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Graham Boak

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About Graham Boak

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  1. DC 2K AX 767 colours

    Point taken, but the other photo isn't on ortho film. I suspect that the serial is just appearing lighter because it is thinner, and the camouflage is over-riding the impression. At least you can see the blue on the wing roundel in this photo.
  2. RAF Dark Green 1942

    I've never been convinced by that saying, as it seems to bear no relation to my experience of working in factories devoted to military.government work. It seems like a lazy excuse for shoddy work, that somehow would slip through the inspection procedures. Wishful thinking. Although I wasn't around at the time, it seems especially unlikely when applied to the regulation-ridden, closely inspected work done in aircraft factories during wartime. That doesn't mean that shortcuts weren't taken at times, with some recorded lapses in build standards. As for paints, shortages in key ingredients could affect the colours provided, and certainly the same colour of paint supplied from different factories might well differ somewhat, and certainly could and would fade differently. I entirely agree that your modelling should be done to meet your own standards and willingness to make an effort in any particular area, but I've never seen that as being the same thing as avoiding all care and attention to the original, where the information does exist..
  3. RAF Dk.Green camouflage color

    The RAF Blue Grey on the vehicles is the pre-war colour, and will have been painted over in 1939. RAF vehicles obeyed the same rules as the Army, so at the start of the war they will have had a base colour of G3 Khaki Green with a disruptive patter, largely horizontal, of the darker G5 Dark Green - if the latter was applied. Midway through the war this was replaced by SCC2 Service Brown, then by April 1945 by SCC15 Olive Drab, greener than the US Olive Drab. All upper surfaces should have been darker than the base colour, with various colours used - SCC1A Dark Brown, Tarmac, Blue-Black - as the war proceeded, with various disruptive patterns. The SCC15 was applied overall, but this is unlikely to have been common on RAF vehicles - the official instruction was paint nothing unless you had to, even if the rules had changed. So ok, by 1945 there would be some. These colours are available from Colourcoats: a fuller (and more useful) description can be found from Mike Starmer's research and books, but initially see the MAFVA site http://www.mafva.net/other pages/Starmer camo.htm The aircraft wouldn't be painted all the same colours, given that the Spitfire Mk.1 and the (majority of ) Hurricanes will have left frontline service before the Lancaster and Mosquito entered service. So here again It rather depends just which year you are modelling, and indeed which variant of the Mosquito - a bomber, nightfighter or PR? You would not normally find all these types on the same station, but of course there were visitors. By mid-war the Lancaster would be in Temperate Land colours of Dark Green and Dark Earth over Night, the fighters and the Mosquito bomber would be in Day Fighter colours of Dark Green and Ocean Grey over Medium Sea Grey. Mossie night fighters would be in Medium Sea Grey overall with Dark Green disruptive over the upper surfaces and sides, with PRU Mossies in PRU Blue overall.
  4. DC 2K AX 767 colours

    I don't see why the N should be red, and looking at the photo it appears darker than the red centre of the roundel. I would also go with red/blue roundels above the wing, unless there was good evidence otherwise. I'm not clear about the position of the Union Flag in the top artwork. This is reminiscent of the way the flag was flown from British civil aircraft prewar, but the DC-2K is a military transport. It seems unlikely that such courtesies were carried out in wartime anyway - except perhaps from a BOAC aircraft on arrival in a neutral civil airport?
  5. I don't see why the N should be red, and looking at the photo it appears darker than the red centre of the roundel. I would also go with red/blue roundels above the wing, unless there was good evidence otherwise. I'm not clear about the position of the Union Flag in the top artwork. This is reminiscent of the way the flag was flown from British civil aircraft prewar, but the DC-2K is a military transport. It seems unlikely that such courtesies were carried out in wartime anyway - except perhaps from a BOAC aircraft on arrival in a neutral civil airport?
  6. Am I Screwed?

    Blunt is fine, but possibly slightly pessimistic, though it is difficult to think myself back to my absolute beginning in the late '50s. However, I'm sure that I made kits then which nowadays would be considered terribly crude and ill-fitting, and difficult enough to warn off any new starter. Memory says that were quite fun. (I was however a lot younger than 23.) That aside, I think the criticism is probably true of the early AModel kits but not necessarily the current ones. Standard tools such as knife and files are perfectly adequate. As to being too difficult, that rather depends on you rather than the kit, and forewarned is forearmed. Modelling is very difficult if you set your heart on competition standards, but much less so if you remember it is supposed to be fun. I must admit I don't think that large twin transports are ideal subjects for a first kit, and from what John says neither is the I-16, but the old Italeri La.5FN is perfectly suitable for a beginner. One thing I think I can guarantee - if you try selling them then you won't get anything like the price you paid for them. Which is true regardless of how good they are or are not. The second-hand model market has a few high-level collectors (and these kits won't qualify for them) but is dominated by people only interested in a cheap bargain. If you do decide to look for something easier for now, stick these kits into a box for later consideration. Perhaps haul them out now and again for the sake of giving them a trial - there's no shame in having kits hanging around for years, or even decades, inching towards the light. They may even rise a little in value, but I wouldn't rely upon that. I'd also point out that if you don't try something beyond your current ability, your abilities will never improve, but perhaps you do need to gain some experience first. Another approach for us on the board is to consider which kits are suitable for beginners and make recommendations. To be honest if Eastern European kits are to be ruled out because of fear/lack of confidence then the answer is Not Many. So here's a short list to begin with, not all readily available: Hasegawa or Heller Yak 3 Italeri/Xvezda or Hobby Boss Pe 2 Plastikart/Revell Il 4 (a bit difficult) Tamiya or Academy Il 2 Hobby Boss Tu 2 Hasegawa I-16 Heller I-153 Airfix Pe 2 is a bit vague on variant but decent enough for a beginner. Their Yak 9 and Il2 however are pretty awful in shape: not too difficult but you wouldn't really want to. Perhaps also the Valom Yak 7, but once you dip into the Eastern European ranges then there are quite a lot that can be considered.
  7. Wellington XIV

    It's fair to point out that some aircraft (though generally larger ones than the Wellington) retained the two colours of the TSS on the uppersurfaces long after the introduction of the EDSG-only uppersurfaces, despite the raising of the white to the required height. I can see other parts of what could be a 2-colour pattern, on the wing and on the top of the fuselage, so suggest checking these areas against the pattern and seeing if they coincide or not. What you are seeing on the wing are the red centres of the roundels. The blue on top of the wings often fades, as does the EDSG, so there is little contrast between the outer ring of the roundel and the camouflage colour(s)..
  8. Wheel-well colours - BoB Spitfire, Hurricane, & Defiant

    Assuming that the sideview of Biter was taken at the same time as that of the fleet carrier with Biter in the background. If the fleet carrier is Indomitable, then the photo has to be before Operation Husky. Indomitable was torpedoed on the 16th July and returned to the US for repairs.
  9. RAF CC Liberator rocket installations

    Agreed it is a trolley, but a very unusual one. It appears to have a wide lower "tray" carrying three rocket rails, and then tapering side supports to what? Why park it where it is if the rails weren't intended to go there? I suspect the boxes are behind, out of the starboard side of the aircraft, rather than associated with the trolley.
  10. Hurricanes to the fore!

    Both Hasegawa kits are the right length for a Mk.II. If you care, shorten the fuselage pieces rather than the engine cowling. I think that the Finns did have a single Mk.II, but it was ex-Russian.
  11. RAF CC Liberator rocket installations

    Touches of boiler-plate about that beauty. I didn't notice at first what appears to be a belly pack with three more rocket launched, sitting in the ground behind the nosewheel. I saw the hellcat's mainwheel, but in front of that the rear fuselage and tailwheel looks more like something off a Japanese aircraft. Too much glare for me to identify it, any ideas?
  12. Wheel-well colours - BoB Spitfire, Hurricane, & Defiant

    There were a number of photographs of Seafires taken on HMS Indomitable when she was working up following her return from the US (after damage on Op Pedestal). This would be very early in 1943. As you say, three of the photos show Seafires (or the same one?) with Sky Blue under the nose, whereas the one behind in the last photo has Sky. There has been a suggestion that this is linked to the removal of chin filters, but this isn't totally convincing. However the actual air intake does appear dark on both Sky Blue and Sky aircraft, so something has been going on in this area.
  13. RAF Dk.Green camouflage color

    The Dark Green looks OK if maybe a little light (model to photo to reproduction on my monitor) but the Dark Earth looks far too dark. Is this for another thread?
  14. 1/72 Keilkraft Hurricane IIC

    I'll bet it has the narrow top to the nose, common to all early Hurricane kits. However the only fault I can actually remember is that the retractable undercarriage means that it looks very odd if assembled undercarriage down, because the real Hurricane undercarriage is more complex than a simple hinge.
  15. Am I Screwed?

    Thanks John, but you are too kind about that obese distortion. Yes, it should go together easily enough and once bought I guess you (Coutinho) are stuck with it, but it can't be recommended. Treat it as a paint mule - just think of all the learning to do about Soviet camouflages and model paint availabilities!
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