides, horizontal tailplanes, canopies, cowlings propellers and undercarriage. The F6F and TBF both have the option of folding wings. Note however, that you should research the period for which you are building the Ranger, as early in her career, she didn’t carry torpedo bombers, only dive bombers and fighters. Decals The very large decal sheet, is very well printed. There are a full range of markings for the flightdeck, including the lift surrounds and three dotted lines that extend the full length of the deck. The large flightdeck id numbers are at least the correct colour for the period, being black, whereas in other carrier kits they were white. There are also examples of the Stars and Stripes in wave or straight forms. Each of the aircraft is provided with a full set of national insignia, but no individual squadron codes are provided. The decals look suitably thin, so great care will be needed when laying the flightdeck stripes down, they appear in good register and nicely opaque. Conclusion Well, what can I say, being ex-FAA, I naturally love aircraft carries, no matter what nation or era, so it’s great to see another one released. Ok, it’s not eh biggest, or the most well known, but this doesn’t make it any less important, particularly for the US fleet. To see the USS Ranger being released in this scale is a joy to see, and something I wouldn’t have thought ever happening in my modelling life. Having pretty much everything in the box, It would be difficult to imagine how the aftermarket companies can improve on the kit, other than some nice detail for the hanger and perhaps some deck handling vehicles. Review sample courtesy of UK Distributors for
  3. I've been away from this forum for a year now.Had absolutely no will to make any kits in that period of time but recently I got back into it.Currently working on getting this Stryker done before Christmas. It's a pretty good kit by Trumpeter,surprisingly cheap too. Took these pics with my phone thus the crap quality,colors are a bit off too... Yes that gap in between the panels is annoying. Lol the colors are so off on this one that it makes mud and dust look like rust.
  4. A glimpse into the future catalog Trumpeter 2018-2019. For the moment just bins with wheels and tracks. Source: https://www.facebook.com/TrumpeterModel/posts/887811154710812 V.P.
  5. Trumpeter is to release a 1/32nd MiG-29 "Fulcrum" family in 2016-2017 ref.03223 - MiG-29A 9.12 "Fulcrum-A" ref.03224 - MiG-29C 9.13 "Fulcrum-C" ref.03225 - MiG-29SMT 9.17 "Fulcrum-F" ref.03226 - MiG-29UB 9.51 "Fulcrum-B" Source: http://scalemodels.ru/modules/news/img_9587_1449140962_10.jpg.html V.P.
  6. Trumpeter is to release in 2017-2018 a new tool 1/48th de Havilland DH.110 Sea Vixen FAW.2 - ref. 05808 Source: https://www.facebook.com/TrumpeterModel/photos/pcb.718760784949184/718760511615878/?type=3&theater V.P.
  7. Hi everyone, here are two recent(ish) completions! Here we have the Shigure, built utilising the other half of Fujimi's two-in-one kit I used to build the Yudachi model I completed back in 2015. Built almost OOB, the only additions are the single 25mm AA guns which were sourced from Skywave weapon sets. Painted in Humbrol and Colourcoats enamels. Next, we have the Z-21 Wilheim Heidkamp built using the Trumpeter kit, also in 1/700. The model depicts the ship at the time of it's loss at 1st Narvik. Again primarily OOB, the only alteration being the representation of the lockers behind the bridge supports, boat chocks for the motor launches and the short bulwark ahead of the aft set of boats. This time the model was painted primarily in Colourcoats enamels with Humbrol for the black, brown, red, yellow and the silver funnel caps. The recognition markings were done using 1/144 scale aircraft swastika's from Mark 1 Decals: LINK. The two side by side: Comments welcome! Mike.
  8. Hello! This is my first build on this forum. Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-19 (NATO reporting name: Farmer) is a Soviet second-generation, single-seat, twin jet-engined fighter aircraft. It was the first Soviet production aircraft capable of supersonic speeds in level flight. Selected aircraft model is not random. This aircaft placed near my house at 500 metres near Aircaft University (like monument): Addons and aftermakets: - Masks Eduard EX139 - PE Eduard 49309 - Equipage wheels - Ejection seat PAVLA-S4801 After start teaching blueprints I see next: Trumpeter nose is wrong! I'm order resin kit "Correct nose SBS-48034" for fix it. Ejection seat resin: + PE Eduard + original details = Attach resin nose with fuselage
  9. Trumpeter is to release in 2017-2018 new tool 1/48th Aero L-39 Albatros kits: - ref.05804 - Aero L-39C Albatros - ref.05805 - Aero L-39ZA Albatros Source: https://www.facebook.com/TrumpeterModel/photos/pcb.718760784949184/718760501615879/?type=3&theater V.P.
  10. Trumpeter is to release in 2017-2018 a new tool 1/48th Fairey Firefly Mk.1 (image from Firefly Mk.VI...) - ref.05810 Source: https://www.facebook.com/TrumpeterModel/photos/pcb.718760784949184/718760511615878/?type=3&theater V.P.
  11. Trumpeter King Tiger

    I have had this beast on my bench for months now and I have been taking pictures of the progression I have been making on it. The only problem is that I haven't uploaded them so I have over 100 pictures that need to be shared. I have been doing my best to make the tank as historically accurate as possible thanks to the book.
  12. Hello guys, just finish this GAZ-66 with his double gun. More picts soon.
  13. Trumpeter is to release a 1/72nd "Foxhound" family in 2016-2017 - ref.01679 - MiG-31 - released - ref.01680 - MiG-31B/BM - released - ref.01681 - MiG-31M Source: http://scalemodels.ru/modules/news/img_9587_1449141069_20.jpg.html V.P.
  14. MiG-31B/BM Photo Etch and Masks for Trumpeter Kit 1:72 Eduard Eduard seem to have tracked the release of Trumpeter's new line up of Russian jets in 1:72 fairly closely. Each time a new kit has been released, we haven't had to wait long for a set of photo etch and masks. There is even a growing range of high-quality resin hardware to hang off the bottom of your chosen kit. This month is the turn of the new MiG-31B/BM kit to receive the Eduard treatment. MiG-31B/BM In the usual Eduard style, this set comprises two frets of parts. The first fret contains pre-painted parts for detailing the cockpit and includes harnesses, cushions, pull handles and other details for the seats, as well as details for the instrument panels and side consoles. Also included are parts for the rudder pedals. The second fret is unpainted and contains a new head-up display unit, parts for detailing the join between the canopy and the cockpit and parts for detailing the mating edges of the canopy itself. Clearly this part of the set will be of use only if you wish to finished your model with the canopy open. MiG-31B/BM Zoom If you don't wish to finish your model with an open canopy then you may be better off plumping for the Zoom set. If you do, the only other part you will really be missing out on is the head-up display unit. MiG-31B/BM Exterior This is a fairly small set which provides some details for the rest of the airframe. There are new tail structures for the R-77 missiles, new fences for the upper wing, details for the inside of the airbrake (which will necessitate removing a small amount of plastic from the kit parts), strakes and static discharge wicks for the tail and a whole host of aerials, antennas and other small surface details for the forward part of the fuselage. The insides of the landing gear doors receive extra details, and there are replacement parts for both ends of the mighty Soloviev turbofans. MiG-31 Pre-Cut Masks This set provides pre-cut paint masks for the canopy and all of the wheels. If you've used Eduard's pre-cut masks before, you'll know that they are a real time saver. Conclusion These sets are a handy upgrade for the new Trumpeter kit. The cockpit seems to be the main beneficiary of the first set, while the exterior set is worth having for the replacement strakes and extra details for the undercarriage. Masks are really just a time saver, but still worth considering if, like me, your modelling time is restricted. Review sample courtesy of
  15. Trumpeter 1/16 King Tiger

    I have been working on the Trumpeter Tiger II for almost half a year now (yes I have pictures of the progress). But I've run into a problem with the Turret basket, on the real Tiger II there is the diamond plating at the bottom of the basket and in the kit the basket is bare. I also noticed that the diamond pattern around the turret basket is also incorrect and they are missing the diamond pattern for the drivers' feet. I am curious as to where one could acquire the correct diamond pattern and size. I have been looking around and couldn't find anything that is correct.
  16. I finally found one, and in Canada. Turns out a friend has 2 so it cost me a Trumpeter 1/48 VIIC U-Boat which I bought today and traded him for the 1/16 King Tiger and ATAK Zimmerit to fit. Both still sealed in the plastic bags and ready to butcher. I still have that 1/16 Jagdtiger coming that might get here before Christmas so it's getting interesting and a little cramped around here. My modelling budget is shot what with the car repair, etc but I couldn't turn this down. Hope Trumpeter doesn't release the 1/16 Panther too soon. Huge box and the option to have a clear or opaque turret or upper hull. Obviously I'll have some clear parts as spares. Metal sprockets and idlers and the tracks are individual links but they came pre-assembled. That's good as it was not fun assembling the tracks for that aborted Jagdtiger I started back in January.
  17. Hello, Once again I'll try to build a model. And how iconic would it be when they first model in years finished would be a Flanker. So off it goes. I cut out some parts from the intakes and started to adjust the engine fronts as it's going to be flying! Photoshopped some turning fans to go in the intakes as well. Photo's soon! Greetings! Typo edit 😉
  18. Update: complete Trumpeter catalogue 2017-2018 online here: http://www.moxingfans.com/new/news/2016/1228/3083.html --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- First pictures from the Trumpeter catalog 2017-2018. Stay tuned. Source: https://www.facebook.com/TrumpeterModel/posts/695807090577887 Remember, thread about Trumpeter's catalog 2016-2017 is here: http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234992484-trumpeter-catalog-2016-2017-programme/ http://www.themodellingnews.com/2015/12/trumpeter-catalogue-2016-2017-lets-see.html Up until now only infos for mud & pebbles movers, flintstones etc. V.P.
  19. Our shelves are over flowing with too many MiG-31 kits in 1/72 and 1/48, so we've dropped the prices in order to see if anyone can be tempted into buying any if them! The AMK MiG-31B/BS is now 20% cheaper than UK RRP! The 1/48 Hobby Boss MiG-31 is about 39% cheaper than UK RRP! It will be doubtful whether we'll have these kits in again, unless it's by special order (and that will be more expensive), so if you like MiG-31's get them before we sell out! thanks Mike AMK 1/48 Ltd Ed MiG-31BM/BSM - £46.90 http://www.mjwmodels.co.uk/amk88003s-148-mikoyan-mig-31bmbsm-limited-edition-5306-p.asp AMK 1/48 MiG-31B/BS - £44.50 http://www.mjwmodels.co.uk/amk88008--148-mikoyan-mig-31bbs-foxhound-5128-p.asp Hobby Boss 1/48 MiG-31 - £39.50 http://www.mjwmodels.co.uk/hbb81753-148-mikoyan-mig-31-foxhound-5450-p.asp Trumpeter 1/72 MiG-31 - £31.00 http://www.mjwmodels.co.uk/tru01679-172-mikoyan-gurevich-mig-31-foxhound-5985-p.asp
  20. We've had a double delivery today with loads more goodies available at discounted prices! Head over to our website for a look now, before we run out of things! http:/www.mjwmodels.co.uk New stuff - AMK 1/72 Kfir (back in stock!), Sword 1/72 Seafire XVII double kit and FJ-2 Fury, Trumpeter 1/700 USS Yorktown CV-5 (Midway/Coral Sea, been waiting ages for that one!) Bargains - Hobby Boss 1/48 - Su-27 Flanker (early), Su-30MKK Flanker, Kamov Ka-27 Helix, FJ-4B Fury, Eduard 1/72 'Boys are Back in Town' Spitfire IX triple set. Don't forget all the existing bargains, most of which we only have 1 or 2 of in stock. All the bargains are on the home page, just scroll down. We have loads of WW2 1/48 Luftwaffe aircraft kits and Cold War/Modern Russian aircraft kits with 1/3 or more off RRP, while stocks last! So if there's anything you must have, get it while it's cheap or wait and buy it when it's a lot more expensive! Don't forget the 1 working day turnaround and VAT free shopping for non EU customers! thanks Mike
  21. HMS Roberts Trumpeter 1/350 History HMS Roberts was the first of a two ship class of 15” Monitors. Her keel was laid on April 30th 1940 at John Browns shipyard on the Clyde, and was launched on the 1st of February 1941. HMS Roberts was commissioned, six months late, (due mainly to have repairs made good on damage caused during an air raid), on 6th October 1941, she left Clydebank three days later for the Gareloch where she was dry docked in a floating dock brought up specifically for the job, as no other dock was able to accommodate the Roberts extreme beam. Once trials and final adjustments had been completed, it wasn’t until 13th November that she sailed for work up and to prepare for the long voyage out to the Mediterranean via the Cape of Good Hope. She did not arrive at Suez until the 26th February 1942. She remained at Suez, acting as AA guardship, and was anchored about three miles south of the canal entrance. Her radars and AA directors, added to her design during construction, proving particularly useful, although no action was actually seen during this time. In July 1942 she moved down the Red Sea for a few weeks , before she was ordered to sail for an unspecified operation. This operation turned out to be Operation Torch, the landings in North Africa. Throughout the landings she was anchored seven miles off the coast, but didn’t fire a shot as the French fort Sidi Ferruch did not resist the allied troops. The day after the landings she acted as radar guardship, warning of the approach of any German aircraft from the direction of Tunisia. Her AA guns were used against sustained air attacks, particularly from Ju-88s. She continued in this role until the 11th, when she was hit by two 500kg bombs, one hitting the port side sloping armour on the bulge and the other just aft of the funnel. She was immobilised for two days, before repairs were completed to allow her to sail, all the time still under constant air attack. During the operation she had fired off some 30,000 rounds of AA ammunition in less than a week. With the worst of the bomb damage repaired she went back to her duties and AA guardship until finally relieved, sailing for Gibraltar and home, arriving in Liverpool on the 6th January. The rest of 1943 saw the Roberts providing both AA and 15” cover for operations around the Mediterranean including the landings at Salerno, where she bombarded enemy positions from the 9th to the 19th of September on which she sailed back to Malta to replenish her ammunition as she had fired almost her entire complement of 15” shells during the actions off the beaches. April 1944 HMS Roberts found herself back in home waters to work up for Operation Neptune and to carry out practice bombardments on the Kintyre range in company with the other ships of the bombardment fleet. Owing to her slow speed, she had to sail several days in advance of the rest of Force D, arriving at Spithead on the 28th May to await orders for the invasion fleet to sail to France. On the 5th June she sailed as part of convoy S.6, joining up with the other bombardment ships and minesweepers coming from the Clyde. The Roberts anchored in her firing position eleven miles west of LeHavre at 05.20 on the 6th of June 1944, three minutes later she opened fire from about 20,000 yards range on the Houlgate battery, which had four ex-French 155mm guns, ten miles east of Sword beach. A heavy fire was kept up on the enemy batteries until H hour. Roberts fired some twenty seven rounds during this period, but had difficulty in spotting the fall of shot due to enemy smokescreens and the failure of some armoured piercing rounds to explode in the marshy ground. Periodic fire was required throughout the day to silence any batteries that showed signs of interfering with the build up of troops, vehicles and stores on the beachhead. Most batteries though concentrated their fire on the bombardment ships rather than the flimsy landing craft. During the afternoon of D-Day Roberts made a particularly successful shoot on Houlgate, after sixteen rounds, the spotting fighter reported several direct hits and two large explosions. At 21.30 she had just started to fire on a troop concentration inland from Sword beach, when a crash was heard and a large chunk of metal was seen to fly up in front of the bridge. On ceasing fire it was found that the right 15in had burst its jacket. The jacket had split into several pieces without the whole gun bursting, so further damage was prevented by strapping it with wire rope. It wasn’t until after further action off the Seine and on targets around Caen, using only the one good barrel that she finally was sent back to Portsmouth on the 14th June with only 37 of her compliment of 235 15in rounds left and to replace her guns as the remaining barrel was also out of life. One of the replacement guns was No102, which is now to be found outside the Imperial War Museum, London. By the 21st of June Roberts was back on station on the Eastern flank of the beachhead. Up until the final day of the bombardment operation on the 18th July she continued to give covering fire throughout her operational area. To increase the range out to 30,000 yards the monitor was flooded on one side to give a three degree list to give the guns greater elevation. Roberts returned to Portsmouth on the 23rd July for the next ten weeks, to change her guns, again, give leave and repair the wear and tear of six weeks almost continuous bombardment in which she had fired 692 rounds of 15in, of which only about sixty being armoured piercing. Having completed her duties off the French coast, Roberts took part in the commando landings at Flushing and bombarded the gun emplacements around Zeebrugge. This turned out to be the last action HMS Roberts would take part in, as although she was primed at four hours notice to bombard forts on Heligoland, the operations were called off as the German defence of the Reich collapsed, and the ship’s crew celebrated VE day in Portsmouth. Allocated to the Far East Fleet, she sailed to the Mersey for a quick refit before setting sail on the 27th July 1945 bound for the Indian Ocean where she was ordered arrive before the 1st September to acclimatise before operations against Singapore. Fortunately, the dropping of the two atomic bombs precluded they use, yet she and her sister Abercrombie continued to sail Eastwards until the formal Japanese surrender. The order for the two ships to return and reduce to reserve came on the 11th September, by which time the Roberts had reached Kilindini. The Roberts finally arrived at Plymouth on the 22nd November. Whilst her sister didn’t survive long after the war, being reduced to an accommodation ship and turret drill ship in 1946 before being laid up in Fareham Creek in 1953 and scrapped in 1954/55, HMS Roberts survived quite a bit longer. After arriving in Devonport, she stayed there until 1965, being used as a turret drill ship, accommodation ship and even the headquarters of a sailing club. On the 3rd of August 1965 she arrived at the Wards berth in Inverkeithing to be scrapped. This was the end of the Big Gun Monitors in the Royal Navy after nearly 50 years of service. The Model It was a very pleasant surprise to hear of Trumpeter releasing this 1:350 kit as it would be the first time it has been done in this scale as an injection moulding. The only other option has been the fantastic, but rather expensive resin offering from White Ensign Models. Due to one thing and another we didn’t receive the kit for review until very recently, so I was eager to get the box open and see what it was like. The box lid has a nice painting of the Roberts on the gun line of one of its operations. On opening the box the modeller is confronted with seven sprues of light grey styrene, with separate hull halves and main deck. There are also three frets of etched brass, a small stand and an even smaller decal sheet. The mouldings are really nicely done with some fine detail evident throughout the sprues. There are no signs of defects and not that many moulding pips, being only seen on some of the smaller parts. Unfortunately there is quite a big fly in the ointment as, once again, Trumpeter seem to have mucked up the hull, particularly the foreward end of the bulge, which runs to far foreward on each side, to almost underneath the anchors. The whole hull doesn’t appear deep enough either, although the general shape isn’t too bad. The foreward bulge really needs to sanded away, but due to the way it’s indented this would leave a whole that will require sheeting over with plasticard and filler, probably something only the most fastidious modeller would try. Moving on to the build, construction starts with the two hull halves being joined together. Now, there are several large spurs on both hull joints and gunwhales where they have been cut away from the sprues, which have to be carefully removed before joining. Even though the hull is pretty stiff already due to the shape, Trumpeter have provided three bulkheads and two joining pins to give extra strength and also for giving the main deck somewhere to be affixed to. That said, the next step is to fix the main deck to the hull, before being turned over to have the bilge keels attached, followed by the two propeller shafts, a frames, propellers and rudders fitted into their respective positions. With the hull complete, it’s on with a raft of sub-assemblies, including windlasses, air vents, lookout binoculars, and two Type 282 directors. The weapons assemblies are then built up, the octuple and quad pom pom mounts, (the instructions appear to be wrong, in that it tells you to build two octuple mounts and one quad, whereas it should be the other way round), single 40mm mounts, (which weren’t fitted to the Roberts until 1945), include both styrene and etched parts, whereas the four twin 4” turrets and twin 20mm mounts, (only fitted to the Roberts in 1945), are purely styrene in construction. The next batch of sub-assemblies include the Type 284 directors, fitted with etched Yagi aerials, and three different styles of liferafts, stacked in twos and fours. The main 15” turret is made up of the main turret, turret base and a choice of either moveable barrels, without blast bags, or fixed, with blast bags. Putting the sub-assemblies aside, and with the hull the right way up, the breakwater and storage locker are fitted to the foredeck, along with two 40mm gun tubs. Either side of the main barbette the two quad pom pom splinter shields are fitted, whilst further back on each side the splinter shields for the 4” turrets are attached. The many and various ready use lockers, complete with etched doors are fitted in their appropriate positions, followed by the liferaft stacks. The four paravanes, windlasses, fore and aft anchors, plus their anchor chains and more ready use lockers are fitted. The build then moves onto the aft superstructure with the structures of 01 deck being glued onto the bottom structure. The etched vertical ladders are fitted, along with yet more ready use lockers, followed by the Type 284 mounts, octuple pom pom, three 40mm mounts, the emergency steering position and the twin 20mm mounts. The railings around the 02 deck structures are also attached, thoughtfully provided in the kit. Moving foreward the single piece bridge structure, (like a smaller Queen Annes Mansions seen on the likes of HMS Warspite), which is fitted out with the rear upper bridge surround, rear bridge detail plate, ready use lockers, vertical and inclined ladders, chart and wireless offices, lookout binoculars, aldis lamps, main rangefinder and bridge screen. The structure between the bridge and turret barbette is fitted out with two twin 20mm mounts, their ready use lockers and another stack of liferafts. The funnel is moulded in two halves, which, once joined together is topped out with a two piece etched funnel cap and fitted out with a number of steam pipes on the forward face. These assemblies are then attached to the main deck and at last it’s beginning to look like a warship. Before the assembly of the two masts the midships 40mm mounts are fitted in their elevated tubs, whilst either side of the turret barbette, in similar elevated mounts the two Type 282 directors are fitted. More railings around the upper decks can be fitted now, or the modeller may wish to wait till the end of the main build. The mainmast is assembled from a single pole foreward and double pole moulding aft, connected by two Y shaped struts. To the front pole a long vertical etched ladder is affixed. The top of the mast is fitted out with an oblong star platform on which the mast for the aft Type 281aerial is attached, followed by the yardarm, vertical ladder and etched radar aerial which will need some careful folding to keep everything square. The supporting rear poles of the tripod for the foremast are slid into position to the rear of the bridge structure. The fore pole fitted on top of the bridge, with the large starfish platform, (made entirely of etched parts), fixed to the top of the three poles. The spotting top is fitted onto the starfish platform along with the mast and Type 281 aerial as per the mainmast assembly. With the masts fitted into place, the 4”, 15” turrets can be fitted, as are the forward quad pom pom mounts and foredeck mounted 40mm units. Sundry items, such as the foredeck derricks, Jack Staff and Ensign Staff, ships boats, boat booms, accommodation ladders and quarterdeck derricks are attached. Finally the boat davits, acoustic hammer, (actually removed in 1945), hammer derrick and ships railings are fitted, thus completing the build. Decals The small decal sheet provides just two types of White Ensign, one wavy and one straight. Conclusion I really am quite disappointed with this kit. It had so much promise on opening the box, but Trumpeter has once again snatched defeat from the jaws of victory. The hull, especially the extended bulge seems to have been made by the same team that made, and mucked up the same area, that designed their HMS Warspite. That flaw and the fact that the hull appears to be too shallow overall, but mostly under the waterline makes the whole ship look wrong in its proportions. The twin 20mm mounts and single 40mm Bofors, according to my references, were only fitted to the Roberts in 1945, yet the acoustic hammer was removed, (although the derrick was retained), in the refit before sailing to the Far East. If you want to build HMS Roberts as per her time at Salerno or on D-Day, at the very least you will also need to find some single 20mm mounts to replace the 40mm, another Type 282 director and pair of searchlights, which is a shame really, as the boxart shows her during her bombardment of France during D-Day. Recommended with the above caveats. Review sample courtesy of UK Distributors for
  22. Hi all, Here's my latest completion, Trumpeter's 1/700 kit of the Frunze with some of the WEM etch for the type. Paints are WEM Russian Northern Fleet Grey and Deck Red with Humbrol for the rest. Like the Ki-67 "Peggy" I posted in the Aircraft RFI section, I've had this kit in the stash for ages (released in 2003/04) but never made much headway with it. I actually built the kit as a side project to the RNZAF Dauntless I posted back in March, but it's taken this long to get the paint work done! Comments welcome! Mike.
  23. Here's my last completion for 2014, Trumpeter's 1/700 scale model of the HMS Barham modified to represent the ship at the time of the Battle of Cape Matapan. Colourcoats used for the AP507B and AP507C camouflage pattern with Teak and AP507A used for the decks and the RN White for the stripe on the mainmast and blast bags. WEM's etch for the kit was also used, although I substituted Quad Pom Poms for the Octuples on the bridge structure using photos as reference. The modifications to change from as sunk to Matapan condition mainly consisted of changing the platform on "B" turret to have an UP projector instead of the quad '50 and leaving off the forward AA platform that was also mounted on "B" turret as well as the one on "Y" turret. The Walrus was painted using Humbrol enamels and actually has the countershading on the lower wing as per the biplane version of the Temperate Sea Scheme. The roundels were sourced from Tamiya's 1/700 Repulse as the kit supplied ones were too big (1/350?) and the wrong style. Before painting: Walrus: After painting: As always, comments and criticism welcome! Mike.
  24. Dear Fellow Modellers Here is the Chinese CA-30 truck which is a clone of the Soviet Zil-151. The design owes much to the lend-lease Studebacker trucks from WWII. It was in service in China from 1960s to 1980s and I believe some still serve in the Bangladesh army. In the Vietnam war they chugged down the Ho chi Minh trail and so made a major part in the eventual victory of the Communists. It is dressed up with Miniarm resin wheels and SKP lamps and lenses. Trumpeter provide a canvas tilt but omit the cover on the front so this was added from tissue. Hope you like it? Andrew
  25. Dear Fellow Modellers A few photos of my Trumpeter T-64. Whilst we in the UK were fighting to get the opposed piston 2 stroke L60 to work in the Chieftain, ironically the Russians were having awful trouble getting their similar engine to work in the T-64. In the case of the 5TD engine the cylinders are horizontal so helping the ultra-low profile of the tank. These tanks were amongst the main protagonists in the terrible Ukrainian conflict. Hope you like? Andrew
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