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Julien

Walkaround Coordinator
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Julien last won the day on July 13 2013

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About Julien

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    Excellente Spazzatrice
  • Birthday 01/01/00

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    The Far Side

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  1. Agree, they are not doing it any favours. NMF does not help either, probably looks better after a quick sand and some paint.
  2. Latest Walkaround Updates

    Additional F-86A pics added today. http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/77141-north-american-f-86a-sabre/ Julien
  3. North American F-86A Sabre

    North American F-86A Sabre 48-0242 at Midland Air Museum. This is an early F-86A which features the covers over the gun troughs which were deleted on all later models. Pics mine.
  4. A-4E Skyhawk 1:48 Hobby Boss The Douglas A-4 Skyhawk was a carrier capable ground attack aircraft developed for the US Navy and US Marine Corps. It is a delta winged single engine aircraft. It was developed by the Douglas Aircraft Company originally under the A4D designation, latter changed to A-4. The A-4 was designed by Ed Heinemann to a 1952 US Navy specification for a carrier based attack aircraft capable of carrying heavy loads. For this an aircraft was to have a maximum weight of 30,000Lbs, and be capable of speeds up to 495mph. Initially the Douglas design with a specified weight of only 20000 Lbs was greeted with scepticism. Ed Heinemann had in fact designed a very small aircraft. This was to be roughly half the weight of its contemporaries. In fact the wings were so short they did not need to fold for stowage below decks. Having a non-folding wing eliminated the heavy wing folds seen in other aircraft, one reason for a low overall weight. The prototype also exceed the maximum speed the US Navy had specified. In fact not long after the aircraft would set a new world record of 695mph for circuit flying, bettering the specification by 200mph. The A-4A was the initial production aircraft with 166 being built. The A-4B was ordered with additional improvements over the initial design. These were to be; Stronger rudder construction, a pressure fuelling system incorporating a probe for in-flight refuelling, external fuel tanks, stronger landing gear, additional navigation equipment, an improved ordnance delivery system, and an external buddy refuelling package. A total of 542 A-4Bs were to be made with fleet deliveries beginning in 1957 only a year after the first A-4B flight was made. The A-4C would then follow giving an all weather capability with the AN/APG-53 radar, a new auto pilot and bombing system and a more powerful J65-W-20 engine. The E model was a major upgrade to previous aircraft included a new Pratt & Whitney J-52-P-6A engine with 8400 lbs of thrust. The air-frame was strengthened and two more weapons pylons were added. Improved avionics were installed including a TACAN, doppler system, radar altimeter, and a bombing computer. Later an even more powerful J52-P-8 with 93000 lbs thrust was added. The E would then see the addition of a dorsal hump on the fuselage spine to house extra electronics as appeared on the later A-4F. The Kit This a new tool from Hobby Boss of this famous Douglas aircraft. The kit itself is on three sprues is fairly simple much like the real thing. Construction starts in the cockpit you will be surprised to know! The two part Escapac seat is put together and placed into the cockpit tub after the aft wall is installed. The seat is fairly basic and there are no belts included in the model. The control column is then installed along with the instrument panel (details by decal), this is followed by the area just behind the seat. The completed cockpit is then installed onto the top of the front wheel well along with the rudder pedals. Next up the wings are completed. This is standard single part lower wing with left & right uppers. Once complete it is placed to one side. Construction then moves to the main fuselage. The completed cockpit assembly and the intake duct are installed in the main fuselage as it is closed up. The avionics hump or the top fuselage fairing are installed depending on which decal option is being modelled. Two side intakes are added along with the main wing assembly. Two small parts then need to be removed from the tail. Lastly the engine exhaust is added along with a rear underside panel. Next up the left and right engine intakes are assembled and added to the main fuselage. The instrument coaming and HUD are added to the cockpit and the 20mm cannons & fairings are added to each side. Two small fairings are added to the rear fuselage. The all moving tails are made u (conventional upper & lower construction) and added, along with the air brakes. The canopy is added along with two strakes just above the cannon barrels. The underwing/fuselage pylons are then made up and added along with the gear doors. The front undercarriage leg is added which has the nose wheel moulded on to it. The rear legs and retraction struts are added along with the wheels. To round things off the arrestor hook and til bumper are added. Weapons Hobby Boss aren't known for being stingy with these, and as you'd expect there are plenty to choose from, infact 5 sprues in this kit are devoted to underwing stores. As always, check your references for likely load-outs if you are going for accuracy, or slap them all on if not. It's your choice! Included are; 12 x Mk.82 Bombs 12 x Mk.20 CBUs 2 x AiM-9B Sidewinders 2 x Wing tanks 1 x Centreline tank Sway braces are provided where needed, as are launch rails and multiple ejector racks. There are other weapons on the sprues not used here so good for the spares box. The back page of the instruction booklet shows the pylon positions of the various options, but as above, check things over before you proceed. Stencil locations are shown on a separate colour page, with positions and colours all called out. Markings Hobby Boss often supply only one option with their kits, but this one has two, one is documented incorrectly, the other is not. It is really about time HB started giving some information about its decal schemes in the kits rather than modellers going on-line to work it out themselves. The decals are printed in house, and are of good quality. 150056 VC-1 US Navy - No data is provided but the box art is very similar to an image from 1972 from NAS Barbers Point, Oahu,HI 151074 VA-155 USS Constellation 1966 wearing experimental 3 tone camo. Note this aircraft did not have the dorsal hump despite the painting instructions showing it. Now preserved at Naval Air Facility Atsugi Conclusion This is a nice new tool of the A-4E from Hobby Boss. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  5. ATAC or Airborne Tactical Advantage Compnay who supply adversaries to the US DOD for training have snapped up 63 F.1s from the French for 21 million Euros! Looks like they plans to return 30 to 40 back to flight status. https://theaviationgeekclub.com/atac-bought-63-mirage-f1-fighter-jets/ Might get some interesting schemes on them like the other aircraft they operate. Julien
  6. I read it on the internet so it must be true!
  7. IAI Kfir C2/C7 1:72 AvantGarde Model Kits The Kfir (lion cub) is an Israeli development based on the Mirage 5, and can trace it roots back to the Mirage IIIC adapted for Israeli use successfully as a Mach 2 all-weather interceptor with success, but they felt it lacked the loiter time that would be needed if a ground-attack role was to be added its task list. As a result of an arms embargo, Israel built the Nesher, which was then improved further and was suitably different to be renamed as the Kfir. It entered service in 1975, and was almost immediately superseded in the air superiority role when the first F-15s arrived from America. The C2 variant added more swept canards, dog-tooth leading edges to the wings and strakes under the nose, while the C7 had more hard-points added under the air intakes, a new engine with more thrust, in-flight refuelling probe, plus many upgrades to the avionics, which includes HOTAS capabilities. It continued in service into the late 90s, after which it was replaced by more modern aircraft. The aircraft has been sold to Ecuador, Columbia and Sri Lanka, though all have had to be approved by the US as it uses a licence built J79 engine. During the late 1980s the US Marine Corps & US Navy leased 25 C1 version for adversary training designating them the F-21 Lion. The Kit This is an eagerly awaited new kit from AMK. On opening the box it does not disappoint. The plastic is crisp with fine recessed panel lines. All weapons get there own sprue and there are a generous five decal options covering Israeli, Civilian, and foreign military users. Before construction starts the modeller needs to decide if they are doing a C2 or C7. Construction starts naturally enough with the cockpit, the cockpit tub is built up from the main tub, read bulkhead, instrument panel (instruments provided as decal) and the panel coaming. The front gear bay is then built up, this is un the underside of the cockpit. Once this is built up it can be installed into the main fuselage. An engine mounting part is then installed and the main fuselage can be closed up. Note before doing so the two central american versions require some slots to be opened up in the tail. Attention now moves to the main wing. Holes need to be opened up in the lower one part wing to accommodate the weapons pylons etc. These are version specific so ensure you open the right ones. The main undercarriage bay is now built up and added into the lower wing. The upper wings can then be added (left & right) and the whole wing assembly added to the main fuselage. The intakes can then be added to both sides of the fuselage along with the canards which mount to them. We then move on to the undercarriage. The main wheels are built up from a two part tyre with a central hub. They are added to their legs and retraction struts added along with the doors. The font leg is then also built up. The main leg and strut are one part with the wheel and a few other bits being added. this can then be installed along with its doors. A panel behind the nose is then added, here again there are two choices for both models. The nose cone is then added, here again there are different lumps and bumps depending on the variant. Moving to the rear, antenna are added to the fin and if making either Central American version then additional parts are added. The engine is a five part affair which is then made up and installed, along with a ventral fairing at the rear. We then move swiftly back to the cockpit and build up & install the ejection seat. Two different versions are supplied for the two different variants. Once installed the canopies can be fitted and the nose probe. The last thing to do is install the weapons load and pylons. Python-3 missiles, MK.82 bombs, GBU-12s, Griffin LGBs are all supplied along with a centre line tank, and two wing fuel tanks. Pylons and sway braces are provided as needed. Markings There are there are a generous five options. All decals appear in register, colour dense, and with a minimum of carrier film. The five options supplied are; C2 #874, 101 Tajeset Israeli AF (Two tone grey) C7 #543 "Zohar" The Arava Guardians Sqn, Israeli AF (Green/Brown/Sand) C2 N401AX, Airborne Tactical Advantage Company (ATAC), USA C3 905, 2113 Sqn Ecuadorian AF C7 111 Sqn Colombian AF Conclusion An excellent new tool Kfir from AMK. Highly recommended. Available from all good model shops online and in the high street. Review sample courtesy of
  8. Airfix 2018

    As long as its the Hawker one, I would buy that!
  9. Meng Leopard 2A4 Agdus Training system

    Great details, thanks. I like the way the wires are taped to the side of the tank!
  10. Latest Walkaround Updates

    Canberra PR.3 pics added today; http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235028022-english-electric-canberra-pr3/ Julien
  11. English Electric Canberra PR.3 WF922 at Midland Air Museum, pics mine.
  12. Model 239 Buffalo "Taivaan Helmi over Findland" 1:48 Special Hobby The Buffalo was designed by the Brewster Aeronautical Corporation in 1935 a US Navy requirement for a carrier based fighter to replace the Grumman F3F Biplane. As such it was one of the first US monoplane fighters. The prototype first flew in 1937 with deliveries commencing in 1939. Brewster had production difficulties and only 11 of the early F2A-1 aircraft were delivered to the USN with the remainder of the order being diverted to the Finnish Air Force. The US Navy and Marine Corps would order and receive the later F2A-2 and F2A-3 models although it was realised by this time that the Buffalo was no match for more modern fighters. It had been suggested that the later orders were just to keep the Brewster factories running, in fact they would later go on to produce Corsairs and other aircraft for the USN. Overseas Finland ordered the aircraft in 1939, the aircraft being assembled by SAAB in Sweden. The Finnish after initial doubts liked the aircraft. The cooler weather in Finland solved overheating problems with the engine, and the aircraft went on to become a success with 477 Soviet aircraft being destroyed for only 19 Buffalos. Belgium had ordered the aircraft but only one was delivered before the country fell to the advancing Germans. Their order was subsequently transferred to the British. The British facing a shortage of combat aircraft purchased the Buffalo. The original assessment by the RAF was not brilliant. The aircraft lacked pilot armour, was under gunned, had poor altitude performance and there were issues with overheating, maintenance and controls. The UK still ordered 170 aircraft which were sent to Australia, New Zealand and the RAF. The aircraft were initially sent out to the Far East. The aircraft were plagued with reliability problems in the hot climate, performance was poor, and the pilots did not have adequate training on the aircraft. Given all these problems and the superior numbers of Japanese aircraft the Buffalos did not fair that well. Some did escape to the Dutch East Indies where they would join those operated by the Netherlands East Indian Army. In Finnish service the aircraft arrived too late for the winter war but did take oart in the continuation war. The Finnish pilots like the Buffalo and called it Taivaan Heli "The Haven Pearl". Many pilots would become aces flying it with H Wind scoring 39 of his total 75 victories flying the Buffalo. With the arrival of Bf 109s the Buffalos were considered obselete but they fought untill the end of the continuation war, with the last battles being against their former allay of Germany. They were retired from service in 1948. The Kit Even in 1:48 this is a small aircraft. The kit is the original Classic Airframes molding and so is mixed media with injected plastic, resin and photo etched parts. In a break from tradition construction starts not with the cockpit but with the wheel wells inside the wings. The resin wells are placed inside the wings before they can be assembled. Luckily tradition resurfaces with the wings as the are conventional single part lower, and left & right uppers. A ventral pnael is also installed under the main wings at this time. The gun front gunbay/wheelbay is then made up, this sits between the cockpit and the engine. The rear bulkhead forms the front of the cockpit, and the front bulkhead the engine firewall. The top of the compartment forms the gun bay with the guns and ammo boxes, and the lower part the main gear retraction parts. Once made up it can be installed in the completed wing section. The cockpit fllor is then installed on the rear, and the engine and its mounts on the front. The cockpit floor parts are then installed on this section as well. Moving on to the main fuselage the rear cockpit bulkhead, rear shelf behind the pilot and the tail wheel area are all installed into the right fuselage. This is then installed onto the wing section. All the cockpit parts including the seat, instrument panel, controls etc are then installed onto the cockpit. The main fuselage can then be closed up. The tail cone, tail planes and engine cowl front can then be added. The framing for the area behind the cockpit is then added. The modeller can now move onto the landing gear. The tailwheel needs the moulded wheel removing from the housing and the correct wheel added on. The left & right main gear weels are added to the legs, the retraction struts added and then they can go into the fuselage. The outer doors are then added. To finish off the canopies and propeller are added along with the a few aerial and other small parts. Markings Markings for 4 aircraft are provided. The decals are by Cartograf so should post no problems. The Finnish markings are in two parts for obvious reasons. BW-393, Pilot Hans Wind, Finlands Top scoring ace with 75 victories, 39 in Buffalos, 1/LLv.24, Suulajarvi, April 1943 BW-393, Pilot Kni Eino Luukhanen, He marked his victories with Lahden Erikois beer bottle labels stuck to the fin. 1/LLv.24, Suulajarvi, Nov 1942 BW-378, Pilot Kni Per-Erik Sovellius, Otto Werde was painted under the canopy for Swedish Baron Hugo Hamilton who raised funds for the aircraft. 4/LLv.24, Lunkula, Herbst/Winter 1941 Conclusion Even though this kit is an older one now the parts are still good and the model should build up to a good looking aircraft in markings you dont see to often. Recomended. Review sample courtesy of
  13. Christmas menu

    I am quite partial to a curry and a kebab, just not both together; and certainly not a Christmass.
  14. Hurricane coming tomorrow

    Dont worry I checked with this guy and he says no hurricane
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