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Texian

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  • Content count

    37
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13 Good

About Texian

  • Rank
    Newbie
  • Birthday 26/06/55

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    East Texas
  • Interests
    Military history & aviation, shooting, fishing
  1. Only now, you have to find air crew for the 'Moth! Sounds like a vicious (or delightful depending your point of view) circle. Might be time for a diorama with it sitting quietly on the hardstand awaiting the day's activity... maybe with a tarp over the cockpits?
  2. Gad-ZOOKS! There be some dust on this here old topic! (5Years Let's see if I can knock some of it off. Howdy. Nice little review, thank you. I am fixing to try this one myself. One curious discrepancy between your and my kit is that mine is molded in dark blue/gray plastic, not the color you described. One bright ray however. You wrote; As it happens, Eduard has this same aircraft in a "ProfiPACK" version which has among it's extra goodies a multi-color instruction sheet which in fact DOES show the rigging in different color from the basic black/gray. The good news is it's available on line in pdf. I printed out the desired pages. Here's a link to it... It also shows the extra detail such as the correct seat which has holes in it. Such can be drilled through the 'Week end" edition's solid back rest. Likely other details as well. My biggest gripe is the color scheme on this which doesn't impress me at all. Frankly, I wouldn't have bought this individually. What I did was find a couple or three kits I wanted in a lot of 8 on Ebay. I made an offer and got a deal on them. I pulled the ones I wanted and listed the others individually. I got my money back anyway but this one nobody wanted.I decided to use this to experiment some modeling techniques on it. I'll do some posting on it as I get along. (I'm not very fast either!)
  3. Try looking for old kits. There are always some on ebay and here's a site I have found the occasional old kit on... http://www.oldmodelkits.com/
  4. Oh well. Like I said, it was just a thought. I wondered if it had been thought of before and it is no surprise to me that it was. As for the finish texture, you're right of course. I never expected it would "look real" I was thinking more in the line of just not looking like plastic. But, being a typical American, a Heinz 57 blood line, you know, a "mutt" (specifically, I'm mostly Hrvat with some German, Irish and English mixed in) and hardheaded to boot, I still have to give it a try just to get it out of my system.
  5. I am working on an old model of a Fokker D-VI and I know that the inside cockpit "fabric" should show a faint lozenge cammo pattern used by the Germans at the time. This is an old Eduard kit from the 90s I think, but there's no decal for that. So I got to thinking (a dangerous thing, that ) what I might could do about that, Had a brain storm and came up with this. Copying and printing the cammo onto tissue paper! I reasoned the tissue paper might not want to track through the printer very well so what I did was to cut the sheet about legal length and fold the excess over the end of a standard paper sheet. Went through that machine like going through a goose. Here's an image of what I got. Weelll no, there won't be an image of what I got. It seems there's a major cyber or some such attack going on right now that has disrupted photobucket (among many others) and I don't know of any other way to post an image here so we'll just have to go with what we've got. One problem is that the cammo samples I have copied so far are too bright and bold for the interior. Now, I have the cammo pattern from a Siemens- Schuckert that is known to be considerably washed out so I copied those as well. They might do though I'll have to do a little research to see if they would be appropriate for my D-VI. But, yet another thought occurs. I can scan or photograph a decal set and fade them all I want in my photo software (in this case "Irfanview"). Now. I know some models have side detailing going on inside the fuselages but, tissue paper can easily be trimmed so as to appear to be on the 'outside' of such features. Then yet another thought occurs. I wonder if perhaps such printed stuff might not make an excellent total cover for surfaces such as wings. Might not the texture of the tissue make convincing surface treatment for a WWI fabric covered wing even after clear coating? I'm interested in you alls thoughts on this and barring accusations of total lunacy (which might not be too far off at that) I might just give these thoughts a try. What's to lose? It's not a fancy high-brow or expensive model. Right?
  6. I don't have any right now and we'll have to wait and see what the future offers. I only just recently became aware of this model line. I am thrillingly impressed by what I see. Unfortunately, many are sold out and I really am not interested enough in what they have left to pay the price they want for them.
  7. What's wrong with a little keeping it simple? it is sharp looking and well made. As another member said, a "neat and tidy build." I quite agree. I like it.
  8. Thanks Malpaso. That answers my question.
  9. A question from and for the ignorant. (Me that is.) What, eggzackly, is "strut stock?" Ok, yeah. I mean I figure it's something to make struts out of. But first of all, are we talking about plastic model stuff, stick and tissue, what? I ask because it would seem to me that card stock or balsa or spruce wood do for the other. If round is desired, there are sprues, stretchable to many configurations or if wood, dowels or various bamboo 'skewers' which lend themselves nicely for fine wood construction. Is it possible you all are referring to scale operational struts as in oleo strut? I'm at the point of, 'what else is there?' which brings me to my question. Bear with me please and thanks.
  10. ...existed! Everybody knows the major WWI fighter planes; Spad, Albatross, Nieuport, SE5a, Pfalz, and of course, Fokker's many well known contributions. Of that fruitful designer's list, the EIII, Dr1, DVII and DVIII immediately come to mind. But, I recently started building models again after a hiatus of about 40 years and have suddenly, it seems, become aware of aircraft I never imagined. For the letter/numbers of Fokker I just assumed (Yeah, I should have known better) they represented designs that just never made or even just never were. So now I find out there were actual flying production aircraft, however few be it, such as EI, BII; DI, DII, DIII, & DIV; DV, DVI. After all, there was a CI, basically a two seater DVII it never saw service in WWI but was still a product of it first flying before the armistice in 1918. Then too, there's the Sieman Schukert DI, DII, DIII, & DIV I started out with an intention to ultimately build each of Ernst Udet's known aircraft/color schemes and yet will. But, it might be nice to have a collection of each of Fokker's planes then maybe the SSW series too. It would probably take some altering and scratch building along the way. (And as slow as I'm going, this will likely never really come to pass but at least I can consider it.) Anybody know of any other little known fighter craft of the major powers keeping it to, say, France, England & Germany? re the "DDoS and Brute Force Attacks" I cannot even imagine why anyone would want to do such to a quiet, apolitical modelers site. I hope it all comes out ok!
  11. Dobar Dan! And that about uses up my (friendly at least) repertoire of Hrvatska. I'm from Texas but Grampa was from a small village in Croatia called Guci in the Draganic region I believe it was (is). But he left the "Old Country" for America in 1911. So here we are. I am mostly into military models, basically only picking it up again after a hiatus of about 40 years (I'm 60 now). I agree about liking this site. Seems like good commentary with an absence of a lolt of the garbage so prevalent on some site. Though but another newby myself, I gladly offer my humble welcome to you. Jim
  12. I came back to look at this again and caught this... Since I am going to have both kits, I don't see why I can't just swap the decals. Simple and cheap solution. Then I sell off the unused kit (noting the decal swap of course.)
  13. Thanks! But, in all honesty, it is more a matter of luck than cleverness. Whjo could have planned for a hardware part to so perfectly fit a model part?!
  14. Thanks! These are what I am looking for- generalizations- just to get an idea what goes on. Then it becomes easier to track down m ore accurate tutorials. One thing that helps is having figured out how to watch You-tube on the TV, (Do you all still (or did you ever actually) call a television a "telly"?)
  15. Hi y'all. I have already placed and intro. This is more of a request for an update in techniques. I was an avid model builder back in the 1960s and some into the 70s. I have built few since then. I am recently getting back into it with an itch to build all of Udet's known color schemes from WWI among some other era models. I mostly build plastic kits though now and again I will crank out a balsa kit too. (I have a dandy "Hurri" waiting on the shelf). But, I'm wondering about some modern techniques I have recently read about. Or, maybe they aren't 'modern' and I just never picked up on them. But, in High School I read every months issue of some modeling mag the school library got among others along the way and I think I would remember if these were around then. Whatever the case... Examples. This "masking" business. Now, I get masking clear parts for canopy frames and such like. But, I see masking sheets for WWI aircraft which have precious little clear parts. Also, like in a Spitfire model I have there's obviously more masking than the canopy would require. What all is it used on? Just how would you go about marking it for use? A BIG question is about decals. I have read about people applying future floor wax, spraying different lacquers, and there are a number of decal solutions sold. The whole thing is positively mind numbing! Back in the day, you just dipped them in warm water and slid them on. (Well, a little more to it than that but, not much.) At the moment, I am mostly concerned with aviation models but I do have a tank waiting too. That's a couple things that come to mind for starters. If I should have asked this elsewhere, my apologies and please direct me to the correct place. Thanks all!