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Showing most liked content on 19/11/15 in all areas

  1. My Monogram B17G has been sitting in my stash for about ten years, but after getting Robert Stitt’s superb book on the Coastal Command B17 Fortress it inspired me to have a go at the conversion to a version as used in Britain. New props and nose glazing, surgery to the nose section as well as various scratch built radar aerials, plus other bits and pieces completed the change to a Fortress IIA. The Temperate Sea scheme finish on the upper surface was slightly faded and weathered because these aircraft were subject to severe weather conditions on ops over the North Sea. The model represents a 206 Sqn. machine with British-designed Yagi homing aerials in the nose and wings and American-designed search aerials on the rear fuselage. It was based at Benbecula, Outer Hebrides from late 1942. Cheers.
    23 likes
  2. Here is another of my occasional 1/48 builds, the Eduard Messerschmitt Bf109G6. A lot has been posted online about the accuracy of this kit and building it alongside 2 other 109s the difference in size is instantly apparent. As a 109 fan I was rather disappointed initially but once I started building that disappointment all but vanished as the kit is a delight to build with superb detail inside and on the surface so it's portliness is forgiven on this occasion. Other than sand off the strange bumps at the wing root everything else is OOB including the strange undercarriage leg angle. I painted this one as Major Franzisket's aircraft as the other decal options all have some issues, several were ERLA built G6s so should have had the extra cowl bulges on the right side but Eduard didn't include them and one of the options colour schemes is actually a mixture of 2 aircraft from different factories. I've gone a bit overboard with the weathering as the photos I've seen showed this aircraft to be very clean, I'll put it down to artist licence. Duncan B
    19 likes
  3. Revells 1/48 Apache done as a Brit. I found some nice pics of a dusty one, presubably in use in the middle east somewhere, which looked more interesting than a straight green, so this had a sand wash with added pigments over the tamiya paint to liven it up. Used the Heritage conversion parts and Attack Squardron Hellfires and pylons. Nice missiles but its a shame the pylons dont have the wiring detail on them as its a pain to add. Had to print my own decals to make them look like brit hellfires too. wired up the gun, rear rotor, and radome, and added the prominent rivets to the radome with lead wire, and used lenses from little cars for the seeker heads and tv cameras. There is no wip for this as it wasnt for a GB, and as its nothing special i didnt bother. Shame really as it was quite good fun adding all the bits and bobs. There are a few more pics plus the full res pics available on flickr if you have bad eyesight
    17 likes
  4. Hi everyone I know it's a bit of a 'what if' really, but it was very ,very nearly built, in fact I spoke to a chap who worked for EE under Petter and his team ( I move in exalted circles don't you know ) and he told me it was a lot nearer being built than has previously been mentioned !! .Sorry 'bout this , but it's going to be a long one , here's my first attempt at a full blown scratch-build using only a toilet roll, brown paper , sticky back plastic, some beads and a bottle of Copydex !!. Actually this is hopefully the first of many experimental aircraft that I hope to build over the coming year representing types that only got as far as the planning stage.This first one is the English Electric study EAG.3280 , known as the P42. The idea was for a hypersonic aircraft capable of flying at around Mach 4.5 using conventional engines , Spey RB 168's in fact and employing compression lift as a means of attaining these speeds for short periods of time. No ramjets for this little baby ! (bear in mind this was the mid 50's a good 10 years before the XB-70 flew !!). The main problem was obviously one of kinetic heating so some pretty exotic materials were to be used in it's construction , including gold , titanium and a special thermally enhanced magnesium, all of which had to be developed at enormous cost to the British taxpayer. Due to cost and much other work going on at EE ( Lightning mostly), the idea was shelved , though it did appear once again in the early 60's , this time as the basis of a low orbit satellite launcher (with a widened fuselage to take the new payload). Onto the model then, I based it on drawings found in Tony Buttlers fantastic' British Secret Projects' , Hypersonics book. These were scaled up to 72nd and transferred to litho for use as templates. I also used the fantastic art work of Josef Gatial as inspiration and have based it mainly on his interpretation of this awesome if somewhat ungainly monster. The model is built mainly of the following , Body and engines and tail, 5 sizes of Evergreen Plasticard, plastic rod, brass rod and white metal, Cockpit , ICM MIG 31 foxhound , cockpit area Revell X15, Undercarriage , white metal TSR 2, Wheels True Detail 1/48th P80 ( nose) and 1/48th Skyraider ( main), and the afterburners also come from the ICM MIG 31 Foxhound. Cockpit glazing courtesy of Humbrol Clear fix. Construction started with the wings which were built up from 2 ply of Plasticard with a strengthening triangle section inside , then sanded to shape and scribed ( as was the whole airframe ,this was a royal pain in the ar #$ !!!!). Next came the fuselage /engine sides ,same again only this time one layer of card leading edges were all shaped. Room had to be made for the engine bays and U/C and variable air inlet ramps constructed. Engine turbine faces were used from a spare Academy SU27 ( though you can hardly see these !!).the pictures show it better than I can explain so I'll cut the waffle . The cockpit was tricky but in the end I opted for the ICM MIG 31 as the profile fitted perfectly and as luck would have it I had one knocking around , so I butchered it .!!.After filling the top side I needed a whole new cockpit , looking at the pics myself and Geoff B ( Thorvic ) decided that the Revell X-15 kit would be a suitable dionor , and guess what , I happened to have an old one in the loft !!. After quite bit of fiddling I got it to fit , all I had to do now was add new side windows with my Dremel. The undercarriage was also a bit of a poser , in the end the obvious choice was TSR-2 but I couldn't bring myself to use the Airfix ones , fortune smiled on me and Chris ( Falcon) kindly gave me a set of white metal ones he had at the Coventry show .I didn't use much filler as I knew it would have a NMF so I kept that down to a minimum ( thus doubling the build time !!!) The wheels were courtesy of Hannants (True Detail sets for P80 shooting star and Skyraider, low pressure filled with nitrogen was envisaged). The whole thing was primed in Alclad gloss black and airbrushed with EVERY shade of Alcad 2 I had ( which was pretty much the whole range !!!). The decals were from a number of sources , mainly Modeldecal , Xtradecal, and silver, dark grey stripes and solid block. The serial XJ220 was chosen from a cancelled Swift order , the date being correct for the estimated time frame Hopefully the model will have an appropriate diorama base ready for Telford Anyway if you've stayed with me this far , and have not yet lost the will to live and you're eyes haven't glazed over , I thank you and hope you like it , it was fun ( in a sort of put your hand in a Bunson burner kind of way !!).!!!! Thanks again to Thorvic and Falcon for their invaluable help. .................. .Right Matron's coming with a nice cup of steaming hot cocoa, a gag and a bullwhip ,!! off to the front ....Tallyho............................... The pictures ( finally ), This was the inspiration, the plans The build. cockpit took some work The final product , took a bit of work but I got there , what's next ??!!
    14 likes
  5. I have just finished this kit from Airfix, it is oob build, also kit decals. I was quite surprised that the decal in the kit actually was for a known a/c, but can not understand why Airfix did not give pilots name in instruction ??
    14 likes
  6. Hi, everyone! My recently finished LaGG-3... I used Eduard's PE and resin gunsight by Quickboost. All the markings painted using Montex masks. Painted was done, as usually in my case, using Tamiya and Mr.Hobby acrylics. Hope you enjoy
    13 likes
  7. Hi all, I thought I'd share a build I completed a while back for a colleague at work who was leaving. I did intend on doing it wheels down but thought the inflight approach would make a better display item. I found the basic kit from Airfix easy enough to throw together, I had real issues with the finish however, this was kit number 2, the first took a mk2 flight against the wall after attempt number 3 at a gloss enamel finish failed. Finally got to a reasonable finish with acrylics and future. I noticed one of the long side decals was on squint a bit too late Bonus points if you can name the location in the frame/ base -Stuart.
    12 likes
  8. Just finished another project. Polikarpov I-152 (I-15bis) from Special Hobby in 1/48 scale. Building process and more pictures you can see here: https://goo.gl/photos/EWb28Anj2Hx8CUZ77 The model is not for beginners. There were some difficulties, but overall positive experience. The result - one box became less Hope you like it Regards Ivan.
    11 likes
  9. Here is my next venture into 1/48 scale, the Hasegawa Bf109F painted up as Eberhard von Boremski's F4. The kit was very easy to make, I added the external stiffeners to the rear fuselage as I was originally going to be making another aircraft but had a paint issue so changed my plans quite late on. The photos I saw of this aircraft indicate that it might not have had the external stiffeners but they are there now. Painted with my usual Mr Hobby paints. I used decals by EagleCals and Montex masks for the Balkan crosses. I used the photos in the Luftwaffe Colours Vol. 3 Sec. 4 for inspiration although I didn't follow them exactly as the demarcation between colours should have had a slightly softer edge to them in reality. Only light weathering (except for the prop as I got a bit carried away with that!) as the photos were taken while the Unit was re-equiping onto these aircraft although the wing roots did have a lot of mud and dust visible. Duncan B
    11 likes
  10. The Henri Farman HF-27 was not built in any great numbers, but it saw service in a great many places, ranging from the Channel Coast to the Northwest Frontier, by way of the Aegean, Mesopotamia, Arabia, and Russia. Its first operational use was in German Southwest Africa, by South African airmen, and indeed, the fielding of a South African air contingent in that campaign, and the early production of the HF-27, were tightly entwined. Henry and Maurice Farman were pioneering pilots in the heady early days of heavier than air flight in Europe. In 1912, they combined their separate aviation ventures into a single company, with their elder brother Richard handling the business end of things. Within the fraternal firm, Henry and Maurice pursued their own lines of design, Henry's being marketed under the French spelling Henri (they were all sons of an English father and French mother resident in Paris). Henry in his designs favored rotary motors and a wing structure with an upper wing of much greater span than the lower. Maurice favored stationary motors, and a wing structure with an upper wing only slightly greater in span than the lower. Both employed the early 'propulsion' (pusher) configuration in their designs. When the Great War began, Farman aeroplanes equipped over half the front-line escadrille of the Aviation Militaire. The Henri Farman machines, however seemingly suitable in peacetime, did not stand up well to service in the field, proving too fragile for hurried operations off improvised fields, and delicate to fly in any sort of adverse conditions, owing to their maximum speed being only very little greater than their stalling speed. They were withdrawn as soon as doing so became practical, and when the French drew up a plan of standardization and expansion for their air service in October, 1914, Henri Farman designs had no place in it, though Maurice Farmans became a standard reconnaissance type, and were built in great quantity. Henry Farman set out to recoup with a fresh design. It employed steel tube for all major structural components, and employed a sturdy four wheel 'perambulator' undercarriage arrangement, with oleo shock absorbers on its rear legs. It used a Canton-Unne water-cooled radial motor, providing nearly double the horse-power of the rotary Gnome employed on his earlier products, and carried motor and fuel and crew in a simple nacelle very similar in appearance to nacelles of his brother Maurice's designs. The wings were of equal span, and the struts connecting them, of steel tube with wooden fairings, were quite long: the greatly increased gap between the wings made both wings more efficient in generating lift. Only the longeron arrangement and tail surfaces retained the familiar aspects of earlier Henri Farman machines. On occassion English documents refer to the type as an 'HF Voisin', and save for the great gap between the wings, from most angles it does indeed look very much like a Voisin. There can be little doubt Henry Farman was at least 'inspired' by the very successful Voisin III/V series, constructed with steel tube and employing the powerful Canton-Unne radial, with equal span wings and a four wheel undercarriage, in drawing up the HF-27. While Henry Farman was laying out the lines of his new aeroplane, half a world away South Africa's invasion of German Southwest Africa was collapsing in a muddle of half-measures, defeat, and rebellion. At the beginning of the Great War, English troops had been withdrawn from South Africa, leaving military affairs there to the Union Defense Force, a numerous but poorly organized body, whose largest component was a reserve known as the Active Citizens Force. It was the Royal Navy, not the South African government, which wanted German Southwest Africa invaded. The Navy wanted to prevent German cruisers loose on the high seas receiving any aid from several long-range wireless stations in the colony. Going to war against Germany on behalf of England was none too popular with the Boers of South Africa. Many harbored bitter memories of the recent war against England, in which Germany had lent the Boers appreciable support. Balanced against this was the desire for more land and greater influence which conquest of the neighboring German colony would bring. Nor would invading German Southwest Africa be an easy proposition, though it could prove quite profitable. Diamonds had recently been discovered there in commercial quantities, and the northern interior of the colony was a large expanse of dry grassland well suited to cattle-ranching. But the Atlantic coast of the colony, and its southern reaches down to the Orange River, consisted of extremely inhospitable desert. The German Schutztruppe defending the colony was far smaller than the Union Defence Force, even allowing for mobilization of men from the colony's ten thousand or so German residents, but it was highly professional, and well-adapted to desert operations. It was also almost exclusively white: German policy towards the native population had been murderous over the previous decade, and there could be no question of raising a local force of askari. South African forces were exclusively white as well, making this one of the few instances in colonial war of the period in which both sides fielded forces even predominantly European. (Schutztruppe camel detachment) General Botha, the South Arican leader, wanted to mount a three-pronged offensive. Its major component would be a force landed at Walvis Bay. This was a modest indentation on the north coast of the German colony, where a small enclave administered (but not garrisoned) by South Africa remained from an earlier English claim on the coastline. Next door, the Germans had established the port of Swakopmund, at the mouth of the Swakop River, and here one of the wireless stations was located. Gen. Botha envisioned this force striking inland to the colony's capital, Windheok, where another of the wireless stations was located. A second force would be landed at the port of Luderitz, not far north of the mouth of the Orange River on the southern coast. Luderitz was the site of the third wireless station. This force would advance into the interior along a railway line. A third force would be conveyed by sea to Port Nolloh on the South African coast just south of the mouth of the Orange River. It would march inland, cross the Orange River, which was the border between South Africa and German Southwest Africa, moving north with the initial objective of seizing the wells at Sandfontien, tho only reliable source of water for many miles north of the Orange River. This force was to be supported by a body of troops mustered locally. In the event, however, the Royal Navy was unable to provide enough transport for the scheme, and it was the northern force Gen. Botha had seen as the leading element of the invasion that had to be left go, with a naval bombardment of the Swakopmund facilities substituted. The troops from Capetown, commanded by Gen Lukin, began arriving on August 31 at Port Nolloth, while local troops were gathering at Upington, headquarters of the district commander, Col. Maritz. On September 14, Swakopmund was bombarded from the sea. The wireless there was wrecked. Simultaneously, Gen. Lukin's force seized the fords of the Orange River south of Sandfontein. (Fording the Orange River) Next day the Commandant of the Active Citizen Force component of the Union Defense Force, Gen. Beyers, resigned his commission. That evening, driving with a famous fighter of the Boer War, Koos de la Rey, Gen. Beyers encountered a police roadblock, part of a dragnet hunting a fugitive murderer. He did not stop, police opened fire, de la Rey was shot dead. Many Boers believed it deliberate assassination of a bitter opponent of English rule. On September 19, troops were landed without opposition at Luderitz, and Gen. Lukin advanced a small force to Sandfontein. The German Schutztruppe concentrated against Sandfontein, and though the post received some re-inforcement, it was overwhelmed on September 26 by German forces with a decisive advantage in artillery. (Schutztruppe field guns) Colonel Maritz at Upington had been surreptitiously in communication with the Germans for some time, and had given them details of the plans and forces at Sandfontien. He had refused orders to move to assist the beleagured force. He soon moved on to open rebellion, proclaiming the independence of South Africa early in October. There were soon some twelve thousand men under arms against English rule in the former Orange Free State, and in the Transvaal, where Gen. Beyers raised the standard of revolt. (Col. Maritz at his headquarters) Led personally by generals Botha and Smutz, loyal elements of the Union Defense Force turned to suppressing rebellion. Though after the first couple of weeks the outcome was not much in doubt, this task was not completed till early December, by which time Col Maritz and his last followers had sought refuge with the Germans, and Gen. Beyers had been shot off his horse and drowned in the Vaal River while fleeing from a loyalist column. Even as rebellion flared that October, the South African government decided the Union Defence Force required some aeroplanes, and soon. The decision at that point to see to this quickly as possible may well have owed something to the activities of two aeroplanes operating in support of the German Schutztruppe. These had, by mid-October, flown over South African troops encamped south of the Orange River, and assailed South African troops landed at Luderitz with field gun shells dropped as bombs, and leaflets urging them to join the rebellion against England . This sort of thing, widely reported, damaged prestige, made South Africa look second-rate, and in times of trouble, appearances can mean a great deal. (Roland 'Pfiel' biplane, one of the two German aeroplanes) There were a half-dozen Union Defense Force officers trained as pilots then serving with the Royal Flying Corps in France and England. The task of acquiring aeroplanes and equipment for them to employ in German Southwest Africa (under the grand title 'South African Air Corps') was allotted to the oldest among them, Lt. Gerard Percy Wallace. Born in 1885, he was the son of a Sussex clergyman and tutor. Only ten when his father died, he had followed the footsteps of his elder brother, a regular Army officer, to southern Africa. There he joined the Union Defense Force, and acquired the aeronautical bug. He was one of ten men who embarked on flight training at government expense at the Paterson Aviation School at Kimberly in August, 1913. At the time, this boasted two aeroplanes, copies of an early Farman design, though one soon crashed, killing an instructor. Wallace was one of seven who passed the course in December. He received a probationary commission as a lieutenant, and with five other graduates of the Paterson course travelled to England for further training and certification by the Royal Aero Club, which he received in early June, 1914. In November, with a probationary rank of captain, G. P. Wallace arrived in London. Told at the War Office all was in hand for his task, he discovered that in fact nothing was arranged, or even readily available. England and France were engaged in expansion of their air services, and everything in production was spoken for by one body or another. Pressing his inquiries, Capt. Wallace learned of the new type being worked on by Farmans at Paris, that would feature a steel structure most suitable for the desert conditions he and his fellows would be operating in. He met personally with Henry Farman, who was glad of an order for a dozen of the new machines before one had even been completed. In January, 1915, the first 'sample' HF-27 took to the air at Etamps, flown first by Henry Farman, and then by Capt. Wallace with Henry as a passenger. He found the machine quite satisfactory, and looked forward to delivery of the first examples at the end of February. February, however, ended without delivery of a single machine. The enterprising Capt. Wallace detailed an officer to the Farman factory to hurry on the business, and himself arranged for the acquisition of needed steel tube in England and its shipment to the Farman factory. In the middle of that harried month, he learned of the death of his older brother, killed at Nueve Chapelle. At the end of March, three HF-27s emerged from the Farman factory. On April 3rd, titanic packing crates containing their disassembled components were loaded onto the small merchant steamer SS Umvota. They were too large to go into the ship's holds, and had to be lashed down on deck. Two other aeroplanes, donated by the Admiralty, were aboard the vessel, along with Capt. Wallace and two other pilots, when it departed Portsmouth, setting sailing towards German Southwest Africa and Walvis Bay. Walvis Bay was now securely in South African hands. With the rebellion suppressed, and adequate transport available, Gen. Botha had landed two infantry brigades and a cavalry regiment in Walvis Bay on Christmas Day. Shortly after New Years Swakopmund had been seized. Botha himself arrived in Walvis Bay early in February, 1915, with still more troops: two cavalry brigades, several infantry battalions, and sufficient artillery to establish two field batteries and a heavy battery. (South African cavalry advancing in the interior) As this massive force began advancing inland up the Swakop River, the German defenders had little choice but to disengage in the south of the colony, lest they be surrounded and pinned in desert themselves. But the troops from Luderitz and the Orange River fords were close on their heels. By the end of April, the Schutztruppe was concentrated in the north before Gen. Botha's advance on the colony's capital at Windheok, and the several South African forces were all close enough to one another for effective tactical co-ordination. The German defenders had no prospect of defeating their numerous opponents now, but the South African columns, whose difficulties with supply of forage and water for their horses hampered their manouverability, had little prospect as yet of trapping their agile opponents. (Swakopmund viewed from the sea) In the night of April 30, the SS Umvota and its cargo arrived at Walvis Bay. Once that cargo was brought ashore and examined, it became clear that heavy seas encountered on the voyage had badly damaged major components of two of the Farmans. The pair of B.E.2c machines donated by the Admiralty were easier to handle and assemble, but performed very poorly in the hot air, and in any case were badly damaged in accidents within a week of their test flights. They were left unrepaired, as completing assembly of the first Farman was the highest priority. This was achieved by the last week of May, with the aeroplane being flown successfully on several occasions. On May 25, the first assembled HF-27 was flown by Lt. van der Spuy from Walvis Bay to Karibib, a town north of the Swakop River. By this time, the colony's capital Windheok was in South African hands, and the German Schutztruppe was retiring northwards, with South African forces following. Gen. Botha desired a reconnaissance to be flown over Omaruru, some thirty-five miles further on to the north, to determine if the Germans were making a stand there. Winds of 60 miles an hour blowing above 3,000 feet on the 26th made a flight to Omaruru impossible; that same day, the last German aeroplane still in working order crashed when attempting to take off from Kalkfeld to reconnoiter the rail line north of Windhoek. On the 27th, Lt. van der Spuy finally was able to fly north to Omaruru, returning to report the Germans were abandoning the town. Assembly of a second HF-27 was completed at Walvis Bay, and this was flown up to Karibib on June 12. Two more crated Farmans had arrived on the 7th, and night shifts were put on in a successful effort to assemble these quickly; both were ready for service by June 18. South African columns were advancing north, and between June 18 and June 20 the four serviceable Farmans, and attendant ground crew, concentrated at Omaruru, where the Germans had maintained an aerodrome. One of the Farmans, No. 6, was damaged past field repair when it clipped a tree coming in to land on the new field. South African columns on the 20th began moving north over a wide front, with a flying column under Gen. Myberg hooking wide to the east to get behind the retreating Germans, while a force under Gen. Lukin advanced up the rail line from Windheok towards Kalkfeld. Reconnaissances flown from Omaruru over several days revealed strong German forces initially in Kalkfeld were retreating north. Capt. Wallace was instructed to prepare a bombing attack on Kalkfeld on June 24, using field gun shells as bombs. He flew over the place for a final look beforehand, and discovered a column of South African cavalry already there, who identified themselves by laying out white cloth strips in a large 'V' as he circled overhead. To keep up with the rapidly advancing columns, Capt. Wallace ordered his men and machines on to Kalkfeld that very day. Flying in to Kalkfeld on the 25th, van der Spuy found himself landing with a tail-wind, and ran his aeroplane into a tree at the far edge of the field, resulting in great damage to the machine. The unit was soon on the move again, to Otjitasu, another thirty or so miles north by west, where the two Farmans still serviceable landed on June 28. On the 29th, reconnaissance was mingled with bombing, each aeroplane carrying eight field gun shells to be dropped on the Germans retreating up the rail-line towards Otavi. They took off from Otjitasu but landed at Brankpan, a salt flat Capt. Wallace described as 'a magnificent natural aerodrome' which he had reconnoitered by motor car the previous day. From Brankpan on the 30th a Farman was dispatched to try and locate the flying column of Gen. Myberg, which for some while had been out of touch with Gen. Botha's headquarters. On the return leg of the flight, the motor stopped, and the aeroplane was forced to land. A party sent out by truck found the machine, intact and with crew unharmed. A spare engine recently brought up from Walvis Bay was trucked out and fitted in the field. The other Farman took off on the 30th to bomb Germans near Oltavi, and the next day Gen. Lukin's column caught up to them there, and though outnumbered, hustled the Germans out of their positions into a hurried retirement to Khohab. Later that day, they were bombed by the sole remaining serviceable Farman, which this time carried two 112 lb bombs. This was pretty nearly the last hostile act of the campaign. On July 3, the German Governor sent an emmissary to Gen. Botha proposing hostilities cease, with German forces to accept internee status and retain their equipment. This Botha rejected, and as part of his demonstration he meant to continue the fight, one of the Farmans flew a reconnaissance over Khohab on 5 July. On the sixth, Gen Botha imparted his terms to the Governor's emmissary. They were generous as regards personnel, but required all weapons and equipment be surrendered, and he agreed to extend an armistice while the terms were considered. This prevented the two repaired Farmans, finally serviceable again, from being flown up from Kalkfeld to join their fellows at Brankpan. The Germans surrendered on Gen. Botha's terms on July 9th. Capt. Wallace's report on the campaign was most favorable to the HF-27, and its Canton-Unne motor. He felt the aeroplane's great weight (a ton and a half or more) moderated the effects of turbulent air over the desert, and considered its steel framing essential for operating in desert conditions. He noted the only structural element of the Farman which was wood, the struts connecting the longerons, warped badly in the heat, so that replacements had had to be continually made by carpenters in the field to keep the machines braced true. He praised the reliability of the motor, noting there had been only one instance where engine failure had forced a landing. One item of interest, touching on a 'craft' consideration largely forgotten since, was his note that, after no more than a few weeks of operation under desert sun, the fabric of the first two machines assembled had deteriorated to the point that in another fortnight they would have required complete re-covering. Further service of the HF-27 in English hands confirmed Capt. Wallace's view. The Royal Naval Air Service acquired some seventy or so of the type. Several were sent down to German East Africa, where they assisted in the reduction of the German cruiser SMS Konigsberg in July, 1915. These machines were later shipped north to Mesopotamia, where they reinforced an RNAS detatchment assisting in air-lifting supplies into the beseiged garrison at Kut-al-aram in April, 1916, finally being transfered to 30 Sqdn, Royal Flying Corps. The RNAS employed the HF-27 in the Aegean, starting in July, 1915, first in support of the effort at Gallipoli. These were generally fitted with a machine-gun, mounted on a tube frame, to which the observer in the rear seat stood to fire over the pilot's head; the gun was usually a Lewis, but one photograph shows a Vickers so mounted. Their duties ran from ranging fire for ship's guns to bombing. The redoubtable Cmdr. C. R. Samson in December of 1915 flew his HF-27 from Imbros to Constantinople carrying a five hundred pound bomb, which he aimed at a barracks in the city. A more usual load ran to a pair of 112 lb bombs, or one such, and half a dozen or so smaller missiles. Later in 1916, some HF-27s were relegated to training duties, putting the polish on newly fledged pilots just arrived in the theater. R.N.A.S. HF-27s operated on the Channel Coast as well, from Couderkirk, during 1915. They flew anti-submarine patrols, carrying two 65 lb bombs. Pilots on two occasions reported sighting and attacking a U-boat, one claiming his target had been 'blown in half', though this was never confirmed. When a force of three Zeppelins was returning from a raid on the night of June 6/7, 1915, Flt. Sub-Lt. J. S. Mills in an HF-27 sighted one of the dirigibles, followed it back to its base, and bombed and destroyed it in its shed at Evere. This was the same night Flt. Sub-Lt. Warneford bombed and destroyed a Zeppelin in the air; shortly after he was awarded the Victoria Cross for this, he died crashing an HF-27. The Royal Flying Corps acquired a batch of some twenty HF-27s during 1916. 31 Sqdn, formed for service in India, received some of these, and employed them, along with B.E.2cs, on campaigns against various Pathan tribes during 1917. One 31 Sqdn HF-27 was modified to swap the crew's places, putting the observer in the front seat and giving him an efficient machine-gun mounting, but generally the HF-27s in India caried only bombs. Several of 31 Sqdn's HF-27s were detached for service in Aden late in 1917, where they would remain in action till the end of hostilities; one was brought down by Turkish fire. 31 Sqdn passed on a further portion of its HF-27s to 114 Sqdn, when that unit formed at Lahore in November, 1917. With the close of the campaign in German Southwest Africa, the South African Air Corps was disbanded, and its pilots returned to England. There they became the nucleus for a new unit, 26 Squadron RFC, commanded by Maj. Wallace. This was shipped to German East Africa, to join in the campaign there against the German colonial forces led by Gen. von Lettow-Vorbeck. Arriving in December, 1915, 26 Sqdn fielded a mixed equipment, consisting of B.E.2c machines, and the six original Henri Farman HF-27s. In the course of operations in German East Africa, one Farman, the same one which had clipped a tree coming in to land at Omaruru, broke apart in flight, killing its pilot. The surviving Farmans were retired in January, 1917. Maj. G. P. Wallace received the Distiguished Service order in 1916. That same year his younger brother, who had obtained a commission in the Indian Army, was killed in Mesopotamia. The Russian air service acquired a number of HF-27s, though it is not known just when, or how many were purchased from Farman direct. Fifty were built on license by the Dux factory, and more than a dozen were still in front-line service in June of 1917. These were armed, mostly in manner similar to the way the RNAS armed its machines in the Aegean, though some featured a 'swapped seats' arrangement similar to that of the 31 Sqdn 'gunbus'. A variety of machine-gun types were employed.. It is claimed the crew of an HF-27 piloted by A. K. Tumansky succeeded in shooting down a German aeroplane. This model is scratch-built, in 1/72 scale. It represents one of the original Henri Farman HF-27s operated in German Southwest Africa. It is based on photographs appearing in the memoir of Keneth van der Spuy, who had a long career in the South African Air Force, literally from its beginning (he was the first of the trainees to receive Royal Aero Club certification as a pilot). Here are several pictures taken with flash and/or magnification, to show some details.... The finish is conjectural. Henri Farman employed bleached linen, and early rotary types generally used a varnish incorporating linseed oil, which stood up better to the mix of oil and exhaust fumes thrown off by such motors. This had a distinct yellow cast. It seems reasonable to suppose the same finish was employed on this new type, as it would have been on hand in quantity. Photographs of early examples show nacelle and fabric in very similar grey tones. This could indicate employment of a paint on metal or wood panels matched more or less to the color of the fabric. This became a very general French finish later, but early examples of it can be seen in photographs from 1915. Still, it is possible the nacelle is grey-blue (also a common practice, especially in Maurice Farman machines), and that it is only by chance this shows, in orthochrome photographs, a similar grey tone to the fabric. It is also possible the fabric and nacelle have both been given a coat of off-white paint (the apparent practice of the Voisin firm, and sometimes employed by the Caudron brothers, another large manufacturer of the time). I have seen one illustration of a South African HF-27 depicted as lacking any national markings whatever, and suspect this was in fact the case. English practice regarding such was in flux at the time, and Farman certainly would not have applied either roundel or Union Flag at the factory. In the campaign there was no need for nationality markings, since the aeroplanes were radically different in appearance from the familiar German pair, and in any case, by the time the South African aeroplanes were in operations, they were the only things flying. I want particularly to thank Doug, of the South African Air Force forum, who provided me several pictures from the the memoirs of Gen. van der Spuy, which made it possible to build complete this model as a South African machine, and do so with reasonable accuracy as regards the motor mounting. If you need to know anything about the SAAF, try here: http://www.saairforce.co.za/forum/index.php The account given here of the activities of the 'South African Air Corps', and of Capt. Wallace in procuring aeroplanes for it, is based on his report of same, a copy of which was sent me a gentleman who signs himself 'Nieuport11' on the Great War Forum, and I greatly appreciate his doing so. The Great War forum is largely a 'remembrance' site, but people there are extremely knowledgeable and willing to help: http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php Earlier stages of the build can be traced starting here: http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234989782-henri-farman-hf-27-steel-farman-scratch-build-in-172/
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  11. After what seems like a long time (because it has been) I've completed my ICM Bf109 F4 as a Jabo of JG53 using Montex Masks and decals, painted using Mr Hobby acrylics. The kit includes an engine however I didn't have a lot of luck getting it to all line up so made it closed up. I used a colour profile in Kagero's Monograph Series Bf109F Vol 2 as the basis for the paint job. My first attempt at using Montex masks for the Balkan crosses, I didn't fancy using the supplied Swastikas though. I'm not sure I'd bother with the masks if I was to do it again. I replaced the kit's wheels with spares from an Eduard bf109 and that supplied the bomb and rack too. I hope you like it. Duncan B
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  12. Thanks Simon, I'm enjoying it so far... the box is a bit big to sneak in the house unnoticed though, so probably best to get permission beforehand... Thank you John - do you know I've never heard the full version of that song, I do remember my grandfather was quite fond of the tune, he used to occasionally start singing the chorus without any warning Thanks Julian, I was pleased with how they came out - I would be happy if Airfix used these figures for all of their new kits as the detail is well done and it really does show up well, but I was intrigued to see that the new Fokker and BE2 kits will feature 'digitally sculpted' crew members - I'm not entirely sure what that means but I hope that at some point we might see dedicated crew figures for each new kit, well-designed and wearing the appropriate gear... probably a pipe dream as most modellers don't use the crew figures any more, but with decent figures perhaps more modellers might... I think the Wildcat is just about glossy enough for transfers now: ... though I don't know when that will happen, as after work tomorrow I am off for a long weekend in rural Aberdeenshire to see the folks and meet their new pup Millie. I did start the Kate, most of the cockpit interior builds onto the upper-wing centre section and there is a lot of detail there: I did take the liberty of flipping the TAG's seat to face the rear, as it will be displayed on the stand as if in a dogfight so I can't imagine he would be calmly facing forward as if there wasn't a Wildcat bearing down on him... I'm guessing the chair was on some sort of swivel so have fixed it that way, if anyone knows better please let me know - obviously it won't help me but perhaps some future builders... Incidentally most of the detail painting is a mixture of the instructions call-outs, guesswork, other modellers' work on the internet and my own speculative fancy, there isn't much in the way of reference that I could find. Cheers, Stew
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  13. You are of course correct Jessica. I guess you can fuse polystyrene if you have a powerful enough iron and can get it above it's Tm, but really not in any controlled manner. I have seen rivets etc. made from rod and that is a great idea, but I would stick with the old polystyrene cement (no pun intended) So where were we ? Oh yes, one cat chopped and one cat re-plumbed, picked up from the vets and now recuperating in front of the fire. Poor little guys, didn't know what hit them. I'll keep them caged up for the evening and then let them out tomorrow so they can play with their buddies... and I don't need to worry about kitten explosions any more. Wessex, oh yes, there was a Wessex in here somewhere, and I promised to spend some time on it today... and I kept my promise. There are lots'n'lots of phoaties today - and even some progress! The morning started off with the fitting of the aerial mounts. I did get one scare when the paint around the hole chipped pretty badly when I was drilling but thankfully the base of the aerial mount completely covered the damage. Epoxy glue was used to fit the mounts and while it was on it's side I used a steel rule (held very gingerly next to the new hangy-off bits) to align the aerial mounts. Once the epoxy had cured it was a case of threading in that e-z stretchy stuff and tacking itin place with some ca - all pretty straight forward stuff. I really must invest in some new eyes... I could hardly see the darn stuff, even with my magnifiers on. A little bit of the epoxy has wicked, or rather, squeezed out from under the aerial mounts, but it's fairly even so I'm saying it's a gasket! A little bit of matt varnish and some weathering later will get rid of that. The last (I sincerely hope) job on these aerials was to add the steel connector on the front edge. Stainless steel wire to the rescue - easy job. Next item on today's menu was the rotor head. The lower swash plate (is there a lower swash plate?) was painted, fitted and then the control rods from the jacks were added. ... which was quickly followed by the linkage at the port rear. I'm not sure of the correct name for this part, maybe just scissor link - but it's fitted and done now. - and that was the very last thing I need to do in the rotor head area. Woohoo!!! The rotors could then be dropped into place. Since you lot are an observant crowd, you'll have noticed in the shot above that I am using brass tube as a sleeve into the main rotor gearbox. Way, way back when I was panicking and throwing the gearbox together I used brass tube as a liner in the gearbox. I did the same thing with my Dauphin build, and I think I will do it in any future helicopter builds - I use a slightly smaller diameter bras tube in the main rotor head itself - this means that I can easily remove the rotor blades if I ever need to, and it's a much stronger joint than any plastic can achieve - with the added bonus that the rotor blades can actually rotate. who'da thunkit eh? These aren't great photo's but you get the idea.... now looking more and more helicopterish isn't it ? I can't quite remember why I took this shot but it shows the rotor head of quite nicely. It doesn't look as clunky as the stock oob items. I think the additional work I did on the head has paid off. Things seemed to be going well and I felt I was on a roll. What to tackle next ?.... well, one job I hadn't been looking forward to was fitting the nose door. Back when I made it, I hadn't really put much thought into how on earth I was going to get the thing fitted.... now was the time. A quick scrabble about in my spares box produced these little pieces of PE - originally a scissor link for the Trumpeter Dauphin - so cut in half they were.... .. and a couple of razor saw cuts later... well. with some superglue but you probably guessed that. Okay, that was the cosmetics taken care of - now how on earth do I really stick the part on ???? Well, I ended up using brass wire drilling into the nose and then epoxied into the nose and into the front bay. There was lots of tweaking and general phaffing about, but in the end I got the position I thought it needed. A Wessex does like getting it's belly rubbed doesn't it ? This was the best way I could figure to apply the epoxy glue without it dripping back out and ruining something.... it seemed to work. After the epoxy cured I added the door stay and painted it up - weathering and grunginess to be added later. This is the right way up for a Wessex! I may have the open angle a tad too large but I think I can live with it.... all the better to see those little gnomes with ! .. and now a couple of gratuitous shots for no particular reason. I think anyone who has ever worked on a Wessex will find this pose familiar.... not to mention this one also (I really must get some more lighting in the basement) The tail wheel was finally permanently fitted, just ever so slightly askew. - I mentione din a previous post that I thought the tail wheel was about the only part I hadn't modified in some way or other - I was wrong.... I had added the towing lugs to the tail wheel. Since I seemed to be getting carried away with fitting things in a permanent manner I also threw on the trans deck doors - and added the support cable (well, ez stretchy stuff) - which you can hardly see, but it's there. Same with the starboard side, and the winch hatch fitted, which now nicely hides all the work I did putting hydraulics into the winch... but I know it's there. All in all not a bad days progress. It seems like I am almost there but I know there is still a reasonable amount of work to complete before I'll be able to put this one to rest. So, at the end of today, this is where the Wessi is at.... Yes, I had to clean up my work area.... the Wessex has now become an absolute nightmare to handle. In fact I have resorted to turning the mat (hence the cleanup!) whenever possible and trying to avoid any kind of handling as I am bound to break something before too long. Well, 3 days left before this becomes a one year build - will he manage to get it finished ?
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  14. Me 262 HG 111 Kick Arsch Nachtjager , Predannack , Cornwall September 1946 Build thred http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234989335-trimaster-me-262-hg-111-nachtjager/
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  15. Hi all, Thought I'd share some pictures of a build I completed earlier in the year. Lovely kit from Trumpeter, went together without any major issues. Really need to work on the photography locations, the couch and a laptop will do for now.... Let me know what you think -STuart
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  16. Hi More jets from my growing 56 Sqn collection. All thoughts, especially negative/constructive ones are much appreciated, fixes for them would be even better. Without criticism Ill never improve, so please, dont be shy, Im a big boy and I dont cry easily. Im aware of plenty of faults, I dont mind at all for more to be pointed out. Thanks for looking. Sweaty
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  17. Arii/Otali 1/48 F6F-3 hellcat USS Yorktown 1943
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  18. OK chaps here's a few taken a while back in the (proving)grounds of Melchett Towers with a touch of PS to add a bit of 50's atmos....hope you like. MiG-25 eat your heart out.....EE had those huge air gobbling intakes in mind long before Artem and the gang...
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  19. Not sure if she'll wear Nos 1 or 4 Sqn markings, but aiming at a late 70s finish. I managed to get the spraying done today and off with all that Blu tack! A little tidying to do and a coat or two of Klear before masking off the Aden pods and spraying those next.
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  20. Revell French Rafale M with GBU racks. Added Eduard small PE.
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  21. Hello! This is one of my tribute builds to salute "The Few" and one man who's story that never fails to touch my heart and inspire me. This is my build of Flying Officer Geoffrey Wellum's Spitfire Mk.Ia, K9998. For those of you who might not know, Geoffrey Wellum DFC was the youngest fighter pilot in the RAF during the Battle of Britain. He was eighteen years old. He flew all the way through the battle and then onto the siege of Malta in 1942. He published his memoir "First Light" when he was 80 years old and it has widely become known as one of the must-read accounts of the battle. I have wanted to build Geoff's 92 Sqn Mk.I a for ages! With the 75th anniversary this year, it seems quite appropriate to dust off Revell's 1/32 Spitfire. M.II. I did a little backdating and a lot of research and I think I have got this one right. (Still not sure though....) We all have our views about this kit, for me it's wonderful. It's a model of a Spitfire! That's all I need! With the kit, I also used Barracuda resin, Eduard PE and Xtradecal codes to make K9998 as there is no sheet with these markings currently available. I used Mr. Hobby RAF Earth/ RAF Dark Green for upper surfaces and Tamiya Sky for the under surfaces. I enjoyed this build immensely and will certainly build another one of these kits in the future, I think they are great! I hope you enjoy my tribute to the "The Few". Geoff Wellum once said: "If you remember one of us, then you must remember all of us"
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  22. Sneak peak time. Thanks to the generosity of one of the esteemed members on here, phil you're a godsend, I have some hydra decals! Like I said, a sneak look at what I'm aiming at. Currently drying under micro set/sol. So far, my impression of these decals are good, they're nicely printed and are in good register. Need careful trimming though, as there is no separation on the carrier film. Thanks again phil, couldn't have done it without you. Matt
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  23. Well, it's been a while, what with hammering away at my Hurricane conversion for the BoB GB, meeting lots of funny people with BM badges at Telford, and various other things, including an ongoing attempt to catalog and label my late grandfather's fossil collection. Anyone on here an expert in Lower Cretaceous brachiopods? Anyhow, some Vulcan has got done in this time. The exhausts are done. You can hold the fuselage halves up to the light and practically see through them, but the brass pipes fit. Just. The cockpit interior is all done and primed. One of my bits of foil on the bulkhead (designed to replicate the loose fabric covering/rudimentary padding in this area has fallen off and got lost at some stage. Since it's going to be almost completely invisible, I've not bothered with replacing it. I improvised some rear turbine faces for the engines by cutting down the kit engine faces (remember I'm using resin replacements). The brass tubes I'm using are about 3 inches long and it's very, very dark in there. However, I am emphatically *not* wasting time. Or at least, that's what I have to keep chanting to myself. I wouldn't have bothered with the rear crew seats, only I had three handy seats kicking around the spares box. These are from the Valiant kit, they're pretty well useless if you want an accurate Valiant (the sort of mistake Airfix were making not even 5 years ago!). I decided they were also not very useful for anything else either, except that they look quite like Vulcan seats. You'll have to perform quite a contortion to see them, but they'll be there. Speaking of stuff that looks almost right, I've been preparing these ejector seats from CMK. They're not actually V-bomber ejector seats (which seem to be unobtainable), but they're for the Canberra PR.9 and to my eyes look pretty much a dead ringer for the real thing. The ejector seats are almost the only part of a 1:72 Vulcan you can even see from outside (without peering up the tiny crew hatch) so I though they were worth the effort to tart up. Apart from this the top deck is going to be entirely OOB. Ta-ta. I'm off to sit down and do some painting in the esteemed company of a Highland Park 12...
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  24. Hello again, This is my second post for today, So here it is a (straight OOB build) new Revell Jas-39C Gripen. (Note all the clear parts were just placed for the photo shoot, they are not-glued, including hud and wind shield - I will add a pilot in the future...) If You like to see video build here is the link: Thanks for looking! All the best! Dusan.
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  25. DAPS duly detailed and almost ready to be installed permanently; all that remains to be added is a pair of wave-off lights at the base. Looking at the Jacobin plans (on which it is sitting in this picture, but you cannot see the relevant bit) I am not convinced that Airfix have got the geometry right, but this is going to have to do - there are limits to how much of this ship I am going to scratch build!
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  26. That's nice for them Let's not have any political nonsense though, shall we?
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  27. Well new to me Constructed this one for the What If G/B from the old Trimaster 262a Nachtjager kit which gave me no problems as the Revell kit was recomended . Build thred http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234989335-trimaster-me-262-hg-111-nachtjager/
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  28. Ok, so I have got a lot done since my last post and the model is now 90% finished. All that remains to be done is to paint and attach the undercarriage, propellers, doors, ladders, wheels and make a radio antenna. I will then finish it up with some final detail painting and weathering. I have taken some not particularly good pictures this evening and I will try to take some better ones in day light. Just waiting for it stop raining so I can take it back to the workshop. Matt.
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  29. Smilla, our second birman, has arrived a week ago. Isn't she sweet? And that's socrates, trying to tell me that I should use Revell 78, and not Revell 8... Alex
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  30. Seeing Kinetic's gorgeous FRS1 recently got the Harrier juices flowing, but not being available as yet, and realising that inevitably Kinetic would be releasing a GR3 within the next couple of years, I decided the next best thing was to get stuck into a project thats been on the cards for some time. Brief history lesson - The Airfix GR3 is rubbish the Monogram although dated, isn't so as many before me have done, bang em togther. Components inc Airfix Nose section & Tail All raised detail removed and a complete re-scribe Neomega FRS1 set (will unashamedly use this as a GR3 pit) Heritage intakes although I decided against these and used the Monogram parts with home made blow doors The Monogram glazing doesnt fit the Airfix nose section, but thankfully the Airfix part looks ok anyway - replaced the pathetic pitot tube set up The kits sausaged/Maskolled up ready for spraying today - my favourite part
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  31. Hi, Been a while since I last built a model but due to inclement weather, shorter days and the start of yet another reality TV show airing, I decided to "get me out of here" and find a wee project to keep me amused. Decided to build a fixed wing aircraft this time but stayed with the Fleet Air Arm theme and purchased the Sword 1:72 Fairey Gannet AEW.3 from flea bay. Apart from a wee 1970's pilot, this will be built OOB. Hopefully, I will be able to do it justice and if possible, change the airframe number to represent the old gate guard that sat at HMS Gannet for many a year. I do believe that she is now safely on display at the Dumfries & Galloway Aviation Museum - http://www.dumfriesaviationmuseum.com/fairey-gannet/ The following is a photo of her, quite a few years ago, resplendent in the Ayrshire sunshine The kit seems okay with plenty of recessed panel lines and raised detail. The instructions are very good and it would appear at first glance to be a straightforward build. I did notice that there is no numbers on each sprue part but this isn't really a problem as the diagrams are clear and there are not really that very many parts. Included in the kit is some photo etch for seat belts and panel instrumentation, although this cannot really be seen when the fuselage halves are joined together. I built up the cockpit, converted a modern "PJ production" SAR pilot into a 1970's pilot and popped him into place. There was not point in doing anything else with the interior as it is not on show. Having build an ASW version of this model some years ago, it is definitely a tail sitter, so I used some self adhesive car wheel balancing weights and stuck 20 grammes into the nose/cockpit section before gluing it together. I also used some pink tac to create the right amount of clearance and extra support for the nose wheel bay and cockpit tub. Most of the two fuselage halves went together fine but there is no real depth to the locating spigots on each half and there was a bit of sanding/fettling required to get the front section to mate together especially around the cockpit. More work required on this when cured. The wee pilot seems happy enough for now though .. The biggest problem is that the AEW dome on the underside has a huge gap which has required a liberal amount of filler to close. This will mean even more sanding and re scribing one it has fully hardened. Not much else to add at the moment, except that should be a fairly fast build, ie weeks instead of months. I purchased a rivet wheel a few weeks back but will wait and see if I will use it on this. Glad to be back building again, all the best B
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  32. A full build article is to be featured in the next Airfix Model World, which will be out in a couple weeks, but in the mean time, here's a sneak peak at my Pilot Replicas J21. After the issue hits the stands, I'll be happy to answer any questions and post additional photos. Cheers, Eric
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  33. As promised here Is my 1/48 Twin seater Eurofighter made by Revell.The kit went together very well with some minor fit issues(gear well wiring is homemade)Its by far the best kit I've ever made in my 2 years of modelling. For the build I used Revell's contacta professional and Tamiya extra thin cement.Painted it with Tamiya spray cans and Revell enamels(yes,that's right,Revell enamels). And I apologise for bad image quality,I'm getting a new camera for my birthday in 2 months time.
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  34. I thought that I had better come up to the surface and let you know what I've been up to with this build. I'm afraid I was a bit lethargic last week, after all the scurrying around SMW2015 over that weekend; however, I'm back at it now. There are quite a few buildings and vehicles still to be completed and I have been getting on with them. Here is a view of these in various stages of build, priming and finishing. I have also been putting some time into getting the aircraft done. The Skyraiders and one of the Hercules has had the camouflage added and are ready for wheels and props etc., before getting a coat of Klear or satin varnish. A bit more has been done on the scratchbuild of the Super Sabre, plus I am also working on resin kits of a Huey and a Choctaw. Still a lot to do yet and I'll hopefully be able to show more updates later. cheers Mike
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  35. Hello everyone, my name is Oliver, 35 years old and this is my first post here on BM. May i present you my Revell 1:32 RAF-Typhoon. Build with Eduard Interior, Eduard Exterior, RBF and Seatbelts. Colors with Revell spraycans (i have no airbrush) After long time studing the walkways i build the Eurofighter in about 3 months hard work. This is my first build after a break of nearly 20 years, please go easy There where lots of problems with this kit (intake, apu, speedbreak...) But finally, i managed it. Now, its almost done (APU, cleaning and a glasbox for the aircraft) and my next build i started yesterday will be a Revell 1:32 BAe Hawk. Please feel free to critise as everyone learns from there mistakes. Enjoy the pics. Oliver
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  36. Hello and thanks for your interest! This is my latest model, the 1/72 Airfix Hawker Typhoon, dressed as "F-3A 'Diane'", serial number MN716, flown by Pilot Officer R.G. Fox in November 1944. The model was built from the box, the only addition was photo-etch seatbelts from CMK. Decals are from the Aviaeology sheet "RCAF Hawker Typhoon Mk.IB 1944 to Bodenplatte" (https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/AOD72008). The Squadrons covered are No 438, 439 and 440 Sqns during 1944 through to operation Bodenplatte. The series covers nine different subject aircraft including one car door version and eight bubble canopy versions. Aviaeology include an exclusive on the two sizes of the early “type B” upper wing roundels. Aviaelogy supply far more than your average aftermarket decal sheet, in fact it is a multi-page b/w booklet with background info and b/w pictures of some of the aircraft featured. A colour PDF version of the colour scheme is available for free though registering on the Aviaeology Web Site. The decals are of highest quality and perform flawlessly. However I did manage to break up the correct "F3" codes for this particular machine by mishandling them; I had to fall back to another "F3" code that has a slightly different font. I guess you would not have noticed unless you're an expert on 2.TAF aircraft (or you work for Aviaeology). Former squadron codes ("5V") were overpainted; I copied this by spraying the "5V" codes with dark grey through a paper mask before applying the "F3" codes over it. If you look closely, you will notice that the "F3" codes look brighter then the code letter "A" - this is intentional as I believe only the "5V/F3" code was changed. I tried to replicate the tatty appearance of the invasion stripes on the lower fuselage. The model was painted with Gunze acrylics. Photographs by Wolfgang Rabel, IGM Cars & Bikes.
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  37. Morning folk's just a quickie as last session till next week as big weekend ahead(eldest's wedding) took the plunge and permanently fixed the wing's in place and added the remaining main decals so next job will be a wash on all that white!
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  38. Zinc dichromate hydrate, zinc potassium chromate hydrate of approximate composition, a sodium analogue version of that and zinc chromate hydroxide. Zinc potassium chromate is also divided commercially into two groups, Type I and II. There are three separate categories as Pigment Yellow in the Colour Index (CI). Zinc chromate is also called zinc chrome and zinc yellow, the latter term in common use by the belligerents during WW2 which has probably contributed to the erroneous belief that only the USA used zinc chromate in aircraft production. In fact it has been known since 1860 but zinc chromate hydroxide was only patented in 1941. Its value as an anti-corrosive treatment was enhanced by the introduction of light metals for aircraft. There are probably many more modern varieties reflecting different proprietary formulae using other ingredients which are simply called 'Zinc Chromate' as a generic term. Colour shade will depend on the type of original pigment and manufacturing process and the tinted variety will invariably show variance in batch, partly because of the type of pigment used and partly because of minor ratio differences during manufacture. Light and dark appearance can also be the result of exposure and degradation following application, again dependent on the original pigment formula and application methods. Nick
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  40. Thanks guys, appreciate the comments. Lighting time is some way off (might try and get the wired at the weekend), been busy with work etc., but managed to get the base roughed out and just about started on the type 23 escort (separate WIP). Cheers Nick
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  41. Thanks all! Nice to have you on board. Much of my recent work on the Vulcan has been on the interior. Now, I realise that the Vulcan's interior is largely black, you can't pose the canopy open, and the windows are tiny, and therefore that it's a bit pointless trying to build much of any of it. However, I want to have the crew door open, and there's a reasonable amount of detail under the rear crew members' floor which is pretty visible through the aperture. This is a mix of structural bits holding up the floor above, the two jump seats which carry "spare" crew such as mechanics on overseas deployments, electric and hydraulic lines, and various esoteric black equipment boxes. So I've been busy tinkering with these bits as you see below. This superb walkaround of the interior on BM has been invaluable. Thanks, Fmk.6John! I've also been making a start on the exhausts. Now, my subject XM605 is an Olympus 301-engined machine, so I haven't bought resin replacement jetpipes - they just don't seem to exist. Instead, I'm going to represent them with brass tube. The plastic jetpipes need thinning to a wafer thickness in order to accommodate the pipes, so I purchased a full-sized, DIY-style rasp file and set about them. You know it's a proper model when DIY tools are involved! The sharp edges of the pipes themselves also make an excellent planing tool when pushed vigorously through the hole (innuendo fully intended). First photo shows the unmodified kit exhausts, while the second is the modified side, although only the leftmost pipe is basically finished. That's all for now folks
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  42. With apologies for the finger trouble which caused the post to go up half-cocked, here's the lovely little Airfix Spitfire 22, almost out of the box, but with the following tweaks for a 24: starboard rear fuselage hatch moved forward as for a Mk 24 rear fuselage fuel filler added shortened gun barrels for a late 24 undercarriage doors changed to Seafire type for a late 24 (I think this is correct for this aircraft - VN496, the last Spitfire, had them but it's not an exact science for earlier airframes) bomb racks and rocket rails adapted from Special Hobby items drilled out exhaust pipes added separation hooks for fuselage sipper tank decals from the spares box This great photo (found at http://www.talkmorga...n_veteran_air_)was the inspiration: And here's the model:
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  43. Very simple diorama that I have made for putting and showing off men and vehicles. Please forgive the pictures, but trying to get a good nautral light in Scotland is almost impossible at the moment
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  44. I've just finished my latest model of a P-51D of the 359th FG. I have seen hardly any 1/72 (or any scale for that matter) depictions of Ray S. Wetmore's "Daddy's Girl" Mustang, depite being the aircraft of the leading ace of the 359th FG, as well as one of the highest scoring American aces in Europe! It also wears some pleasing colours on the nose and rudder. This is the best picture I have of the subject, and I found 3 more b&w pictures, as well as a WWII colour photo of the plane before bearing the "Daddy's Girl" writing. To build the model I have used the new tool Airfix kit, with decals from the old tool P-51D Daddy's Girl Mustang starter set. I've used the cockpit, seatbelts and part of the landing gear suspension mechanism of a Smer P-51 kit and then I scratch built the rear view mirror. So...not really an OOB build. I've appropriately filled the panel lines on the upper and lower surfaces of the main wings, which I think gives it a more realistic look, although the other panel lines are very deep, as I am sure many a modeller have complained about before me. Another thing about the Airfix new tool kit that is pretty annoying is the aerial mast. It's not clean at all and covered in flash and very flimsy. I broke one in the process of seperating it from the sprue. I had a spare, but this one also broke - even though I was super careful - when I slipped while sanding it smooth. I ended up using the mast from the old tool Airfix kit. Although I don't think this plane was ever very dirty (maybe after a sortie, but kept pretty clean otherwise), I have made use of dry pastels, oils and dry brushing to emulate a plane that isn't super clean. Initially I thought I overdid it, but I think the end result is acceptable. Something I only realised when I was almost finished is the kill markings decal for the port side of the canopy is marked with crosses, and not swastikas like the real subject! I really hope this does not detract too much off the end result... Anyway, enough talk. Please look at the pictures below, and I hope you can enjoy it. Cheers J
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  45. Sorry for the wait guys. The stuff i ordered from Accurate Armour arrived sooner than i had expected so i was able to get those done and fitted. After the last update, i gave everything a coat of future with some Tamiya flat. I then added the tools and items from AA, bergans, roll mates and oil cans. I made some bungee's with some wire and used these to secure some of the kit. According to the decals instructions, the markings on the rear and left of the turret were done on vardboard. The only stuff i had that was sutable was some WW2 German box's. As i don't think a box with a German eagle and Swastika on it would have gone down to well, i managed to find enough that had no print on it to use. None of the bags i have will fit into the side bins and i don't have anything else sutable to use so have decided to leave the side bin half empty. I might add a bit of cam net into the front one but there is no way that will hold a full chally net. I also worked on the tracks, giving the inside 2 coats of Vallejo steel and an oil wash on Raw Umber and Yellow Orche mix on both sides. After adding all the baggage, i gave the whole thing another coat of future/Tamiya flat and then some AK N Africa dust effects. This was applied quite heavy low down and light as i went higher up. As i had hoped, this has toned down the pin wash. I also added some exhausts stain with Tamiya smoke mixed with a little black. Next up will be some streak effects and some oil staining followed by a coat of Alclad clear and then the pigments for the final stage.
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  46. Good bit to show. Panel wash was on first thing this morning and left for an hour or so: Cleaned off with kitchen roll and cotton buds: Good base for which to start the heavy weathering after the matt coat is on. Once that had dried, I added the fuel tank, landing gear, horizontal stabilisers, air vent doors, air brakes, Zuni pods, AIM-7s and the napalm tanks: Next up is to add the MK82s before giving it a coat of matt, attaching the exhausts then adding the pigments for the weathering. After that, it's just the seats and cockpit that need finished off. More soon. Dave
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  47. Agree. I do think Airfix have a very good strategy right now and I suspect part of this is down to the way that Hornby changed their own marketing strategy for model trains some years back. Maintain some of the old favorites (and so-called 'starter sets' like the Flying Scotsman etc) whilst introducing a new range of highly detailed and accurate scale replicas for the discerning connoisseur. I believe Airfix are now applying the same principles, and perhaps even going one better. They are bringing out up to date, accurate renditions of the so-called 'pocket money' kits that will appeal not only to children but also adult builders who appreciate a 21st Century update of their favourite kit from the past, combined with 'high end' kits, such as the 1:24 scale Typhoon and Mosquito, 1:12 scale Bentley and 1:72 scale Shackleton etc. As another co-respondent has also put, there is little doubt that box art and overall presentation also sells kits….just look at some of the rather mediocre Hasegawa kits that still sell because of the box art compared with some superb renditions from Eastern Europe that still struggle in the market due to poor packaging. I think perhaps the only part that is missing from the Airfix strategy is the broader coverage via newsagents etc. I regularly travel to Germany and have been amazed at some of the places where I have found Revell kits on sale……..garden centres, garage forecourts, DIY stores, stationery shops etc…..every branch of every department store chain (Muller, for example) also seems to stock a relatively decent range of Revell kits, together with paints, glues etc.
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  48. Kind of you to say so Rob Here she is up on her legs. I resisted the urge to use the Eduard PE fasteners, only because I wanted to keep moving forward
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  49. Some good stuff there Ced and how nice of those kind chaps at Humbrol to put their paint in 14ml tinlets. I have no excuses now for mixing an incorrect shade of the RAF's new Ocean Grey. Oh no, I forgot about the minefield of 1/72 scale effect on colour . Perhaps a blue/grey with strong backlighting would be the solution. Modelling was so much simpler when 'I were a lad'. Jumpers for goalposts etc. etc. By 'em, Build 'em, Decal 'em if you were patient enough. Then it was outside to attack the small plastic army invading the back garden.
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  50. Hi Sean - good luck with the Gunze Yes, I do sleep, but us old 'uns don't need as much and, since my daughters were babies, I've been trained out of 'lie ins'. Sadly Two days of dithering... testing the paint indeed, it's just a couple of small stripes for goodness sake! I tested the H24 decanted from the rattle can and it covers well so on with the masks; Tamiya tape carefully around the stripe and cheap masking tape to protect from 'overspray', blasted with the paint at close quarters: Untitled by Ced Bufton, on Flickr Bit of 'overspray' go through the mask: Untitled by Ced Bufton, on Flickr Strange that the stripes are a different size on the two marks - what are those strips for?? Anyway, I'm happy with the damn things now and the tail band on the F1, although the F3 is too narrow: Tail bands by Ced Bufton, on Flickr
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